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  1. #1
    Puppy (New Member) tajima's Avatar

    Prospective Great Pyrenees Owner

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    Default Can a GP live in a condo?

    I live in a 2 story, 3 bedroom, 2 bath condo (I'm mentioning this solely to give an idea on the size of where I live) and I'm wondering if a Great Pyrenees can live comfortably in an home like this? I know they're big dogs but I have a LOT of space since I'm the only person who lives here. I've seen people talk about how well their own GPs live well in their apartments or how other people have seen them live comfortably, I figured since where I live is bigger than an apartment it shouldn't be too much of an issue (at least space-wise) but I still wanna get other opinions on this...

  2. #2
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) mikelg84's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by tajima View Post
    I live in a 2 story, 3 bedroom, 2 bath condo (I'm mentioning this solely to give an idea on the size of where I live) and I'm wondering if a Great Pyrenees can live comfortably in an home like this? I know they're big dogs but I have a LOT of space since I'm the only person who lives here. I've seen people talk about how well their own GPs live well in their apartments or how other people have seen them live comfortably, I figured since where I live is bigger than an apartment it shouldn't be too much of an issue (at least space-wise) but I still wanna get other opinions on this...
    My neighbors have a beautiful female GP and they live in a condo. She's the cutest and happiest GP I've ever seen. Scout is her name. She's always looking through the window and when she sees me and my dog pass by, she gets SO excited. I've watched her on several occasions and she doesn't seem like a dog that needs to roam around 10 acres. I have a fenced yard and every time I take Scout to my house to play with my half pyr, Scot prefers to be inside with the adults, while my dog will be outside digging or killing my flowers and trees and chasing rabbits.

    So, in my opinion, dogs adapt to whatever conditions they have to adapt. Scout goes for 3 or 4 long walks every day and their parents always make sure that she gets enough exercise. A dog needs love, not acres. Almost every day I get to see a very happy GP that roams around a condo and also explore the outside world 3-4 times a day. So my answer to you would be that if you're willing to keep your dog active and daily stimulated, I don't see why you can't have a happy pyr in your condo. Your dog will find a way to fulfill its instincts of protecting you and your house. Some pyrs look after goats, some look after people.
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  3. #3
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) SebastiansMom's Avatar

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    I’ve had Sebastian in two separate apartments, and now a townhouse. For him, the issue wasn’t so much the amount of indoor living space, but instead how many other dogs he had to “share his territory” with.

    Our first apartment was tiny, two-story apartment in a building that had 12 units total. We were in a fairly urban, walkable neighborhood, with lots of shops and restaurants close by. There was also quite a bit of green space. He did pretty well in that apartment, but he was also still very much a puppy.

    When Sebastian was 2, we moved to a slightly larger apartment in a complex with hundreds of units, and lots of other dogs. He started developing behavioral issues a little over six months later. Now, part of that could be due to maturity (when it started, he was at an age where some Pyrs naturally become less tolerant of other dogs).

    Right before Sebastian’s 4th Birthday, we moved to our current house. He and my other dog have a small, fenced-in yard that they don’t have to share, and they seem to be far more calm and comfortable in their own skin. I would definitely say that their behavior indicates that they are far happier now than they were in our last apartment. I also like not having to get suited up when it’s 3am and someone REALLY needs to go potty.

    We’re on an end unit, on a corner lot, so we only have to share one wall with a neighbor. He swears that he doesn’t hear Sebastian bark very often, which I find hard to believe. However, the barking is something to consider. In the apartments, I had to be very diligent about keeping him as quiet as possible, which is not an easy task. Most Pyrs like to bark a lot. I was lucky that for the most part, my neighbors liked dogs - otherwise, I would have been in big trouble.

    If you decide to give it a try, I would urge you to consider adopting an adult Pyr with a personality that is a good fit for you and your living situation. Puppies are cute, but it’s hard to know what their adult personalities are going to be like. If the adult Pyr ends up not being a great fit for condo life, then things get a bit difficult.
    Sebastian is on Facebook!
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  4. #4
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Jewel's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

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    The indoor square footage isn't the big issue, it's how much time you are willing to devote to adequately address the dog's energy outlet needs.

    Our house is tiny, no bigger than most 2 bedroom apartments. We have a yard, not very big, but enough to run around a little. Ren gets a walk every morning 3 to 4 miles. I've been working with him to jog most of that. Ren is not super high energy so the morning walk/jog plus a bit of rough housing after we come home from work is adequate for him.

    While my current adolescent isn't super high energy, his aunt before him was. Bijou, the one on the left of my avatar pic was high spirited. Luckily we had Bro, one on the right. Bro was only 1/2 pyr and had much higher energy than average pyrs so he could match her energy level. They were able to play in the backyard to drain energy.

    If you would have to hand walk your dog, then I would be selective about choosing a puppy that is on the lower energy side.

    I would also second SM's caution about barking. Most of them bark and they are LOUD.

  5. #5
    Puppy (New Member)

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    I also found this to be true. Our GP never had an issue with the relatively small apartment, as long as she got enough outside time.

  6. #6
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) CaseysMom's Avatar

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    I've never lived in a condo with Casey, but my house is just over 1000s.f. and the houses are very close together. We've just moved into a similar house in the same neighborhood & I've met two of my three neighbors. Both of them say they don't mind the barking. Don't know about the third neighbor yet. The woman behind me catches, spays/neuters and releases cats, so that was a challenge for the first few days!

    And I agree with everyone else; the barking is very LOUD! I work from home part-time, so I'm able to walk both dogs and let them run in the backyard, but when I'm working all day in my office they go to daycare, and at the end of the day I pick up two tired, very happy pups.

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