Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Young Dawg (Member)

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    10

    Default Litter mates female on male aggression 5 months old

    I have had a mixed Pyr before and he was very much the typical Pyr in nature and looks. Our only issue was night barking and we worked that out by bringing him in at night. Problem basically solved. However I adopted a male and female at 8 weeks who are siblings and they are mixed though the male looks very Pyr. He is much larger than the female but she has attacked him on 2 different occasions where she drew blood. He tends to hold her off but does not seem to want to hurt her but she seems to feel very differently and seems very aggressive and does not stop.

    When does it happen? When I am not around, like inside the house. I have been able to handle feeding them so that aggression there has stopped over food. I think that they do get nasty about bones and sticks in the yard that they like but this extreme aggression seems different. I literally feel like she could kill him if he was not so much bigger and she had her full teeth in.

    I am on 3 acres and they are allowed to roam the property when I am home (totally fenced 3 acres in the woods surrounded by the same). I bring them in at night. They are in a 8'x10' kennel when I am at work (about 9 hours/day). Today I left her in and him out thinking that I can alternate them now that they are older. I was worried they might get eaten by coyotes as there are many around and they can find ways in but the pups are at 50 lbs now so I am ok leaving one out during day.

    Any other suggestions? She looks different that a Pyr somewhat, the coloring of a Saint Bernard and a much higher strung temperment than a Pyr. Looking on the internet, the closest LGB that she resembles in appearance is probably an Alentejo Mastiff.

    I would love to keep them both but also realize that this may be an important time for her to bond with another family if they can't live together. Suggestions greatly welcomed.

    Thank you.
    Gari

  2. #2
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Jewel's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    4,947
      Jewel`s Photos

    Default

    without knowing what is triggering her attacks it is difficult to opine much. But it is very unusual, and worrisome, for a 5 month old to so aggressive as to to attack an opposite gender sibling and drawing blood.

    I think perhaps on your next day off from work, put them in the kennel and see if you can catch her attacking him. You can't really know what to do if you have no idea what is triggering the attacks. Maybe she's a bit off, but without observing the circumstance you also can't rule out if he's doing something to provoke her reaction.

  3. #3
    Young Dawg (Member)

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    10

    Default

    Thank you Jewel. It happens so infrequently that I might wait days to see it BUT I am going to try to begin to observe them more often and see if I can find what is triggering. I did note last night that when I got home yesterday, the female was drying to dominate the male as soon as I let her out. I was able to address it with firmness and redirection and she responded well and no further issues. She came in for the night and he chose to stay outside and everyone seems good.
    I believe what is triggering her is the fight over items in the yard (bones, sticks, chew toys so they don'e eat the water hoses) and in their development she is exercising her more aggressive/dominant nature. I am not a big fan of aggressive dogs hence I chose the Pyr but I do love her very much and we are bonded so maybe I need to learn how to train and handle that with more skill than I have.

    Any reading suggestions for this?

    Again, thank you! They are both adorable and wonderful beings.

    Gari

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Screenshot 2018-12-01 at 7.35.32 AM.jpg 
Views:	29 
Size:	19.4 KB 
ID:	10053

    Quote Originally Posted by Jewel View Post
    without knowing what is triggering her attacks it is difficult to opine much. But it is very unusual, and worrisome, for a 5 month old to so aggressive as to to attack an opposite gender sibling and drawing blood.

    I think perhaps on your next day off from work, put them in the kennel and see if you can catch her attacking him. You can't really know what to do if you have no idea what is triggering the attacks. Maybe she's a bit off, but without observing the circumstance you also can't rule out if he's doing something to provoke her reaction.

  4. #4
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Jewel's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    4,947
      Jewel`s Photos

    Default

    Your girl has a masked faced, that is not all that uncommon in pyrs. My Ren is heavily masked as well and I know for certain he is purebred pyr. The two in my avatar were the predecessors of Ren. Ren was born with a heavy mask: Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_3961.jpg 
Views:	10 
Size:	52.6 KB 
ID:	10055 Ren's mask has lightened up now that he's two, but most of it is still there.

    Typically we recommend books by Patricia McConnell who is a renowned PhD expert on dog behavior and who also has had two pyrs.

  5. #5
    Young Dawg (Member)

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jewel View Post
    Your girl has a masked faced, that is not all that uncommon in pyrs. My Ren is heavily masked as well and I know for certain he is purebred pyr. The two in my avatar were the predecessors of Ren. Ren was born with a heavy mask: Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_3961.jpg 
Views:	10 
Size:	52.6 KB 
ID:	10055 Ren's mask has lightened up now that he's two, but most of it is still there.

    Typically we recommend books by Patricia McConnell who is a renowned PhD expert on dog behavior and who also has had two pyrs.
    Thank you very much! I have read a little of her work but will dig in deeper here. My last Pyr had a mask but she also has very dark pinto horse like markings and her coat and build are a bit different but she is absolutely lovely. Just very different than her brother and my last Pyr and maybe that is some because she is female.

    I feel so grateful to have her and her brother. I just don't want them to kill each other eventually. I will work on being more diligent about observing their behavior and keeping them apart when I am not home until I have a better understanding of how to prevent the extreme fights.

    Gari

  6. #6
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) SebastiansMom's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    2,434

    Default

    I second the Patricia McConnell recommendation. I would recommend starting with For the Love of a Dog, as it focuses on dogs’ emotions and body language. There is also a great app for your phone/tablet that helps with learning canine body language. It is called Dog Decoder.

    Chester, my non-Pyr, has had issues with fear-based aggression toward other dogs. Once I learned to read his body language better, I was able to see when other dogs were making him uncomfortable, and remove him from the situation before he acted out. One day when he was triggered by a combination of the weather and Sebastian’s barking, I was able to diffuse the situation by having Chester come to me for treats and petting before Chester did anything he would surely have regretted.
    Sebastian is on Facebook!
    www.facebook.com/SirSaintSebastian

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •