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  1. #1
    Young Dawg (Member)

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    Smile 1st Time Pry Owner

    I am adopting my first pry found in a local animal shelter. Thankfully he appears to have been well socialized and raised to be a people pry as he walks well on leash, sits to be rubbed, etc. as opposed to a herd guardian that bonded with livestock rather than people. While I've always had large dogs, they've been goldens, shepherds, and mutts; breeds that want to please their person. For this adventure I'm reading all I can to prepare for this transition to pyr-dom. I have an older golden that will hopefully help train the (estimated) 8-12 month old pup that his job is to watch over me while I'm working in the yard or at the barn with horses. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Jewel's Avatar

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    Is your property securely fenced to keep your pyr in? It can take a while for a pyr to bond with its new family. If your property is securely fenced, I would take the time to get to know your pyr. Learn what interests / motivates him. Teach him the rules and boundaries in a consistent, calm and confident manner. Reward him well for good behavior. Redirect rather than punish undesirable behavior. In order to bond with a pyr, you need to earn its respect. Sounds kinda crazy but it really is how it works.

  3. #3
    Young Dawg (Member)

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    We have an area with a four foot fence where I will be with him to play while he gets to know my older golden and a smaller fenced area with five and six foot chain link fence that we are covering just in case he's a climber. Otherwise he'll be on leash around the yard and barn or inside with me. I have a crate and will see if he's been trained to enter. We also have a tiled sunroom we use as a dog room when we go out. Some of the rescues I've had have been so abused, if I said 'no' too sharply they would shake and break my heart. This will be a challenge but I've found that building trust is the fun part and once they adopt me as their person, we go slow and enjoy the training. I look forward to learning from others through this forum. A pyr rescue group is having a picnic in April and I hope to meet others leaving nearby.

  4. #4
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Rena450's Avatar

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    I've had 3 Goldens prior to adopting my Pyr, Lyric. She was 9 months old when I got her and she was raised on a farm but well socialized with people. I've had her for 9 months now (she is 1 1/2 yrs old) and it took about 6 months for us to bond - and it is a bond different from the ones I had with my Goldens - hard to explain. Lyric has my heart that's for sure.

    Jewel is correct - I agree with everything she said when it comes to getting to know your Pyr. Setting the rules and boundaries part is important.

    My greatest challenge was getting Lyric to let me know she had to go outside to go potty, that took a while, but, no problem now. Also, if she was outside in the fenced backyard, she would never come to me or even look at me if I called her from the doorwall. She is now starting to do that most of the time - she doesn't run to me immediately like my Golden did - but, on her own time ... when she gets around to it, she gets a treat and I make a huge deal out of it. Otherwise, I get the leash and put it on her -( she never runs away from me) - and I bring her in that way - she never refuses or pulls away. Now, if she doesn't see me checking on her in the backyard, she come up on the deck and look for me in the house.

    She loves people, good with other dogs, sits to be petted, lets me take things from her mouth that she shouldn't have and hasn't destroyed anything, except for one of my slippers a few months back.

    This is a great forum - everyone here has a wealth of knowledge and good advice/suggestions. I'm glad I found it ......

  5. #5
    Young Dawg (Member)

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    Thank you for your reply and encouragement.

    I was supposed to pick up Mr Darcy from the animal shelter last Tuesday after getting neutered on Monday but he had a resp issue so he'll be on meds for two weeks then try again. I visited him Monday and he was going much better so we walked outside for a couple of hours. He does well on a leash at "heel" and loose on an extending leash. When he got to the end of the leash I would stop and wait for him to look at me and could call him back with loads of praise. I have no such expectations when I get him home, just hopes that with time and help from golden Jesse, he will know this is home and his job is to look after me.
    I've had five stray dogs in the last year (including a belgian malinois; folks still drop animals in the country and renters leave them behind) that I've had spayed or neutered and found homes. All were extremely skittish at first but adopted me as their person so I have hope knowing it will take more time due to breed characteristics.
    This forum and two pyr facebook pages have provided a lot of information and solutions to member issues so I'm acting like a sponge to absorb all I can from the experiences of others. Having horses I've learned the slower the training, the better the outcome and there is always more to learn. There's nothing like a 1,000+ pound prey animal, including fearful rescues, to teach humble respect and patience.

  6. #6
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Christi's Avatar

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    Now as I said its not every Pyr that developes that temperament. My dog is from working stock and they are bred to be more guarded. So it may never be a concern, one thing I have found that works with Apollo when say out of town family visits, I tell them to have his favorite treat with them. His happens to be salmon jerky. My Mom came for a visit and came in with a bag of that and everytime he got near her she was giving him little pieces of it. It took about 24 hours for him to stop barking at her everytime she stood up. I kept him leashed for several hours when she first got here, Now my boy is extreme. I have a secondary issue with my other dog being a neurotic mess and full of anxiety which feeds his over protectiveness. It is just something to watch for as you are not aware of history and to be very diligent with good social settings and meeting new people.

  7. #7
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Rena450's Avatar

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    Christi:

    I've been keeping up with this thread and I am wondering if there is anything that I should watch out for (and take serious) in regards to temperament as Lyrics matures since she is only 1 1/2 yrs old and has been spayed.

    I got Lyric from a breeder who owns a working farm and has been breeding Pyrs as working stock and family companions for quite a while. I did some research and heard from (and met) people who had got their Pyrs from her. ... all had been very happy with their choices. I talked to the breeder at great length about my concerns and, based on my family situation with my 26 year old daughter (who is mentally challenged), she said that Lyric would be a perfect fit/match for us. And, so far she really has been .... and, of course, I hope it stays that way. .... but, you never know.

    Do you, or anyone else for that matter, have any advice and/or suggestions that I could look out for as she matures? Anything that you may have missed or,now, when you look back on, realized that it could be a problem later on?

  8. #8
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Jewel's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by Christi View Post
    Now as I said its not every Pyr that developes that temperament.
    Like Christie said, not all mature into that type of personality. There are plenty that do just fine. My two girls maintained the same personality into their maturity. I have a 6 month old male pup right now. He's very good with people and dogs alike so far. I will just continue to socialize him as I've been doing and hope that he'll develop like his aunt, my beloved Bijou whom I lost in 2015.

    So just relax and don't overthink things. You don't want to inadvertently include a negative thought while you are building a bond. Just focus on teaching your pyr partner everything about your world so that he learns what is normal and what to expect. You being in control of your emotions and being confident in handling things will help him to learn how to exercise good judgment.

  9. #9
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) SebastiansMom's Avatar

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    Sassy, Mr. Darcy is one handsome bear! Congratulations on your new family member!

    I am looking forward to hearing more about him as you get to know him!
    Sebastian is on Facebook!
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  10. #10
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) SebastiansMom's Avatar

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    I adopted Sebastian from a rescue, so he was neutered when he was three months old. He was such a handful that I'm not sure I could have waited until his second birthday if I'd had that option. Granted, he is a mix of Saint Bernard, Great Pyrenees, and Anatolian Shepherd, so he was much more boisterous than a typical Pyr.

    Since you are doing your homework and reading as much as you can before bringing him home, I'd like to recommend reading The Other End of the Leash by Patricia McConnell. It was recommended to me by a dear friend on the forum, and it was life-changing. For the Love of a Dog, also by Patricia McConnell, is also a great read.
    Sebastian is on Facebook!
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