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  1. #1
    Puppy (New Member)

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    Default Should we let him out?

    Our pupper, Patch, gets hot indoors. When he wants to go out, he makes a hum-whine sound. He is constantly asking to go out. This isn't usually an issue. Someone is always home, and awake, day and night. But sometimes he turns into a barky mcbarkface outside at night. We have a large, fenced-in backyard. But there are neighbors on all three sides. They have dogs as well. When Patch goes out at night and sees or hears the other dogs, he barks. And barks. He's only seven months old, but his bark is LOUD. The neighbors yell at him and curse the day he was born. Sometimes it's difficult to get him back inside. If I keep him inside, his whines turn into yips, then quiet barks, then full-throated panic-ridden rargs. He wakes up the people who are on different shifts in the house.

    So my question is... Should I let him out as soon as he starts whining to go out? Every time I say no, the noises he makes get louder. I don't want this to turn into a bad habit, which is why I try let him out before it gets to the panic bark. If he gets loud, I try to distract him, but there isn't much I can do - quietly. He has no interest in non-food toys. The laser pointer works for a bit, but it sounds like a herd of cows running through the house when he chases it.

    If I let him out, I risk pissing off the neighbors.

    Would obedience training work for territorial barking?

    Help!

  2. #2
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Jewel's Avatar

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    Default

    He sounds like he's under-stimulated. He's right at the age where they finally have full coordination and are really starting to feel their strength and bursting with energy. If he's not neutered, he is also starting to feel the hormones kicking in. The barking may go down a notch in a couple of months - many pups go through a crazy barking period when they first find their voices. After that initial period, they can be a bit more judicious about barking but can still be enough to drive the neighbors crazy.

    Based on the description of your situation, I think regardless of whether you let him out when he first demands to go or you wait until he's worked up, he's going to drive either the neighbors or the people inside your home crazy. You can work with the barking to an extent by acknowledging the bark and thank him for it and ask him to quiet down. But if he's full of energy, it would be much harder to ask him to hold back his reactions. Obedience training can help, but, again, ultimately a young dog with excess energy is usually difficult to control.

    You might want to try really really really really tire him out physically and see if it makes a difference. Where you are it is probably too cold to be outside for an extended period of time right now. Can you see if there are doggie daycare you can take him to?

  3. #3
    Puppy (New Member)

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    Default

    Thanks. I agree that he's understimulated. He tries to play with our other dogs, but he's still awkward and clumsy. Body parts get stepped on and he gets snapped at. I guess we just have to wait for this phase to pass. Yay.

  4. #4
    Old Dawg (Senior Member)

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    Fort Worth
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    Default

    Can you teach him to ring a bell to go out? We did that with ours, and he now thinks that's how to say "let me out." So he never barks or whines, he just obnoxiously beats on the bell and gives dirty looks if we don't comply with his demand. He also sometimes doesn't like to come back in, so if it's rainy or muddy and he was out 2 minutes ago, we will tell him no. The angry bell ring is quieter than a barky temper tantrum.

  5. #5
    Young Dawg (Member)

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    Minnesota
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    Default

    An idea from Patricia McConnell’s “the other end of the leash” (recommended on this thread, I purchased, it’s great!!)... this is something she did with her dog (I believe the GP) - whenever dog would bark, she would go outside or help “inspect” whatever dog was barking at, if it could be ascertained. Then she would heavily praise the dog when she “discovered” said target, indicating to pup that the dog’s bark was an effective alert and the job was done. This tended to conclude the barking session as pup was satisfied that her person was aware of whatever was meriting the barking. Sounds like your pup is trying to do her “job,” and you might try effectively validating that work and see if that helps. Eg, go in the yard with her and look over the fence or whatever, and praise her/him for alerting you. I know it sounds like you’re encouraging her, but the praise comes once you “discover” what she’s alerting you to, not the bark per se.

    Just a thought! I’m learning what a STUBBORN breed these dogs are, but how incredibly rewarding it is when you learn to work as a team. Telling her NO or yelling (aaaah my DH) is totally ineffective, but positive reinforcement so far has worked the best. It’s incredible how much we’ve bonded in this way with just our 12 week old, I can’t wait until she’s matured!

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