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  1. #1
    Puppy (New Member)

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

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    Default Food Agression (only in certain circumstances)

    Hi, I am new to this site and I am sure this has been discussed many times but I am at a loss as to what to do without going through 12 hours of pages and discussions. We recently got a new puppy in the household she is a pyr/ausie cross (Nala) and very very active. We have a 4-5 year old rescue pyr (Wilbur) we got from our local shelter. As I get to know this breed more I realize that he was just a puppy when we got him instead of the 2 year + old we were told he was. I am thinking closer to a year old then 2 at this point. He was in our household alone for 2 +years and in early November of last year we got Nala. At first the food issue was just me trying to prevent him from eating her puppy food and her eating his adult dog food. Now I think I have created a HUGE issue. He absolutely goes nuts if his food dish is within her reach or she is even close to it (even if it is empty). To the point of tonight he put her to the floor and has his mouth around her throat. I do feed them seperately now since I was trying to prevent one from eating the others food that wasn't for them. I think in the end I have caused this issue. When we went to visit the family over the holidays there was 4 dogs sharing a bowl of food and no issues. What can I do to fix this? Is there anything? I don't want him to end up hurting her or me or the new puppy we are getting this weekend. We are rescuing another pyr from a bad situation. Any help please would be greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance.

  2. #2
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) nick's spirit's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

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    Default

    Welcome, and sorry you are having to deal with this situation....
    my only advice is to feed them in separate rooms, no bowls down except a water bowl....I do know of another person with multiple male Pyrs who feeds all of her dogs in their own crates....I don't think you'll be able to do that, unless you start it with Nala & the new pup...
    I'm not sure why you think you caused this situation...

    Is Wilbur neutered?

    It may be that their bowls are too close together for him...can you feed in different rooms?

    Pyrs tend to only use as much force as needed in a situation, Nala may not have been getting his signals to stay farther away from his bowl, so putting her in her place was his only other option

  3. #3
    Puppy (New Member)

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

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    Default

    Thank you for answering. I don't have crates but it may be I will have to get them if it continues on. I do feed them in seperate rooms right now. On occasion I forget to pick up the bowls before I let them both in the same room. Wilbur is not neutered but I believe that is coming very soon as I will have 2 females going into heats. I was going to breed him since he is such a good dog, but over the last year I have realized there are far to many great pyrs out there that need rescuing. So that is the route I am going to go. Thanks again. I will just have to be more diligent in making sure bowls are put away before entering rooms.

  4. #4
    Young Dawg (Member)

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

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    Dec 2017
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    SC
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 3Pyrfamily View Post
    Thank you for answering. I don't have crates but it may be I will have to get them if it continues on. I do feed them in seperate rooms right now. On occasion I forget to pick up the bowls before I let them both in the same room. Wilbur is not neutered but I believe that is coming very soon as I will have 2 females going into heats. I was going to breed him since he is such a good dog, but over the last year I have realized there are far to many great pyrs out there that need rescuing. So that is the route I am going to go. Thanks again. I will just have to be more diligent in making sure bowls are put away before entering rooms.
    First a huge THANK YOU for realizing that a new litter of GP pups is the last thing needed when there are many WONDERFUL GPs in need of rescue all over. As far as the food situation...I have 2 big girls. Bloodhound and GP both pure bred rescues. Let me tell you nothing is more intense of terrifying than females going at it. Males only use force needed but females fight dirty. Especially when dog pack status hasn't been established. Feed them separately. There is nothing wrong with this. However be sure they are not food agressive towards YOU. YOU should be able to pick the bowl up if they are finished or not. First test should be done with a broomstick to pull the bowl away. Not your hand. If they are resistant reply with the proper firm correction coming from a place of confidence...NOT striking or anger. Work from there. GPs are SMART. Yours will learn the lesson quick. I went so far as to when collecting the bowl when testing mine to bring the bowl to my face and with a hand pretend to eat some. Your GP needs to know you are the boss and if you want some yummies you are entitled because you are alpha. I did this same thing when treat or chew or bone possessive or aggression is shown. Between the dogs honestly they usually settle things. I agree GP will normally only use necessary force. My problem was I had two females that were same size and one there was an alpha vaccuum after my beloved male GP mix Cubby died. Lordy do female dogs fight dirty. Hope this helps. Questions just ask.

  5. #5
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) SebastiansMom's Avatar

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    Dominance Theory, or the idea that humans must maintain “Alpha” status over their dogs, is based on highly faulty WWII-era research of captive wolves. The TL;DR is that the researchers took a bunch of unrelated wolves, who never would have lived together in the wild, and placed them in an enclosure that was far smaller than a wild wolf pack territory would be. When the wolves started fighting one another, the researchers decided, without any real evidence, that the wolves were fighting for status. Then, they decided that misbehaving dogs must also be driven to misbehave in a desire for elevated status. The thing is, dogs aren’t wolves. Also, the captive wolves in the study weren’t driven to fight out of a desire to elevate their status, they were fighting for resources. This was learned when subsequent researchers were finally able to study wolves in their natural habitat, and found that wolves lead a much more peaceful existence in the wild than the captive wolves did during that study.

    Dominance Theory has been debunked time and time and time again, and still, people continue to cling to it, the same way some groups continue to claim that the Earth is flat. Science be darned.

    Chester, my non-Pyr had some mild to moderate Resource Guarding issues when he first came to live with us. He gets all of his meals and high-value, long-lasting treats (doggie ice cream, bones, and long lasting chews, etc.) in his crate. Not only does this prevent unwanted squabbles from arising, it also helps Chester feel secure in knowing that he doesn’t have to guard these things. His behavior overall has improved a miraculous amount since those early days, and while he still gets brand new bones in his crate, after they have been chewed on for a few days, the bones are able to enter the general bone population - to be enjoyed wherever by whomever.

    Dr. Patricia McConnell is a true expert in animal behavior, and has a lot of valuable, science-based information available to the public on her website. Here is a link to several articles dealing with Resource Guarding:
    http://www.patriciamcconnell.com/node/214

    Hopefully, you find the articles as helpful as i have in the past.
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