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Thread: A new addition?

  1. #1
    Puppy (New Member)

    Prospective Great Pyrenees Owner

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    Default A new addition?

    Greetings all. Just wanted to get some advice from other out there as we have given a deposit on a GP. We have one ****apoo(****er and poodle mix...guess it sees the real word as inappropriate LOL) and two cats and we are thinking about adding the GP. We have about half an acre for the dogs to run around and a pool for them to swim in..well, it's our pool but we will share LOL. Any advice on what to do once he comes home? We are going to crate it during the day and have a pet nanny take it out twice while we are at work during the day. We are also thinking about crating it for a while at night until it is potty trained. I am sure I will be waking up several times during the night. We know we have to socialize it with the other animals as well as other people. I read that they can be a challenge to train and a challenge to go on walks with. Any other advice would be great. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) nick's spirit's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

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    Welcome moorashj...and thank you for trying to learn all you can about this breed before you bring him home.....so much to learn...many of us have had multiple Pyrenees over the years & are still learning things ourselves.

    Yes...crate...you will be glad for so many reasons! We usually put the crate in our bedroom at first so that we can take the pup out when it whimpers....and be prepared for a loud response about not wanting to be in the crate. It took our Aussie almost a full week of crying at the top of her lungs before she settled down.

    be mindful of where you take your pup before it gets all of it's shots, you can't guarantee that all other dogs have been up to date on vaccinations...

    I will let the Texas members fill you in on the best way to handle the Texas heat with a Pyr.

    Your current dog....male or female? Opposite genders seem to work best....but not every dog is the same...

    READ...all you can get your hands on about LGD's....they are not anything like your current dog....as a puppy you will find a very cuddly & responsive companion...then maturity kicks in....and they all end up with a Pyrsonality....some get very serious about guarding, some remain very calm & mellow....either way, you must learn how to read the signals & teach your pup how to be the best mannered guy he can be...with patience, humor, consistency, patience, calmness, patience, understanding...and more patience!

    I suggest reading "Livestock Protection Dogs: Selection, Care, and Training" by Orysia Dawydiak & David Sims...as an introduction

  3. #3
    Puppy (New Member)

    Prospective Great Pyrenees Owner

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    Jan 2018
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    Default

    Thanks for your response. I am sure we will learn quickly that this breed has quite the personality. I am preparing myself for the barking at night and the unwillingness to remain in the crate at night LOL. Our other dog is a female. Thanks for the heads up regarding the book. We have roughly two weeks to get ready. This one appears quite mellow at the moment but I can only hope this will last once he grows up.
    What do you think about walking them...easy or difficult?
    Thanks
    Jason

  4. #4
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) SebastiansMom's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

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    Welcome to the forum! Congratulations on your potential new family member!!!

    Coincidentally, this post popped up on my FB feed yesterday, and I am not sure that truer words have ever been posted:

    https://m.facebook.com/story.php?sto...id=28214716181

    Before bringing your puppy home, I would strongly encourage you to insist on the following:

    - meeting the dam and the sire, if he is available, and ensuring that they both have temperaments suitable for breeding. Both should also be at least two years of age.

    - making sure that both sire and dam have had proper medical evaluation prior to breeding. The minimum here would be eyes, hips, and elbows.

    - insisting that the breeder allows you to see where the puppies have been raised.

    - insisting that should you find yourself unwilling or unable to care for this dog at any point in his life, for whatever reason, the breeder will take him or her back, or offer assistance in rehoming.

    I’m sure there are things I’m forgetting here.

    I say this not to be a snob, but because I want you and your family to have the best chance of bringing home a Pyr puppy well-suited to your lifestyle. Ideally, the breeder will be able to help you choose the puppy that s/he feels is the best match.

    In preparation for bringing puppy home, I recommend reading the book “How to Behave So Your Dog Behaves”, by Dr. Sophia Yin. It’s a great book with a lot of science-backed information, but I will say that there are parts that may not exactly apply to Pyrs and other non-biddable breeds. For example, Dr. Yin makesit clear in the book that she would have frowned upon my practice of keeping treat jars around the house in an effort to encourage Sebastian’s cooperation. I say that 20 minutes with Sebastian might have changed her stance on shameless canine bribery in certain circumstances.

    I would also encourage you to bring home a puppy that is the opposite gender of your C-Poo (this is me making a runaround of the bad work filter, which is sadly necessary due to spam bots). Same-gender Aggression is pretty common in Pyrs, and nobody wants you to go through that heartbreak. Of course, I say that as someone who has two male dogs. However, they kind of chose one another, and have a clear idea of where they fit into the family. It was pure luck on my part that allowed my two to be the exception to the gender rule.

    These guys can be a whole lot of work during puppyhood and adolescence, but I feel that they’re worth the effort. During our first two years together, Sebastian frustrated me to the point of tears too many times to count. Now, I can honestly say that I wouldn’t trade any of that for the world. I have learned an indescribable amount about him, dogs in general, and myself over the last 5.5 years. I went into it having no idea what I was getting myself into, and now, I have no idea how to live without him. I will always want an LGD in my life.
    Sebastian is on Facebook!
    www.facebook.com/SirSaintSebastian

  5. #5
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) SebastiansMom's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

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    I can’t speak for everyone about the Universal Pyr Walking Experience, but when thinking about it, walks with Sebastian were usually not exactly a walk in the park (sorry about the bad pun). I recently heard someone say that Pyrs don’t obey, they cooperate. I have been using the term “cooperate” to describe Sebastian for quite some time, now.

    Of course, not all Pyrs are Sebastian, and by all accounts, he seems to fall on the more difficult end of the spectrum. Individual results can, and do, vary.

    Also of note, Pyrs are notoriously bad off-Leash. Off-Leash Pyrs are commonly known throughout the Pyr community as dis-a-pyrs. Again, some are worse than others. I can’t open my front door unless Sebastian is either in the back yard or leashed. He will bolt.

    Full disclosure, I currently don’t walk Sebastian. Both he and my other dog have some dog aggression issues that we need to work on. There are some complicating factors that have made that challenging. When we were walking, however, here are some of the more common issues we encountered:

    Needing to take turns - way back when Sebastian was a tiny baby puppy, an idiot trainer told me never to let Sebastian walk in front of me. Following that trainer’s advice was a big mistake. Sebastian needs a modicum of control over his life. Things got much better once we started taking turns walking in front. He also enjoyed being allowed to decide within reason which way we were going to go. If he really wanted to go left, and there was no compelling reason not to, we went left. I know a lot of trainers who would gasp and clutch their pearls at that. Those trainers have never lived with a Sebastian.

    Taking Breaks - Sebastian loved taking breaks. He would plop right down on the ground and refuse to budge until he was darn good and ready. Sometimes, it was because he didn’t want to go on a walk, sometimes, he didn’t want to go home, sometimes he was just being a butt.

    Overstimulation - especially as a puppy and adolescent, Sebastian would sometimes find himself getting overstimulated on walks. This would often manifest as a game we call Kill Mommy. Not all Pyrs play Kill Mommy, but the ones that do tend to view any type of physical technique to “correct” this behavior as an invitation to play even harder. As Sebastian matured, Kill Mommy gave way to Special Hugs - still no fun for anyone but him, but a boat load better than KM.

    Treats - I eventually learned to bring treats with me every time I left the house. It helped a whole lot.

    Again, this was just my experience, and not all of them are as difficult as Sebastian. If it helps any, we did have a period of time where he was well-behaved enough on walks to make them enjoyable.
    Sebastian is on Facebook!
    www.facebook.com/SirSaintSebastian

  6. #6
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) nick's spirit's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

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    Jason, as with any puppy getting them used to a collar & leash takes time...

    I usually start with the collar & let them get used to that (I use a Martingale collar...they can't back out of it)
    then I attach the lead...let them pull that around for a minute or so..supervised...and you can treat when you are putting it on...keep doing that for a week or so, depending upon your pups willingness to have the lead on...then work on holding it & then directing him...all little steps, done for very short periods, often during a day...

    remember not to stress the pups bones...short walks are best

    as Sebastian's Mom said about her guy...my guy also has dog reactive issues...however, I live in a rural area where there are not many dog encounters, so Rudy & I walk everyday...I use a slip lead...again, it's something he can't back out of...it is 15 feet long, and very strong...made by Soft Lines
    Click image for larger version. 

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