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  1. #11
    Young Dawg (Member)

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    Charlie absolutely loves small dogs. I'm pretty sure he thinks he's a chihuahua. My in laws have 3 dachshunds, 1 shiz tsu and 1 blood hound (a variety, I know lol) and Charlie loooooves the smallest dachshund that they have, she's literally 5 pounds. He likes to put his paw over her and chase her around. He doesn't want anything to do with the blood hound, even though Boone the blood hound is still a puppy himself and wants to be all over Charlie and all in his face which is what I don't think Charlie cares much for Charlie doesn't show him aggression, just walks passed him and onto the little dogs. Charlie's entire demeanor changes around little dogs and all he wants to do is wrestle with them. Charlie has never showed any aggression towards anything. He doesn't pay any attention to cats, chickens, birds, etc. Charlie has loved every person he has ever come in contact with. The only incident I've ever had with him is when my moms boyfriend, whom Charlie had never met before, came through our back door, which is rarely used and Charlie freaked out when he saw him and lowered down in a submissive position and literally started crying then ran into his crate. Nothing like that has ever happened again.

  2. #12
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Jewel's Avatar

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    Ok, just so you know... but this doesn't happen to every pyr, but it's not uncommon...

    Many pyr pups are friendly and social as young pups. But with some, as they approach 2 yrs old, they develop into their mature personality that is very much unlike their puppy personality. My 2 female purebred pyrs did not have a shift in personality when they matured. But my 1/2 pyr did. He was pretty normal as a pup, friendly and sweet like. But once he hit a year old and by the time he was 2 yrs old, he developed into his adult personality that he was no longer fond of humans he didn't know or dogs he didn't know. It took me years to work with him on those issues. My current pup is 11 months now. He's been good so far and I've put in a TON of work socializing him everywhere with everyone, humans and dogs. There is a reasonable chance he'll stay sweet since he's from the same breeder as my last female who exhibited excellent judgment.

    Thus, if you have the chance, try your best to socialize Charlie as much as you are able to. At least to me, it is very important that an 100+ lb dog be able to exercise good judgment and react appropriately in very situation.

  3. #13
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) SebastiansMom's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jewel View Post
    Ok, just so you know... but this doesn't happen to every pyr, but it's not uncommon...

    Many pyr pups are friendly and social as young pups. But with some, as they approach 2 yrs old, they develop into their mature personality that is very much unlike their puppy personality. My 2 female purebred pyrs did not have a shift in personality when they matured. But my 1/2 pyr did. He was pretty normal as a pup, friendly and sweet like. But once he hit a year old and by the time he was 2 yrs old, he developed into his adult personality that he was no longer fond of humans he didn't know or dogs he didn't know. It took me years to work with him on those issues. My current pup is 11 months now. He's been good so far and I've put in a TON of work socializing him everywhere with everyone, humans and dogs. There is a reasonable chance he'll stay sweet since he's from the same breeder as my last female who exhibited excellent judgment.

    Thus, if you have the chance, try your best to socialize Charlie as much as you are able to. At least to me, it is very important that an 100+ lb dog be able to exercise good judgment and react appropriately in very situation.
    Sebastian came into his adult personality at almost exactly the age of 2 1/2. With the exception of the time that his rescue had him hospitalized and then quarantined with the Parvo virus (a period of about 3-4 weeks), he had been extensively socialized with both humans and other dogs of all shapes and sizes. During his hospitalization and quarantine, he still had contact with his human caregivers, but not other dogs.

    From the moment I got him home, I tried to make up for that lost socialization time. We did training classes, play dates, day care, and certain dog parks, and it really looked like he was going to be okay until the first time that it wasn't. Then the second. Then the third. You get the picture.

    Thankfully, he's still okay with humans, and I am able to manage the dog aggression until we find a treatment plan that works for him. Sebastian's behavior is rooted in frustration, which makes it more difficult to treat. I hope to bring the CAAB who helped us with Chester's SA back sometime this Fall to see if we can't get started.

    Believe me, you don't want an aggression problem that is rooted in frustration, and just because he is sweet and cuddly now, doesn't mean that he will stay that way - especially if you continue to use aversive training techniques with him. I won't lie when I say that it's very disheartening to go over your old posts to find that we have already given you warnings about popping and spanking him, and how that kind of "training" leads to the dog becoming aggressive later on down the road, only for you to turn around and slap a shock collar on him for acting like a normal Pyr puppy.

    Please, if you're going to raise this puppy, take the time to do it right. Invest the time and energy in Charlie that he needs. Commit yourself to learning training training techniques that are scientifically shown to have long-term efficacy without being harmful to the dog (the rewards-based methods that we keep talking about). Seriously, pick up How to Behave so Your Dog Behaves by Dr. Sophia Yin, and make a promise to both Charlie and Cali that you're going to do better.

    As for working full-time, well, I work full-time, too. I was working full-time when I raised Sebastian by myself in an apartment. I was working full-time and still single when Chester came to live with Sebastian and me and I started the now three-year behavioral rehab process with him. We were still in an apartment. I'm still single and still work full-time, the only difference now, is that I have a house with a small, fenced in yard. I still have to put in the work.
    Sebastian is on Facebook!
    www.facebook.com/SirSaintSebastian

  4. #14
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) CaseysMom's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by SebastiansMom View Post
    Believe me, you don't want an aggression problem that is rooted in frustration, and just because he is sweet and cuddly now, doesn't mean that he will stay that way - especially if you continue to use aversive training techniques with him. I won't lie when I say that it's very disheartening to go over your old posts to find that we have already given you warnings about popping and spanking him, and how that kind of "training" leads to the dog becoming aggressive later on down the road, only for you to turn around and slap a shock collar on him for acting like a normal Pyr puppy.
    Please, if you're going to raise this puppy, take the time to do it right. Invest the time and energy in Charlie that he needs. Commit yourself to learning training training techniques that are scientifically shown to have long-term efficacy without being harmful to the dog (the rewards-based methods that we keep talking about). Seriously, pick up How to Behave so Your Dog Behaves by Dr. Sophia Yin, and make a promise to both Charlie and Cali that you're going to do better.
    As for working full-time, well, I work full-time, too. I was working full-time when I raised Sebastian by myself in an apartment. I was working full-time and still single when Chester came to live with Sebastian and me and I started the now three-year behavioral rehab process with him. We were still in an apartment. I'm still single and still work full-time, the only difference now, is that I have a house with a small, fenced in yard. I still have to put in the work.
    Casey grew up with Jake, my 10-lb Mini Dachshund, and they are inseparable to this day. I learned very quickly (through this forum) that physical methods of punishment (and the "dominance/alpha dog" training style) do NOT work with Great Pyrenees. They are equally stubborn and sensitive, and once you've lost their trust it's very challenging to rebuild. I agree with SebastiansMom, throw the shock collar in the garbage and read the book she recommended by Dr. Yin and another one by Patricia McConnell called "The Other End of the Leash." Charlie will thank you for it.

    I am also single and work full-time, and I raised Casey and Jake in a very small trailer for a year with no fenced yard (am now leasing a house with a small yard). Daycare and multiple walks per day worked for me. It can be done, but a puppy who is crated for as many hours a day as you crate Charlie is going to need a LOT of exercise WITH YOU, not tied to a tether.

  5. #15
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) snow0160's Avatar

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    My dog benefited a lot from having an older dog around the same age. Lucky is my doodle that is 8 months older. They keep each other busy by wrestling all the time and wears each other out. Kit is 8 months right now and becoming more energetic and demanding. She gets bored even easier now so she has upped her game. She enjoys stealing i.e. Shoes, toys, pillows or even your seat at the sofa. She will also body slam me or paw at me if she gets bored which is quiet often. She is not crated and is pretty much an indoor dog. Our doodle helped teach her to love toys so she stays busy when I have jolly balls and squeakys out. This keeps her occupied for hours. My previous LGD had zero interest in toys other than guarding it from others. It matters how they are socialized as puppies. We also signed her up for CGC class which helps her get her energy out.

    Around 5 months Kit was a chewer and was crated up to 2 hrs at a time. We never left the house longer than 2 hours and we work from home. She ate part of our entertainment system and a few charging cables. It freaked me out because she ate off a huge chunk of the wooden corner. We made sure she didn't have wood stuck in her GI. This happened when she was alone for only a few min while I was in the bathroom. She stopped this as she got older. I want to say by 7 months she was 100% trustworthy around the house, which I didn't think would happen only a few months ago. Her only issue now is she gets bored and enjoys jumping into your lap for a tummy rub session. She is kinda an attention hog and so very dramatic. She was constipated a few days ago and a poop nugget got stuck on her pantaloon fur. She started screaming like there was bloody murder. The same thing
    happens if I accidentally step on her toes.

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