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  1. #1
    Young Dawg (Member)

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Parkdale, OR
    Posts
    10

    Default Need to rehome or worse

    My 3 year old Pyr Angus is aggressive. He was gifted to me as a puppy, socialized daily at my work and trained like a dream. At age 18 months, he started barking aggressively at customers to the point I had to stop bringing him into work. Over the last 8 months, he has bitten two people. Snap and back. I had a longtime friend visit today and he is a pyr owner and comfortable with these big dudes. As he was leaving, Angus was standing next to him wagging his tail and being petted - then he just snapped at his hand. Puncture wound. Blood.

    Angus's aggressive behavior has always had me worried. I have teen girls and their friends come in and out without knocks and hes starting to lurch at them aggressively. He is a big dog.

    I would like to rehome him with someone close that is willing to work with him. I would happily pay up to $500 for training but no longer can keep him in our home.

    I ask respectfully that you refrain from giving me advice on how to help him myself and keep negative judgments to yourself. I have tried many many things up to a couple of trainers. I need to do whats best for him and myself. Click image for larger version. 

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  2. #2
    Young Dawg (Member)

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Parkdale, OR
    Posts
    10

    Default

    Update: I spoke with a friend of a friend that is a trainer and she believes she can help Angus. The Angus anguish had been real today since this mornings bite and I am afraid that my post is reactionary to the stress of what happened and, tbh, the stress of having a large dog that is unpredictable. We can change things/visitors etc in our household but there is a constant worry of him getting out and running amok in the neighborhood. In any case, I am going back to basics with a behaviorist and more training and see where we get.

  3. #3
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) SebastiansMom's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    2,436

    Default

    I looked back at an old thread you started when Angus was still going to work with you, and saw that we recommended that you read some of Patricia McConnell’s books. Were you ever able to do that? If you are planning on working with him and haven’t been able to read the books, I strongly urge you to do so now. The two that I recommend are “The Other End of the Leash” and “For the Love of a Dog.

    I would also encourage you to read this article by the late Dr. Sophia Yin:
    https://drsophiayin.com/blog/entry/w...evels-in-dogs/

    I recommended years ago that you keep a detailed journal of his behavior - what happened in the moments leading up to the unwanted behavior, which unwanted behavior occurred, what environmental factors may have affected the behavior, how was the behavior handled, etc. This can be very helpful in trying to discern a pattern. For example, if Angus tends to display unwanted behavior around people who are wearing sunglasses, you can ask people to remove their sunglasses before interacting with him. Likewise, if you notice that he tends to have unwanted behaviors more often on particularly windy (or rainy, or cold, or hot) days, you can prevent people from interacting with him on days where the weather might provoke an outburst.

    One of the most important aspects of helping him get better is to do everything you can to keep him “under threshold” - that is, try with everything you have to prevent him from biting again. Yes, I know, easier said than done - otherwise, we wouldn’t be here. Something that will greatly help here is learning to read his body language. Yes, Angus’ tail was wagging when he bit your friend today, but a wagging tail does not always equal a friendly dog. The best description I know of a wagging tail comes from one of Patrica McConnel’s books, where she describes it as the dog saying simply, “I want to interact with you”. You have to put all of the signals that the dog is sending with his body language to determine whether the dog wants to kiss you or bite you.

    There is an excellent app for iOS and Android called DogDecoder. I highly recommend it for learning dog body language. I highly recommend learning to read body language because it WILL help you prevent bites from happening. You will be able to see the subtle signs that Angus is uncomfortable/unhappy in a specific interaction, and you will be able to remove him from that situation before he goes over his threshold for tolerating said situation.

    Sending good energy to you and Angus. Please keep us posted.
    Sebastian is on Facebook!
    www.facebook.com/SirSaintSebastian

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