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Thread: Trust

  1. #1
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) nick's spirit's Avatar

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    Default Trust

    for all those new to the forum & to the breed...this is a good read

    actually, this applies to most breeds....

    I am going to share this again from a friend. Too many people think its ok, because they 'trust' their dog.... PLEASE READ!

    There is a deadly disease stalking your dog, a hideous, stealthy thing just waiting its chance to steal your beloved friend. It is not a new disease, or one for which there are inoculations. The disease is called "Trust."

    You knew before you ever took your puppy home that it could not be trusted. The breeder who provided you with this precious animal warned you, drummed it into your head. Puppies steal off counters, destroy anything expensive, chase cats, take forever to house train, and must never be allowed off lead!!

    When the big day finally arrived, heeding the sage advice of the breeder, you escorted your puppy to his new home, properly collared and tagged, the lead held tightly in your hand.

    At home the house was "puppy-proofed." Everything of value was stored in the spare bedroom, garbage stowed on top of the refrigerator, cats separated, and a gate placed across the living room to keep at least one part of the house puddle free. All windows and doors had been properly secured, and signs placed in all strategic points reminding all to "Close the door!"

    Soon it becomes second nature to make sure the door closes nine-tenths of a second after it was opened and that it is really latched. "Don't let the dog out" is your second most verbalized expression. (The first is "No!")

    You worry and fuss constantly, terrified that your darling will get out and disaster will surely follow. Your friends comment about who you love most, your family or the dog. You know that to relax your vigil for a moment might lose him to you forever.

    And so the weeks and months pass, with your puppy becoming more civilized every day, and the seeds of trust are planted. It seems that each new day brings less destruction, less breakage. Almost before you know it, your gangly, slurpy puppy has turned into an elegant, dignified friend.

    Now that he is a more reliable, sedate companion, you take him more places. No longer does he chew the steering wheel when left in the car. And darned if that cake wasn't still on the counter this morning. And, oh yes, wasn't that the cat he was sleeping with so cozily on your pillow last night?

    At this point you are beginning to become infected, the disease is spreading its roots deep into your mind.

    And then one of your friends suggest obedience classes, and, after a time you even let him run loose from the car into the house when you get home. Why not, he always runs straight to the door, dancing a frenzy of joy and waits to be let in. And, remember he comes every time he is called. You know he is the exception that disproves the rule. (And sometimes late at night, you even let him slip out the front door to go potty and then right back in.)

    Years pass - it is hard to remember why you ever worried so much when he was a puppy. He would never think of running out the door left open while you bring in the packages from the car. It would be beneath his dignity to jump out the window of the car while you run into the convenience store. And when you take him for those wonderful long walks at dawn, it only takes one whistle to send him racing back to you in a burst of speed when the walk comes too close to the highway. (He still gets in the garbage, but nobody is perfect!)

    This is the time the disease has waited for so patiently. Sometimes it only has to wait a year or two, but often it takes much longer. He spies the neighbor dog across the street, and suddenly forgets everything he ever knew about not slipping out doors, jumping out windows or coming when called due to traffic. Perhaps it was only a paper fluttering in the breeze, or even just the sheer joy of running.....

    Stopped in an instant.

    Stilled forever- Your heart is broken at the sight of his still beautiful body.

    The disease is trust. The final outcome, hit by a car.

    Every morning my dog bounced around off lead exploring. Every morning for seven years he came back when he was called. He was perfectly obedient, perfectly trustworthy. He died fourteen hours after being hit by a car.

    Please do not risk your friend and your heart. Save the trust for things that do not matter.

    Please read this every year on your puppy's birthday, lest we forget.

    by Sharon Mathers

  2. #2
    Old Dawg (Senior Member)

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    it's easy to slip into that complacent state of mind... until you get a rude awakening. After I brought my Wiley home, I did it all... the routine shots & checkups... the socialization... the obedience training... the CGC training... the tricks classes... top-quality food... you name it. Wiley has been well-behaved... for the most part. But it only takes a momentary lapse for things to go wrong. My lapse occurred almost a year ago... about 3 months after he got neutered. Wiley & I were out for a walk. He had stopped, & was laying in the grass next to the sidewalk. A woman, whom I'd never seen before, came walking up the sidewalk. As she got closer, Wiley got up & approached her. She tensed up when he got next to her. I was untangling myself from the leash, so I didn't see exactly what happened, but the next thing I knew, this lady was shrieking at the top of her lungs that my dog had just bitten her... that she was bleeding, & had to go to urgent care. I saw a small red mark on her arm maybe 1/8" diameter, but no blood. She was still shrieking, which got Wiley growling & barking at her. I asked her if she had dogs (thought maybe he smelled something on her)... she said no... that she didn't like big dogs & was afraid of them... to which I wondered WHY in the hell would she then walk less than 2 feet away from one? Like any responsible owner, I gave her my information. And of course, she filed a bite report on Wiley... so he got quarantined for 2 weeks... which was absolute hell on all of us. I don't even know for sure that he even nipped at her (if he wanted to bite her, he WOULD HAVE), but what's done was done. I can see where, if she tensed up as he neared, that he could interpret that as a threat. Most people who approach Wiley WANT to meet him, and are drawn in by his beauty & sweetness. As a result, I now monitor Wiley's interactions MUCH more closely. I don't want EITHER of us to go through that again. I was a nervous wreck the first time I took him out in public again. But he's still great... bulletproof with kids... and maybe 98% of adults. We go to the mall 2-3 times a week. He wants to go into all the stores & say hi to the staff (he LOVES the Apple store). He gets pets... and treats... he loves it. But whenever a stranger approaches... I monitor his body language VERY closely... a make sure I have firm control of the leash. As they say... maintain a constant state of vigilance! I was lucky... it could have been much worse. What happened was my fault... because I was lulled into that sense of complacency. I don't blame the lady... I realize that not everyone loves dogs... tho I WOULD like to tell her that if she is not comfortable around dogs in public, to TELL PEOPLE. I would never have let Wiley approach her had I known. A lesson learned.

  3. #3
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) snow0160's Avatar

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    Iím so sorry to hear about your pup. A few years ago this happened on the road where an Aussie puppy got hit by a car in front of me. The puppy did not make it but the driver didnít even stop. The owner said the puppy was left in the back yard and dug its way to freedom. I never let my dogs out without supervision. Ever since then Iíve become overprotective and scared. During the New Yearís Eve I was pretty cautious about walking Kit. She does not like fireworks as no dogs ever would. It only takes one incident to break your heart forever.

  4. #4
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Jewel's Avatar

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    @slick - I am sorry about that unfortunate incident with the lady. I know how it feels to be on the other end of the leash in that situation. Hopefully that was a one off thing that was partly contributed by that lady and that it will never happen again.

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    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Zech's Mom's Avatar

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    What a brutally great reminder, I needed to hear.
    I trust my boy a ton already, but this is a reminder trust is a 2 way street.
    He needs to trust me to keep him secured and safe even from the unexpected. I am now never unleashed unless in a secure yard or dog park. I do not want to even imagine what it would be like to lose him, especially from my own foolishness!

  6. #6
    Old Dawg (Senior Member)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jewel View Post
    @slick - I am sorry about that unfortunate incident with the lady. I know how it feels to be on the other end of the leash in that situation. Hopefully that was a one off thing that was partly contributed by that lady and that it will never happen again.
    the funny part is that Wiley REMEMBERS her! About 6 months later, I had Wiley in the truck. As we got to the intersection at the bottom of the street, this same lady walked across the intersection. As soon as Wiley saw her, he went NUTS... growling & barking at her. Then, about 4 days later, I again had Wiley in the truck & was backing out of the driveway... this same lady came walking down the sidewalk on the opposite side of the street... same thing... as soon as he saw her, he started growling & barking at her.

    I'm better at reading his body language & actions these days. The other night, we were at the mall in one of Wiley's favorite stores (Saje- Wellness)... he loves the staff (and they love him). There was a customer... an older woman who had a mask on (trying to stave off the flu bug going around). Wiley didn't quite know what to make of the mask. She was trying to get him to play. He was play bowing, but cautiously trying to sniff her. Whenever she would reach out, he would recoil. The customer didn't understand, & kept trying to get Wiley to play. I got Wiley out of there ASAP. I knew he was interested, but scared, so thought it best to avoid this situation altogether. It sucks that I have to be such a "helicopter puppy parent", but it's better than the alternative. That's like the security guards at the mall... Wiley's totally cool with them, UNLESS they ride up on a bike or a golf cart! There are just certain things that set him off!

  7. #7
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Jewel's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by slick61 View Post
    I knew he was interested, but scared, so thought it best to avoid this situation altogether. It sucks that I have to be such a "helicopter puppy parent", but it's better than the alternative.
    Ok, first of all, I believe there is definitely something off with that lady. Wiley picks up emotions that we do not.

    As owners of these big white fluffies, we have the responsibility of protecting them from this sometimes strange world of humans. You are doing what is necessary to protect Wiley. People are stupid sometimes and you can't argue with stupid.

    The other day we were at a restaurant and I had just put a plate down on the ground of my leftovers for Ren to finish. As he was eating, this family with 4 children came piling out from inside and headed right at us. They crowded around the dog and asked to pet him - never mind that the dog had his head down eating. I told them it was ok but picked up the plate just to be safe. I was surprised that they thought nothing about crowding around a big dog that was eating. Ren doesn't have food aggression but he was a bit disappointed I took away the food. It kinda comes down to parents of human children just sometimes don't give a crap about whether they are interrupting other people, or other people's dog for that matter, just because THEIR children want to pet the dog. But alas, you can't argue with stupid.

  8. #8
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) CaseysMom's Avatar

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    I had tears in my eyes reading that story; it reminded me of the two times Casey got away from me when we were living north of Killeen on the farm and he took off running after who knows what - a leaf, a rabbit? We were very close to the highway and my heart was beating out of my chest as I drove down the highway praying that I wouldn't see him on the side of the road. Luckily, he was safe both times, but I never forget the term "dis-a-pyr," and he is NEVER off the leash when he goes anywhere but the backyard; neither is my Mini Dachshund. Thanks for the reminder.

  9. #9
    Puppy (New Member) Wolfgang's Avatar

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    So true. My first pyr was a rescue, about 1 yr old. On the trip home, he actually made it out the back window of the car as I was
    making a left in heavy traffic. The window was partially cracked, but he managed to pull it all the way down with his massive strength.
    He spilled out into the intersection. Thankfully, all traffic saw this about to happen and stopped. We were able to get him back into car.
    After that experience, he ended up with a halter and attachment that hooked up to seat belt. No more of those accidents.

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