Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1
    Puppy (New Member) Larryt's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Carbondale, CO US
    Posts
    6
      Larryt`s Photos

    Lightbulb 4 year old Pyr/Anatolian reluctant to return home from walk.

    Our family recently adopted a 4 year old Pyrénées/Anatolian. Prior to coming to us she had been a LGD on a small ranch. We had been without a dog for several years so when the opportunity arose we decided to take on the responsibility of caring for and giving a home to this wonderful, loving creature. From what we could discover Bianca, (our name for her), had been in 3 other homes. There’s more background but I want to talk about the issue we are having.
    We live in a subdivision where we are able to walk her on leash. We have a pretty small fenced area where she can hang out. Whenever we are at home and try to take her out on a walk she will start out fine but when it’s time to turn around and come home she will be very obstinate and stop dead. Sometimes she will just lay down in the street. Of course we have learned to be patient but it seems impractical to take an hour for a 20 minute walk. The only strategy I can come up with that works, is to lure her home using treats as “bread crumbs” for her to follow. I’m wondering if anyone knows of a strategy to use to help us get her home.
    We are able to take her to a dog park where she is able to be off leash but it is impractical for us to get there without driving. Initially we had presumed that she could never be off leash but have been surprised at how social and friendly she is to both humans and other dogs. The loop we walk at the park is about a mile. I’m wondering if that’s enough exercise for a 4 year old.

  2. #2
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) mikelg84's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Ann Arbor, Michigan
    Posts
    209

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Larryt View Post
    Our family recently adopted a 4 year old Pyrénées/Anatolian. Prior to coming to us she had been a LGD on a small ranch. We had been without a dog for several years so when the opportunity arose we decided to take on the responsibility of caring for and giving a home to this wonderful, loving creature. From what we could discover Bianca, (our name for her), had been in 3 other homes. There’s more background but I want to talk about the issue we are having.
    We live in a subdivision where we are able to walk her on leash. We have a pretty small fenced area where she can hang out. Whenever we are at home and try to take her out on a walk she will start out fine but when it’s time to turn around and come home she will be very obstinate and stop dead. Sometimes she will just lay down in the street. Of course we have learned to be patient but it seems impractical to take an hour for a 20 minute walk. The only strategy I can come up with that works, is to lure her home using treats as “bread crumbs” for her to follow. I’m wondering if anyone knows of a strategy to use to help us get her home.
    We are able to take her to a dog park where she is able to be off leash but it is impractical for us to get there without driving. Initially we had presumed that she could never be off leash but have been surprised at how social and friendly she is to both humans and other dogs. The loop we walk at the park is about a mile. I’m wondering if that’s enough exercise for a 4 year old.
    This is a very common behavior among puppies and dogs that have been LGDs and don't have the habit of going for walks. Eventually, Bianca will grow out of it. This whole walking on a leash thing is probably something new to her despite being 4 years old. My dog, who happens to be a GP/Anatolian mix, didn't do great at the beginning. I didn't use treats while we were walking, but I did give her some great treats at the end of our walks, once we were home. "You don't want to move? Fine! I'm going home and you're not getting a treat".

    GP/Anatolian mix don't need a lot of of exercise. If you can add a few trips to the dog park (does she like car rides?) once in a while, a mile a day, and some play time at home or outside in the yard, I'm sure she will be very happy!

  3. #3
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Jewel's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    4,913
      Jewel`s Photos

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Larryt View Post
    when it’s time to turn around and come home she will be very obstinate and stop dead. Sometimes she will just lay down in the street. Of course we have learned to be patient but it seems impractical to take an hour for a 20 minute walk.
    Alas, Ren...

    This...
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	fullsizeoutput_2b9.jpg 
Views:	32 
Size:	22.9 KB 
ID:	10016

    this...
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_5252.jpg 
Views:	33 
Size:	98.9 KB 
ID:	10015

    here we were directly across the street from our house...
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_6652.jpg 
Views:	38 
Size:	70.2 KB 
ID:	10017

    he's actually plopped down right in the middle of the street a few times. didn't have time to snap photos on those occasions as I was otherwise occupied peeling him off the ground to save our lives...

    He's done this since he was a baby. He's now 2 and still pulls this stunt probably 3 or 4 times a week. He can be very opinionated about which direction we should go. Ren is still young and so if I laugh at his antics and play with him, he usually would get up and keep going. But we go a good distance, 3-4 miles every morning, so he gets his exercise.

    Perhaps you can have a harness on Bianca when you walk her. A simple traditional harness that will give you a better grip to pull her up if she plops down. If she stops, can you walk her in a different direction and if she's good about going in a different direction, get her walking then make a arc to head back the original direction you want to go. Also, maybe Bianca just wants to be out for an hour instead of 20 minutes. These guys were bred to wander so they need to have that side of their nature adequately addressed. walking and being out drains their mental energy.

  4. #4
    Puppy (New Member) Larryt's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Carbondale, CO US
    Posts
    6
      Larryt`s Photos

    Default

    Ren’s behavior is almost exactly what Bianca does. My neighbor suggested that I get a sled or wagon to bring her home in except it should be the other way round. I guess what I’m hearing is less treats and more patience. We have been using a harness which has helped a lot still doesn’t get her moving any faster. I’ve noticed a big difference in the way she behaves off lead opposed to on lead. I will try to get some photos posted. Thanks for replying!

  5. #5
    Puppy (New Member)

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    Foresthill, California
    Posts
    2

    Default

    Oh Larryt, you're living my life. We adopted a 3 year old, 125 lb pyrenees x black lab mix? from a nice family who were his only owners. He's fabulous and gorgeous but he has a few shall we say idiosyncrasies. Murray just stops in the middle of the street sits or lays down and has no interest in moving. He came to us with a prong style collar and I've used when walking around our rural neighborhood with hardly any traffic thank goodness. Yesterday was a eye-rolling embarrassing funny nightmare. We took him to the vet for a follow up ear check and he was fine when we got there but on our way out ... he sat down for a about a minute and didn't want to leave. Then we got out to the parking lot and there was an empty space on one side of our van and he sat down again and refused to get in. I went to the other side and opened the door so maybe I could lure him in with some treats, but he just laid down in the middle of the parking place like the sub compact car that he is. Right outside the window at our longtime vets, several staff members and eventually the vet came out to offer assistance and encouragement. I tried everything including waving a rotisserie chicken and offering him pieces of it in addition to dog treats. One of the vet techs tried lifting up his back end once he sat up and he snarled at her. Finally after 20 minutes he gave in when the vet tech slipped a slip lead on him and got in the car. Next time I'm ready to find a vet who'll make a house call. This plunking down and refusing to go where you want him to go is equal parts funny and frustrating. On the couple of occasions he has escaped our 2 acre property he just keeps going (not very fast). I know he hears me but he is clearly not "listening" Anybody with suggestions or advice would be so helpful. Thanks in advance. Attachment 10025

  6. #6
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Jewel's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    4,913
      Jewel`s Photos

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Larryt View Post
    I guess what I’m hearing is less treats and more patience.
    More paptience, yes, but if treats work I would not cut that out. I carry treats when we walk him on weekends. Admittedly Ren most definitely takes advantage of that by deliberately stopping just to score treats. I indulge him since it’s just Sat & Sun that I would carry treats. But sometimes treats don’t work either...

    I offered him freeze dried lamb and he still wouldn’t move and didn’t care when I put it on his nose...
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	BC1A8530-03A6-4D96-9AB0-7619AB783C30.jpg 
Views:	16 
Size:	22.3 KB 
ID:	10026

    One thing I’ve tried is to ask Ren where he wanted to go when he refused to go the way I want. It works sometimes.

  7. #7
    Puppy (New Member) Larryt's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Carbondale, CO US
    Posts
    6
      Larryt`s Photos

    Default

    Hi Murraysmom. I think that the behavior you have described is a common trait for these dogs. I just got back from a walk with our Pyr/Anatolian, Bianca, and have found the following:
    She does not like being on a line or lead although she will reluctantly accept that.
    She is very difficult at times to get turned back to home if we are on a walk in the neighborhood.
    If she doesn't want to come home she will "auger" in to the ground and refuse to move till she's ready (and its hard to wait her out if the temperature is in the single digits!)
    Being outside for her is natural even if it's -5.
    What I have found is that she will eventually respond to my wishes if I grab her harness/vest handle and lift her up. I have been more forceful with her lately and she seems somewhat more likely to respond favorably. ie-returning home. my wife and I are still very much in the learning stages with this Bianca character. The Vest/Harness we got for Bianca has made all the difference in our being able to handle her. We haven't tried any to the training type collars.
    One of the big questions we have high now is , "are we doing the right thing" in keeping this animal as a pet in a home that while not an apartment, is still fairly restrictive for a LGD. Sometimes she seems bored or even depressed but so far this observed behavior has not resulted in her not wanting to eat or play or go the the dog park.

  8. #8
    Young Dawg (Member)

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Larryt View Post
    Our family recently adopted a 4 year old Pyrénées/Anatolian. Prior to coming to us she had been a LGD on a small ranch. We had been without a dog for several years so when the opportunity arose we decided to take on the responsibility of caring for and giving a home to this wonderful, loving creature. From what we could discover Bianca, (our name for her), had been in 3 other homes. There’s more background but I want to talk about the issue we are having.
    We live in a subdivision where we are able to walk her on leash. We have a pretty small fenced area where she can hang out. Whenever we are at home and try to take her out on a walk she will start out fine but when it’s time to turn around and come home she will be very obstinate and stop dead. Sometimes she will just lay down in the street. Of course we have learned to be patient but it seems impractical to take an hour for a 20 minute walk. The only strategy I can come up with that works, is to lure her home using treats as “bread crumbs” for her to follow. I’m wondering if anyone knows of a strategy to use to help us get her home.
    We are able to take her to a dog park where she is able to be off leash but it is impractical for us to get there without driving. Initially we had presumed that she could never be off leash but have been surprised at how social and friendly she is to both humans and other dogs. The loop we walk at the park is about a mile. I’m wondering if that’s enough exercise for a 4 year old.
    Treat at the arrival back home will teach her that going home gains the reward. Also, GP are VERY smart. I would argue she doesn't want the walk to end and knows how much dead weight she can be lol. PASSIVE AGGRESSIVE lolol its like hey I am not fighting you actively but come move this 80lbs of dead weight. Hahaha one of my Cubbys favorite tricks. Bianca is just testing you. Welcome to the breed ;p

  9. #9
    Young Dawg (Member)

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Larryt View Post
    Hi Murraysmom. I think that the behavior you have described is a common trait for these dogs. I just got back from a walk with our Pyr/Anatolian, Bianca, and have found the following:
    She does not like being on a line or lead although she will reluctantly accept that.
    She is very difficult at times to get turned back to home if we are on a walk in the neighborhood.
    If she doesn't want to come home she will "auger" in to the ground and refuse to move till she's ready (and its hard to wait her out if the temperature is in the single digits!)
    Being outside for her is natural even if it's -5.
    What I have found is that she will eventually respond to my wishes if I grab her harness/vest handle and lift her up. I have been more forceful with her lately and she seems somewhat more likely to respond favorably. ie-returning home. my wife and I are still very much in the learning stages with this Bianca character. The Vest/Harness we got for Bianca has made all the difference in our being able to handle her. We haven't tried any to the training type collars.
    One of the big questions we have high now is , "are we doing the right thing" in keeping this animal as a pet in a home that while not an apartment, is still fairly restrictive for a LGD. Sometimes she seems bored or even depressed but so far this observed behavior has not resulted in her not wanting to eat or play or go the the dog park.
    They dont need a lot of exercise compared to a Husky. Just keep her stimulated and playing and lots of love and trust me you can be certain you are doing the right thing.

  10. #10
    Young Dawg (Member)

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jewel View Post
    More paptience, yes, but if treats work I would not cut that out. I carry treats when we walk him on weekends. Admittedly Ren most definitely takes advantage of that by deliberately stopping just to score treats. I indulge him since it’s just Sat & Sun that I would carry treats. But sometimes treats don’t work either...

    I offered him freeze dried lamb and he still wouldn’t move and didn’t care when I put it on his nose...
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	BC1A8530-03A6-4D96-9AB0-7619AB783C30.jpg 
Views:	16 
Size:	22.3 KB 
ID:	10026

    One thing I’ve tried is to ask Ren where he wanted to go when he refused to go the way I want. It works sometimes.
    ROFL YOU KNOW IT'S RENS WORLD AND YOU ARE JUST LIVING IN IT? LOL I love stories like this. The breed is just awesome. Not your typical dog ;p

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •