Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Young Dawg (Member)

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    13

    Default Neutering Consequences

    Hello,

    Would anyone mind sharing their personal experiences with neutering? Contemplating neutering a 2 year old male with some behavior issues. We're also working with a trainer. However, concerned the hormones might be a large contributing factor.

    New research has produced some negative health and behavior results. His bad behavior does seem to have a ***ual connection so we think it might have a positive result.

    Would so appreciate hearing from others.

    Thank you!!
    Kathleen

  2. #2
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) SebastiansMom's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    2,448

    Default

    From what youíre describing, it sounds to me like neutering is a good idea. It likely wonít be a magic cure for the behavior, but once all of the testosterone has left his system, thereís a good chance that his behavior could be more easily managed.

    My Sebastian was neutered early and was still a very difficult puppy and adolescent. I shudder to think what life with him would have been like had he remained intact. Iím not sure I could have handled him. Even knowing now that his age at the time of his neuter *may* have contributed to his recent bone cancer diagnosis, I feel that his early neuter was the right decision for him at the time. It gave me the ability to work with him without the testosterone distraction, and form a bond with him that Iím not sure I would have had otherwise.

    Chester, my lab mix, came to live with us when he was about a year old, and was still intact. He had a lot of testosterone-related unwanted behaviors (nothing serious, just humping and marking everything in sight, amongst others) that resolved once he was neutered.
    Sebastian is on Facebook!
    www.facebook.com/SirSaintSebastian

  3. #3
    Young Dawg (Member)

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SebastiansMom View Post
    From what youíre describing, it sounds to me like neutering is a good idea. It likely wonít be a magic cure for the behavior, but once all of the testosterone has left his system, thereís a good chance that his behavior could be more easily managed.

    My Sebastian was neutered early and was still a very difficult puppy and adolescent. I shudder to think what life with him would have been like had he remained intact. Iím not sure I could have handled him. Even knowing now that his age at the time of his neuter *may* have contributed to his recent bone cancer diagnosis, I feel that his early neuter was the right decision for him at the time. It gave me the ability to work with him without the testosterone distraction, and form a bond with him that Iím not sure I would have had otherwise.

    Chester, my lab mix, came to live with us when he was about a year old, and was still intact. He had a lot of testosterone-related unwanted behaviors (nothing serious, just humping and marking everything in sight, amongst others) that resolved once he was neutered.

    Thanks so much for the feedback. Yes, the recent studies make decisions so challenging. I had similar thoughts about our previous female dog who we lost to cancer at seven. However, there are just so many potential environmental insults that it's just so difficult to guesstimate. I keep reminding myself that we can only do our best.

    I wish you and Sebastain the best.

    Thank you for your help!
    Kathleen

  4. #4
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Jewel's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    5,004
      Jewel`s Photos

    Default

    As you probably already know, the concern of neutering early is that the hormones won't be able to play their role in development, including the timing of the closing of the growth plates. Since your boy is already at an age where the growth plates mostly likely are closed, that concern is no longer an issue.

    Statistics show that some males develop aggression after neutering. I would say based on all the posts that I've read over the years from pyr owners increase of aggression after neuter is not common. Most people report improvement in behavior in terms of reactivity and other intact male related behaviors like SM mentioned above with Chester.

    A friend had a stud show doberman stud who was a sweetheart if he liked you. But if he didn't like you, he could be quick to let you know. We always had to be very diligent when he was out and about. Once he was neutered, he mellowed out a whole lot. The high strung energy calmed down visibly.

  5. #5
    Young Dawg (Member)

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jewel View Post
    As you probably already know, the concern of neutering early is that the hormones won't be able to play their role in development, including the timing of the closing of the growth plates. Since your boy is already at an age where the growth plates mostly likely are closed, that concern is no longer an issue.

    Statistics show that some males develop aggression after neutering. I would say based on all the posts that I've read over the years from pyr owners increase of aggression after neuter is not common. Most people report improvement in behavior in terms of reactivity and other intact male related behaviors like SM mentioned above with Chester.

    A friend had a stud show doberman stud who was a sweetheart if he liked you. But if he didn't like you, he could be quick to let you know. We always had to be very diligent when he was out and about. Once he was neutered, he mellowed out a whole lot. The high strung energy calmed down visibly.

    Thank you for that feedback. Yes. the study/studies suggesting an increase in fear and/or aggression adds to the concerns. I so appreciate the personal accounts. I can't help but wonder if the studies are a true reflection.
    Thanks again!

  6. #6
    Puppy (New Member)

    Former Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Kent
    Posts
    1

    Default

    A raise in fear and aggression is a very scary notion. I was thinking about neutering, but I don't want to inflict this on my dog.

  7. #7
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Jewel's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    5,004
      Jewel`s Photos

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Averill View Post
    A raise in fear and aggression is a very scary notion. I was thinking about neutering, but I don't want to inflict this on my dog.

    It's absolutely one's own choice, and hopefully one is able to ensure accidental litters won't happen.

    While there are some dogs that may exhibit more fear reactivity after neutering, I dare say there are more cases where aggression and other undesirable intact male traits are reduced with neutering. Thus the statistically slight risk of increased fear reactivity should be but one of several factors to consider when making the decision.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •