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  1. #1
    Puppy (New Member)

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    Default Different hair coats

    New member here,first question..I raise St. Croix Hair Sheep in East Texas (www.mudpuddleranchsheep.com). I use predominantly Great Pyrs to guard my sheep. I also have some mixed with Akbash and Anatolian..For me and my predator and pasture situation the GP's generally work better....The only thing that about them that gives me problems is the thick hair coats that nearly kill them here during our terribly hot and humid summers..Some of my GP's have soft silky hair type that does not matt but most matt terribly..I am considering getting another pup and it seems I have no way to determine what the hair coat will be like once the pup loses his puppy hair..I now need another pup and for that reason I am considering getting an Anatolian which brings a different set of problems..Is there any way for me to select a G.P. pup that will not have the problem hair coat...BTW I have a pair of sibling brothers, one of which matts and one of which doesn't..I do not remember there being any difference in their hair coats when they were pups..Thanks

  2. #2
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Antonia's Avatar

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    Welcome to the forum. I'm afraid I can't answer your question as my Pyrs have all been mixes with a much more manageable coat. If you'd like to share, I'd be curious about what difference you see between GP and Anatolians working? I have Kangals dogs and have had an Anatolian x Pyr and two other Pyr mixes. I've always found the similarities to be more pronounced that the differences in the breeds but would love to hear other experiences. Despite their double coat, my Kangal dog undoubtedly fare better with the AZ heat than my Pyrs have. Have had St. Croix sheep in the past. Loved them!

  3. #3
    Puppy (New Member)

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    We have heavy coyote pressure and I believe the sometimes constant nighttime barking of the GP is a big deterrence..My Anatolian barks but not near as much..I also believe the GP is easier to keep in than the Anatolian..They are not as physically capable of escape from my pasture and they show no interest in getting out.. The heat here can be deadly for them though..I lost my oldest last summer and I think the heat was a factor..Having voiced my preference for the way my GP's work for me I will absolutely agree with you though that there are more differences in dogs than breeds..

  4. #4
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Antonia's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lawman View Post
    We have heavy coyote pressure and I believe the sometimes constant nighttime barking of the GP is a big deterrence..My Anatolian barks but not near as much..I also believe the GP is easier to keep in than the Anatolian..They are not as physically capable of escape from my pasture and they show no interest in getting out.. The heat here can be deadly for them though..I lost my oldest last summer and I think the heat was a factor..Having voiced my preference for the way my GP's work for me I will absolutely agree with you though that there are more differences in dogs than breeds..
    Thank you for sharing. That makes perfect sense. No doubt that my GPs bark way more than my Kangals. Would also have to agree about ease of containment being slightly better for the GPs than Kangals too. My Kangals have tended to be quite athletic and escape artists. Have you looked into a GP cross that might have a more manageable coat but still retain the vocal tendency? My Pyr x Anatolian boy was very big on barking, as is my current mix Lily. Not sure what she is mixed with but she bustles about half the night warning the surrounding area that she is present and prepared.

  5. #5
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Tsunibear's Avatar

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    Unfortunately there is no way to guarantee what coat type you get. Trust me I wish there was, because I would love to have a thick coated Pyr with the nice feathering and such. I mean if you are picky enough your breeder you can greaten your chance of getting the coat you want. A proper Pyr coat will be more coarse then soft so if you pick your pup from a breeder whose sire and dam have the proper coat you will greaten your chance. Though if one of their grandparents had an incorrect coat you still roll the gambit of getting that softer coated Pyr. Ideally seeing father, mother and grandparents would be best, but that's not super easy to find a breeder with all of them.

  6. #6
    Puppy (New Member)

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    "A proper Pyr coat will be more coarse then soft" This confuses me..My Pyrs with soft coats have not matted nearly as badly as the ones with coarse coats..Is my experience different than most?

  7. #7
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Tsunibear's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lawman View Post
    "A proper Pyr coat will be more coarse then soft" This confuses me..My Pyrs with soft coats have not matted nearly as badly as the ones with coarse coats..Is my experience different than most?
    In all of my experience as a dog groomer for over 12 years now the softer the coat the more mats. If you want a softer coat might I suggest that you spay/neuter your dog young then. In the grooming and show world it's called a spayed bitch coat and it's called that because, it's softer then a dog who was allowed a heat cycle. The softer hair tends to be more cotton like causing it tangle more. A Pyr should have a coarser top coat and a softer undercoat. That coarse coat is what gives them that self cleaning effect too.

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