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  1. #11
    Puppy (New Member)

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

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    Oct 2018
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    Wisconsin
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    The Pitbull could have bit through the Pyrs mane.



    I just think you should have the woman (who has a lot on her plate without losing her dog either to her dogs aggression or yours) and you take your dogs to a neutral area on leashes and not let them come head to head...the humans should ignore the other dogs and just talk in relaxed tones to their dogs and then leave...do this again, and again, until the dogs are comfortable but not so hyper interested in each other...this might seem difficult, or boring, or a chore...but isn't it better that your dogs don't kill each other?

    I was scared of pits because of stories until I lived next to one.

  2. #12
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) SebastiansMom's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

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    Quote Originally Posted by girlhug View Post
    The Pitbull could have bit through the Pyrs mane.

    I was scared of pits because of stories until I lived next to one.
    Absolutely, the American Bulldog (which, again, is not a Pitbull, but I’ll get more into that in a moment), COULD have bitten through the Pyr’s mane. However, he inhibited his bite, which tells me that the American Bulldog was not out to hurt the Pyr, he was simply trying to tell the Pyr to keep out of his territory. Again, dogs don’t understand the concept of having an easement.

    The degree to which a dog inhibits his bite during a fight or attack says a lot about the dog’s state of mind leading up to and during the event. A highly inhibited bite says that the dog is fully in control of his actions, and is trying to communicate rather than do physical harm. A dog who is unable to inhibit his bite is in such a state of high emotional arousal (meaning he is so angry or scared, and usually it’s scared) that he loses control of his actions. These are the dogs that leave one or more deep puncture wounds, and are the most dangerous.

    There is even a scale to rate the severity of bites. You can read about it here:
    https://drsophiayin.com/blog/entry/w...evels-in-dogs/

    A lot of people are scared of pit bulls, thanks to the wealth of misinformation about them that is readily available about them on the internet. Websites such as https://www.dogsbite.org/dangerous-dogs.php would have you believe that these dogs are ruthless vicious killing machines. In fairness, some are. In more fairness, most aren’t. However, this site and others like it promote the idea that one “breed” (because, to them, the pitbull breed group is all one breed) is responsible for a staggeringly high percentage of serious dog-related injuries and deaths in the US. What they don’t tell you is that they have no evidence to support that the dogs responsible for these attacks are even pitbulls at all. There are at least 25 breeds of dogs that are commonly mistaken for pitbull-type dogs - American Bulldogs, Boerboels, Cane Corsos, Presa Cararios, Olde English Bulldogges, Black Mouth Curs, even Dogue Du Bordeauxs and Boxers - and that’s just naming a few. Over the Summer, I had to take Sebastian to the Emergency Vet for a knee injury. The vet on duty told me that there was absolutely no way that Chester wasn’t a pitbull. I had just gotten his DNA test results back, and they say that he is nearly anything BUT a pitbull. The “pitbulls” responsible for the awful attacks cited by these websites and organizations rely on eyewitness accounts to identify the attacking dogs as pitbulls. Several studies have shown that it is difficult even for people who are familiar with a number of different dog breeds, to accurately identify the breeds that comprise a mixed-breed dog’s heritage on looks alone. If that dog is short-haired and stocky, there is a good chance that he will be labeled a pitbull. Given this information, there is a very good chance that the actual percentage of pitbull-type dogs responsible for injurious and fatal attacks in the US is much lower than the statistics claimed by these groups. This is why I am so adamant about making the distinction between the American Bulldog and the pitbull breeds. While all four groups share the German bullbaiting Bullenbeisser as an ancestor, the pitbull breeds were developed by crossing the descendants of those bulldogs with terriers.
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