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  1. #1
    Young Dawg (Member) a601mom's Avatar

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    Default Brat behavior when he needs to go out

    Ike is my nine month old Pyr that I got as a rescue at 6 month. In may ways he does so well he amazes me but we do have a few challenges. He is an indoors dog and one of the issues I am having is that when he needs to go out he gets very aggressive and mouthy. I have tried to teach him to use a "potty ball" attached to the door knob and sometimes that works but lately he is more likely to begin mouthing me and if I don't instantly get up and take him out he will bark. I don't want to reward him for this so I put him in a down position on the floor and may give him a short time out in his crate but although it stops his behavior at the time, it does not keep him from doing the same thing the next time.

  2. #2
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Christi's Avatar

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    Hi and welcome to the forums, mouthing is typical, and you can do a few things to work with that. One thing I would like to express is that he is letting you know he needs to go out, and is being put in time out, for a young dog this could be confusing. I understand your frustration, but by not taking him out when he is letting you know he needs to, you could be compounding the issue What we do, is the leash is never attached unless Apollo is sitting. At almost 3 he doesn't even have to be told. If my dog is barking to go out, in my mind that means he REALLY has to go.

    What I would do is put him in a sit at the door and as soon as his butt hits the floor, get him leashed and out. When he sits, praise him before he mouths, so that he understands that the good behaviour is sit. THen work on mouthing with the sweet kisses command.

    http://www.greatpyr.com/forum/showth...to-stop-biting

    This has worked for a lot of us, I used cream cheese instead of peanut butter. Mouthing is very typical behaviour in Pyrs, and they do far better with positive methods than when negative. I think doing these 2 things could really help the situation.

  3. #3
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) CaseysMom's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by Christi View Post
    If my dog is barking to go out, in my mind that means he REALLY has to go.

    What I would do is put him in a sit at the door and as soon as his butt hits the floor, get him leashed and out. When he sits, praise him before he mouths, so that he understands that the good behaviour is sit.... they do far better with positive methods than when negative.
    Welcome to the forum. When I adopted Casey, he was eight months old and had lived in an outside pen all his life. One thing for which I was grateful is that from the beginning, he would bark to be let out. I agree with Christi that having the dog sit by the door is the way to go, and although Casey was never mouthy, he has his issues.

    And I was much more grateful for the "I need to go out NOW" signal when, in my absence, he ate a quarter pound of macadamia nuts (which are toxic to dogs) and had diarrhea for two days. Without being too graphic, it appeared as though he swallowed them without chewing, and this most likely prevented a trip to the vet (although the first thing I did was call her). Casey alerted me no less than 8 times the first night and left piles of whole macadamia nuts wherever we went. Just another day's adventure in Pyrland.

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    Young Dawg (Member) a601mom's Avatar

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    Thank you- I had not thought through the fallacy of the time out but you are absolutely right. Learning to think like a Pyr takes a little getting use to but as I watch him figuring out how to do things(both the things I want him to do as well as the things I don't) I am getting better. I have started telling him "no, stop it "when he gets mouthy but having him "wait" by the door until I get my jacket and his leash. That is working well.
    I was a little leery when I first decided to not only get a Pyr but to get a young rescue dog but have really fallen in love with this dog. He is so good in the house and I love his goofy side. He is a joy. I think the AA serenity prayer really works with Pyrs-"serenity to accept the things I cannot change; courage to change the things I can(might change that to fortitude or patience) and wisdom to know the difference."

  5. #5
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) CaseysMom's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by a601mom View Post
    Learning to think like a Pyr takes a little getting use to but as I watch him figuring out how to do things(both the things I want him to do as well as the things I don't) I am getting better....I think the AA serenity prayer really works with Pyrs-"serenity to accept the things I cannot change; courage to change the things I can(might change that to fortitude or patience) and wisdom to know the difference."
    Learning to think like a Pyr is a process, and several people on this forum recommended a book by Patricia McConnell called "The Other End of the Leash" which has helped me tremendously. There have been days in which I said the serenity prayer every five seconds, especially when Casey was between two and three years old and in his "adolescent jerk" phase. That last line "and wisdom to know the difference" is the tough one, right?

  6. #6
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) CaseysMom's Avatar

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    P.S. Ike is a very handsome boy!

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    Young Dawg (Member) a601mom's Avatar

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    Thank you. So is Casey, what an elegant looking dog.
    This past two days we babysat a friend's shepherd-cross dog, Kodiak, who is a normal adolescent pup, however, by the end of the day, I was so grateful for my calm, low key Pyr. I guess I will forgive him for a lot of his adolescent behavior( forgive but not let him get away with it.)

  8. #8
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) CaseysMom's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by a601mom View Post
    This past two days we babysat a friend's shepherd-cross dog, Kodiak, who is a normal adolescent pup, however, by the end of the day, I was so grateful for my calm, low key Pyr. I guess I will forgive him for a lot of his adolescent behavior( forgive but not let him get away with it.)
    I am crossing my fingers. Casey turned 3 years old on March 1, and he actually seems to be calming down a bit (I'm almost tempted to say this in a whisper; am afraid I will ruin it if I say it too loudly). I live on a farm, and I love to go outside on the porch at night and enjoy the quiet and the fresh air. I couldn't take Casey out there with me for the past year because he couldn't resist running after one of the many cats on the property and nearly pulling my arm out of its socket when he launched. But for the past couple of nights I've been able to take him out with me and he's sat quietly; he's on alert but he's much more manageable now. He has been the biggest learning experience of my life; I used to think I knew how to raise and train dogs, but I hadn't yet been owned by a Pyr. LOL And my mantra over the past eighteen months has been "this too shall pass."

  9. #9
    Young Dawg (Member) a601mom's Avatar

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    I have an overhead cable that I can attach Ike's lead to when we are out on the front porch or in the yard. However, to date, he has never attempted to take off after anything just enjoys sitting on the porch surveying his kingdom. He can go far enough to greet the neighbors or to play with his ball( though he's not a big ball fan) and I don't think I'd trust him outside by himself. I have had a few times when we have started on a walk or to the car, when I have had to run back inside, I tell him to sit and wait and he is really good at that. He is not very prey driven and knows which neighborhood cats he can approach and which ones will earn him a scratched nose.

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    Young Dawg (Member) a601mom's Avatar

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    Default Walks

    I don't have a fenced yard so I rely on frequent walks. I keep him on leash in the neighborhood but we are very fortunate to have some trails where I can let him off leash. He still likes to keep me in view and although he doesn't always come right to me when I whistle, I've found he always comes into view and is usually on a parallel path. I don't let him stay out of site for more than a minute or two and the areas I take him have either a river, deep canyon or fence encircling the area.

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