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  1. #1
    Puppy (New Member)

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    Default Biting and snapping at people walking by

    Hello
    Can someone please help me and give me some pointers on how to correct this behavior. My male Great Pyrenees/ Newfie cross will be 3 in June. We recently moved to a remote place in the mountains and there is a bible camp nearby with a trailhead that goes to the border of our property. Whenever someone walks by Greggors runs down to bark at them. We got a complaint that he bit a girl the other day as she was walking by and that the kids are afraid to walk the trail now because our dog barks and snaps at them.
    He used to be fenced up in our old place since we lived closer to town. But now we have been letting him run free since we are so far up in the mountains of MT. Do I need to put up another fence? Is there a training method I should use to stop this behavior?
    We have had him since he was a pup and he has always been vocal at strangers, but never bit any of our friends or family that came over.
    Please help.
    thank you

  2. #2
    Road Dawg Falkor's mama's Avatar

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    Well remember that pyrs are natural guardians and are very protective of their people and property. I would not let any dog have free roam especially a pyr because they will wander away and become a disa...pyr. Good luck.

  3. #3
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) nick's spirit's Avatar

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    Welcome Greggorthegriz & family...

    hmmmm...recent move....more to guard...must be on high guard mode...
    remember....a Pyr will usually only use as much force as necessary to warn people off of their property..not sure about a mix tho.

    yes, I think you are looking at a fence, at least some where near that trail head.....however....Bible camp!!!

    I would think they would be a great assistance in help putting up a fence, as a matter of fact, they should be amenable to talking about a solution to this issue.....and I would also put up a sign to let people know that a Livestock Guarding Dog is on Duty....(not anything that says "beware" "danger"... or anything negative)

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  4. #4
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Jewel's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greggorsthegriz View Post
    Is there a training method I should use to stop this behavior?
    We have had him since he was a pup and he has always been vocal at strangers, but never bit any of our friends or family that came over.
    He's had a track record of being wary of strangers but now you've allowed him to expand his territory as far as he wishes, so he's acting just like he did before, except now there is no fence to keep him back. These children he's threatening aren't your friends or family. To him they're trespassers.

    It's almost impossible to train a dog not to do the thing you don't want him to do if you aren't there to correct it.

  5. #5
    Puppy (New Member)

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    Thank you. You are absolutely right!

  6. #6
    Puppy (New Member) Wolfgang's Avatar

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    Greggors, I'm curious to how you've worked out the issue? Have you decided to put up a fence?

  7. #7
    Puppy (New Member)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfgang View Post
    Greggors, I'm curious to how you've worked out the issue? Have you decided to put up a fence?
    We now keep him contained all the time, with a leash and my husband brings him to work everyday and keeps him in his truck leashed up. It is too cold to build a fence, but once the ground thaws out we will put one up. He is doing really good now. We talked with our vet and a few trainers and found that he had decided somewhere along the way that he was alpha. So we are doing all the right methods to show him that my husband and I are in charge of the pack. He is a quick learner and very smart! He so loves to be on a leash, which works out well😊

  8. #8
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) SebastiansMom's Avatar

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    I will ask for forgiveness in advance, for I may come off as a bit snide. That is not my goal, here. I am here to educate, not to judge. The truth is that there is a lot of misinformation about dog behavior out there, much of it still being perpetuated by the very people who *should* know better - namely, trainers and vets.

    Yes, Dominance Aggression does happen, but it is rare. Dominance is not what caused your dog to bite the Bible campers, and dominance is not going to “fix” the behavior. I put the word “fix” in quotation marks, because when I hear professionals say that behavior can be “fixed” or “corrected”, it is my equivalent to nails on a chalkboard. Both imply that there is a quick and easy way to improve the behavior in a way that is healthy for the dog. There is not.

    Just as when we try to make changes in our own behavior (for example, right now I am trying to develop better housekeeping habits), helping a dog change his or her behavior is not done in one fell swoop. It takes time. It takes patience. It takes dedication and practice. If someone got in my face and yelled at me every time I “forgot” to make my bed, sure, it might make me remember to make the darn bed, but I will guarantee you that there would be some behavioral consequences for me down the road. At some point, I might get in the yeller’s face and yell right back - or worse, I might push them out of my space, or even punch them in the nose.

    Dominance theory, the idea that virtually all dog behavioral problems are caused by the dog’s quest for dominance, has been debunked many many many times over the last 20 years or so. Still, many trainers and vets cling to it as if they were passengers on the Titanic. Why? Because it’s easy. It produces quick, almost miraculous short-term results. Then, when the long-term consequences start to manifest, they can blame the dog by saying that he is too dominant/there is something wrong with him, and tell you either to rehome him or put him down.

    I’m going to link to an article by the late Dr. Sophia Yin, that I would like you to read about true Dominance Aggression. In the article, there is a link to another article about Dominance Theory, that I think it would be helpful for you to read. Dr. Yin was a well-known, highly respected Veterinary Behaviorist. Her book, How to Behave So Your Dog Behaves, is a good, informative introduction to training and behavior modification methods that are based in current behavioral Science.

    https://drsophiayin.com/blog/entry/h...ssion_in_dogs/

    Again, I am not being judgy, here, but I do have a few questions:
    1) Is your boy strictly an outside dog, or is he allowed inside the house as well? If he is allowed inside, how much time would you say he spends outdoors?
    2) When he is outside, does he have another dog or any livestock to keep him company?
    3) When you say that he is leashed outside, do you mean that he only goes outside when you can Leash him and take him out, or do you mean that he is on leash and tethered?
    4) When you say that your husband takes him to work and leaves him leashed in the truck, do you mean the inside of the truck, or the bed of a pickup truck? Is this truck parked in a quiet, out-of-the-way area, or in an environment where he might get quite a bit of stimulation?

    I ask these questions because I am concerned that your boy might be at risk for developing additional behavioral issues - ones that might beyond the capabilities of the vets and dog trainers in your area. Each of my dogs have had issues that have stumped the professionals, and it’s no fun trying to navigate those issues alone. Again, I’m not trying to be snide, I’m just sharing my experience.
    Sebastian is on Facebook!
    www.facebook.com/SirSaintSebastian

  9. #9
    Puppy (New Member)

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    Hello! I saw a post from you a few minutes ago, about your Pyr jumping out of your car... MINE DID THAT WHILE I WAS DRIVING as well... SCARED me to death. She was traumatized, as was I. She was only 8-1/2 weeks at the time. NEVER have I had a breed do that. LOL... Welcome to Great Pyr Mommydom, I am told.
    I am so glad yours was okay too!

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