Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Results 31 to 40 of 40
  1. #31
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) SebastiansMom's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    2,362

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brayjj View Post
    We were thinking putting wall hooks into the house walls, and getting our dog used to being hooked to it on his dog bed. Then bring the other dog, up, and get him used to being on his dog bed, tied to the wall... then slowly, put them in the same room, they will both be tied, in seperate locations (our home is really small), but then they can see eachother in the home, each have their "own space". With having small children, I think that may be the best solution with getting them both to the same floor. Everything is real baby steps.
    If you are going to do something like this, I would suggest starting with both dogs outside - one adult holding the Pyr boy, one adult holding the GSD boy, and no kiddos around. I would have the dogs close enough that they can recognize one another, but far enough away that neither boy is close to going over threshold. I would pair this exercise with lots of upbeat happy talk ďYay! Itís your brother! We love your brother! Heís so good, and youíre so good for not trying to rip his throat out! Yay! I love you sweet boy, and I love your brother, too!Ē I would also supply each dog with a jackpot of super high-value treats. A little fruit-cup sized Ziploc container with about 1/4 can of wet food has helped me perform near-miracles at my house. The important thing here is that they see each other, THEN they get the treats. Once they are done with the treats, the exercise is over.
    Slowly, decrease the distance between them, then work on taking your GSD inside while your Pyr boy watches and is treated. Eventually try and work your way up to short intervals inside the house. If it looks like a boy is going to go over threshold, increase distance. If either boy goes over threshold, end the session immediately, and go back a few steps for the next dayís session. Of course, when youíre doing these exercises, the kids should be somewhere else. I would also wear an overcoat and work gloves to help protect you in case of a redirected bite.

    When it comes to going to the vet, I call the vetís office from the parking lot, tell them Iím there, and ask them to have someone come out to the car and get us when they have an exam room ready for us. If anyone is in the waiting room, they will bring us in through the side door.

    On her website, Patricia McConnel has a DVD series about treating Dog Aggression. I have not seen it, so I have no idea how helpful it would be. If youíre interested, here is the link: https://www.patriciamcconnell.com/st...ivity-DVD.html

    There is also a wealth of information in the Reading Room section of her website.
    Sebastian is on Facebook!
    www.facebook.com/SirSaintSebastian

  2. #32
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Jewel's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    4,815
      Jewel`s Photos

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brayjj View Post
    My son got near him with the stick and he growled at him too. When he did that all I did was say his name. He knew he did wrong, because he put his head down and looked at me, but now I have to be on guard for that as well.
    If you can even find the time, try working on trade up with him. When you see him with a stick, go and offer him high value treat and see if he would trade his stick for it. When you first try this, offer him the treat, if he wants to take it, use the treat to lure him away from the stick, then maneuver to put your foot over the stick and let him have the treat. Then give him back the his stick. You don't want to offer the treat and try to reach for the stick with the other hand because that could trigger a resource guarding response and you risk your arm betting bit. Using your body/foot to claim the stick is less threatening because you aren't sticking your hand in his face. You are trying to teach him that someone being close to him and his stick is a GOOD thing and giving up the stick is a GOOD thing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Brayjj View Post
    We were thinking putting wall hooks into the house walls, and getting our dog used to being hooked to it on his dog bed. Then bring the other dog, up, and get him used to being on his dog bed, tied to the wall... then slowly, put them in the same room, they will both be tied, in seperate locations (our home is really small), but then they can see eachother in the home, each have their "own space". With having small children, I think that may be the best solution with getting them both to the same floor. Everything is real baby steps.
    Before you try the tying up the dogs inside in view of each other, I really encourage you to have done plenty of homework with walking them into the house, walking them out like I described in a prior post. The pyr is super reactive inside so you can't just bring them both in and tie them up. That would be a monumental mistake I think. Being tied up brings out a lot of frustration in dogs. While in our mind it seems like the dogs should realize that the other one is tied up and therefore each one has its own space. But often the dog interprets this as "i am tied up, I can't escape, and therefore I must fight." So you end up starting the exercise with two dogs on red alert for combat.

  3. #33
    Road Dawg

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    21

    Default

    Thanks! Those are all great ideas. I appreciate it! I will keep you posted on how things are going.

  4. #34
    Road Dawg

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    21

    Default

    Hello everyone,
    He went to the vet today, and is fine. His ear was bothering him and it looked like it had never been cleaned. The product I got caused it to become red, but she said he had no mites, just really dirty ears...
    But for aggression, no medical problems. He was a big baby there my husband said and trying to hide behind him. I had him take him rather than me because I probably would of felt fearful to take him, and since dogs pick up on emotions, didn't want that! My husband just took him in, and walked in him. My husband is very confident person, who does not have fear at all, so probably because the dog has bonded so well to him.

    She looked him over and gave drops for the ear reddness from the other product and some cleaning solution. I don't think his ears had ever been cleaned. He had been shaking his head since we got him, but the vet said, no mites or infection, just angry ears from the solution I used. I did call the company to warn them, that in sensitive dogs, it could be a problem.

  5. #35
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) nick's spirit's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Walla Walla Washington
    Posts
    4,491

    Default

    sore ears can make for a very cranky boy!!!

    believe me, I know....our Rudy sits outside most of the evenings in the summer, his ears get filthy and if I'm not diligent, cheat grass & other nasty clinging things can make their way into (deep into!!!) his ears....this year we have been lucky...and also quick to mow down all weeds...

    I hope that having the discomfort in his ears will help with his disposition....let us know!

  6. #36
    Road Dawg

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    21

    Default

    Hi everyone!
    Wanted to give an update. So I obtained all the recommended books plus others and have been spending all my extra time reading them. Learning the dog body language was most helpful. Wow! So with my pyr guy his signal was showing the whites of his eyes. Also sometimes a head turn and a shake ever so slightly. So anytime we saw these signals weíve been slowly stroking him and telling him itís okay. So weíve been working on this for awhile. Bits of time together. Last Saturday was the last instance of aggression weíve seen. I still donít trust him at all. He still gives signs a lot and we quickly diffuse it. They are only together under close supervision. Today though, was something I didnít think would ever happen. We had pyr boy tied outside and our other dog was off leash. Pyr will not stay in the yard untied (Iíve never seen a dog pick up scents and try to dig into the ground when he stops!). Anyway, both dogs started playing with each other. At first we thought it was fighting they then both started play bowing and actually playing. So I hope thatís a good sign!! I will keep you all updated. Thanks for all the book suggestions.
    Since learning the language my parents dog who is a biter and doesnít really like petting, now I see her sign is the tongue lick. Every single time. She freezes up too with it and stares you right in the face. My parents had no idea this was a sign. Sheís never bit my dad but bites my mom. They never corrected the biting as a puppy. (Sheís a poodle now 12 years old). I refused to care for her years ago because she was always biting my children. Sadly I didnít know the signs back then!

  7. #37
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Jewel's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    4,815
      Jewel`s Photos

    Default

    That is a very positive update!! Thanks for sharing!!!

    It is not everyday that someone is willing to put in the kind of commitment you and your family has invested for a dog who clearly has pretty significant issues. You really are to be commended.

    Hopefully today becomes a turning point for the positive. This came about because of the work all of you have put in to convey to this troubled pyr boy that there is nothing to be scared of. Very wonderful progress!!

  8. #38
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) SebastiansMom's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    2,362

    Default

    Thank you so much for the update! You have no idea how happy this makes me!

    I agree 100% with everything Jewel said. Your Pyr boy is incredibly lucky to have found you!

    You have done an incredible amount of work in a very short period of time! That is something to be proud of!

    Sending big hugs and good energy to you!
    Sebastian is on Facebook!
    www.facebook.com/SirSaintSebastian

  9. #39
    Puppy (New Member)

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Potomac Falls, VA
    Posts
    1

    Default

    I am a brand new dog mom to an adopted 5-year-old Great Pyrenees named Muggs. He is healthy, but very fearful of just about everything, and I can't get him to eat. The previous dog parents told me that he ate 2-cups, twice a day, but I haven't be able to get him to eat anything substantive on a regular basis. He seems to eat when he feels like it after much coaxing, and at no set schedule. I am worried that he is not getting enough food for an 80-pound big boy. I have only had him for about 5 days and each day he seems to get a little more comfortable in our home, but it has definitely been a challenge so far. He is a giant, gentle cotton ball, but very finicky and stubborn. Can anyone provide some advice?

  10. #40
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) nick's spirit's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Walla Walla Washington
    Posts
    4,491

    Default

    Welcome...and thank you for giving this boy a second chance...

    I assume you are feeding the same food as he was previously getting...did the other owners tell you if they added anything to his diet...was he free fed....do you have other dogs/pets in the house...children he might not be used to...sights, sounds scents?

    5 days is not a long time, as you know....

    may I suggest....if you put his food down...don't look at him...you can either leave the room, or turn your back to him...but staring at him might just possibly make him uneasy...in dog "language" it's a "dare"...so no stare!

    you can also try feeding him from your hands...again....no direct eye contact...and make it a high quality food....chicken perhaps

    when you are home....sit on the floor....if he comes up to you, great! no forcing...just be on his level, let him come to you & get comfortable with you & your scent

    let us know how he adjusts!

    Nancy & Rudy

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •