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Thread: Opinions wanted

  1. #1
    Young Dawg (Member) Meatball Murphy's Avatar

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    Hi Everyone,
    I'm looking for some opinions or advise for a friend of mine on whether or not to get a Pyr.
    Ok so a friend of mine is in search of a new farm dog and really wants a GP however, wanted my advise, but I'm too new to give any so thought I would throw it at you guys.
    He has a 100 plus acre farm with a small flock of sheep, tons of chickens, cows blah blah blah. He is a smaller scale produce farmer with a farm store on site.
    He has quite a bit of traffic on the farm, store is busy, workers, and he hosts a few community events, he has lots of children coming and going around there. The dog would not be contained to any area and would be free range. Lol.
    Right now he has a lab that loafs around, he loses chickens and the occasional lamb, but works well with the people coming and going.
    My thoughts were a GP would probably not be a good fit due to high traffic and not worth the risk of a GP ending up in rescue if it didn't work. Any experience or anything I could pass on mostly regarding traffic of people?
    Keep your soul clean
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    Your boots dirty.

  2. #2
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Jewel's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by Meatball Murphy View Post
    The dog would not be contained to any area and would be free range. Lol.
    That is generally a really bad idea for a pyr.

    However I am not saying that no pyr could possibly adapt to such an environment as you describe but it would take a dog with a particular personality. This is a guardian breed that has been bred over centuries to guard independently of humans. Historical they roam with the livestock all over mountain ranges and thus allowing them free roam would pose a considerable risk of losing the dog. Many many pyrs, and we have many here in Texas, are lost because they are not securely confined.

    Also, as you already thought of, a LGD typically does not do well with chaos. Constant stream of strangers coming and going may be very stressful for certain LGDs.

    Thus what your friend is asking for is something a bit further than what a pyr's traditional job is. It's not impossible but the problem is how to find that right dog.

  3. #3
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) nick's spirit's Avatar

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    what Jewel said!

    and you can tell your friend....know what they call a Pyr off leash?....a Dis-A-Pyr

    some people get an LGD as a pup & think it's going to know what to do instinctively.....um...that's like putting a baby in the bathroom & telling it to take a shower...I think you understand what I mean! Again, it's why some Pyr's end up in rescue

  4. #4
    Young Dawg (Member) Meatball Murphy's Avatar

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    Sorry what I meant to say was not completely free as the property is fenced. Just free throughout the farm.
    I thought the same things, not a good idea. Was seeing if perhaps someone had a different experience.
    I told him to stick with the labs, losing a couple chickens and lambs isn't the worst case scenario. Lol
    Thanks
    Keep your soul clean
    And
    Your boots dirty.

  5. #5
    Young Dawg (Member)

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    We have a 3 1/2 female that was given up by farmer and went through 3 suburban homes before she came to us. We have 6 acres fenced off and are a half mile from our nearest farmer neighbour. Pyrs are nocturnal and want to get out and guard, in our case chickens, ducks and geese plus cats. They bark a lot, hence you do not want nearby neighbours. We got Ellie when she was 2 years old and she is now finally mature and less impulsive and somewhat obedient. Our 18 month old male Achilles fits his name. He is a very loving dog, great with everyone he meets, but like a teenager, he can be a handful, likes to jump up on people. He is a talker and barker, wants what he wants, and is obedience challenged. Another year and a half until he matures. His puppy picture is just like Meatball, but now he is one big powerful dog. So long as you have acreage, don't mind the barking and can wait three years for your Pyr to mature, get one. They are wonderful dogs.

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