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  1. #11
    Young Dawg (Member) a601mom's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

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    I have to laugh at these posts. I have a 17 year old granddaughter(don't tell her I posted this) and a 9 month old Pyr and I can't help but see similarities. Both of them know all the rules and both of them make decisions on whether they choose to obey. There is always a delay in coming( gma, give me a minute, I'm busy right now) and both are not above doing what they want if I'm not watching. Luckily with my granddaughter, I don't have to worry about housebreaking but Ike does not drive my car or date boys. She is gradually maturing into a responsible young woman and I am hoping that will happen with Ike before too long. Behaviors like mouthing and pawing are gradually reducing( he responds to "stop it" or "Enough" and being placed in a sit and wait or at the worse timeout), he walks reasonably well, we can walk in the park that allows dogs off leash and unless he is busy playing with a group of dogs, he comes with me if I whistle and continue walking. I would never trust him off leash unless I was supervising( and have had to hike through wet grass and mud to retrieve him on occasion but we are working on those behaviors.

  2. #12
    Young Dawg (Member) Darcie's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jewel View Post
    My puppy started going to daycare at 4 months. I boarded him with a friend who has several dogs a couple of times a week so he got to play with them. Before daycare he was pretty mouthy on both his human parents. But as soon as he started daycare, the mouthing on human flesh decreased drastically. Within 2 weeks, it had decreased by 90%. Mind you, my current pup isn't as high energy as my last two pyrs.
    Jewel, just to be clear do you attribute that change to the fact that daycare started to teach him appropriate uses of his mouth from other dogs or because it drained his energy so throroughly?

    Also, I'm not planning on leaving my girl while she's young and developing but I have wondered about how people with pyrs as companion dogs handle going out of town. I wondered if it's very distressing and painful for a pyr to have his/her human flock out of sight and protection for extended lengths of time? Have any of you seen something common to the breed regarding this or is this something than varies from dog to dog?

  3. #13
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Jewel's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

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    Quote Originally Posted by Darcie View Post
    Jewel, just to be clear do you attribute that change to the fact that daycare started to teach him appropriate uses of his mouth from other dogs or because it drained his energy so throroughly?
    The dogs at the daycare are mostly adult sporting breed dogs that move fast and are ball chasers. The yard they play in is probably 1/3 acre so there is room to run. Thus in Ren's case, it's sheer exhaustion from chasing weimeraners and goldens around all day that drastically reduced his need to use his human parents as playmates. Pups tend to use teeth more with slow moving playmates like us 2-legged humans.

    Quote Originally Posted by Darcie View Post
    I wondered if it's very distressing and painful for a pyr to have his/her human flock out of sight and protection for extended lengths of time? Have any of you seen something common to the breed regarding this or is this something than varies from dog to dog?
    Varies from dog to dog. Also depends on how much socialization you do. One of the benefits of using a daycare starting from puppyhood is that most daycare places also do overnight boarding. Your dog already knows the place and the staff so if you board your dog there when you leave town, the dog is not likely to be as stressed as suddenly being taken to be boarded at an unfamiliar place.

    Since Ren's used to going to daycare, he is used to being left and picked up. I do like the places with webcams in the suites. Once when I boarded my prior pair of pyrs, I watched my Bijou tear a comforter into shreds on the webcam. When we went to pick them up they showed us a picture of the shredded comforter to prove she did destroy it (thus we had to pay for it). She wasn't in distress when she did it. She was enjoying it.

  4. #14
    Puppy (New Member)

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

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    Apr 2017
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    Canada
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    Aleforge, I think you are in the hardest part right now, because they are full on puppy still, with alot of physical strength and will power to resist. I remember noticing at about 2 1/2 years old, WOW , he really is a reliably great dog with occasional bursts of puppiness, but not the mischief puppy parts, the excitableness. The resistance turns to obedience, although usually with about 30-45 seconds of forethought.

    Mine was quick to potty train, however my method was to take him out every hour when we first got him, and took turns having one of us hang out in the back yard Alot of the day ( it was summer and the kids were home). Then first thing in the morning, quite early started to walk him and this became the routine. Now he won't go to the bathroom in the back yard at all, or even on our campsite if we are away, always needs his early morning walk, and then gets an afternoon walk as well. I also think the walks use up some of that 'trouble energy'

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