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  1. #1
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Christi's Avatar

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    About Newfs? Tommy and I have discussed getting another big fluffy when Apollo is about 4, which is about a year and a half away. I love my dog dearly, but I am not so sure that a pyr is the right fit. For one, Apollo is unpredictable, and has some aggression issues, planning for company or repair people is tedious, and the barking!

    So I have thought about Rescuing a young adult Pyr, that I would know is not going to have the same issues, or getting a different breed. One breed that I like is Newfoundlands. I have been around them before, they tend to be friendly giants. I am thinking they are not big barkers. However I have never lived with one before. I did my research with Apollo. I knew about the barking, I read many places they bark, its loud, and usually in the middle of the night. I have said before its one thing to read it and understand its a whole different thing to live with.

    I would also seriously consider rescue with any breed I decide on. That being said, I am not ruling out purchasing a puppy. I have talked with a breeder in my area, and we can work out the puppy being held till after the 3rd parvo booster, because I can't be sure my property is cleared. The cost is high for a newf, but would still be cheaper than Apollo's hospital bill was. At this point that is my barometer.

    Rescue really attracts me because I can give a dog a chance, know its personality and any quirks before I ever bring it home. The concerning part of that is Rescue requires a home check and Apollo will show his butt. I would like to think that in a year he will be more mellow, and will allow strangers into the house without wanting to eat their face, but I doubt it. Now I also know that rescue would understand that I have quirky dogs and that we can come up with a good plan to work this out.

    I guess what I am looking for is to see if any of you can think of something I haven't. I am in no rush and would prefer to give myself lots of time to think this through. Apollo was an impulse, and I made the decision between his birth and 5 weeks. This time I would like to make better decisions.

  2. #2
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) SebastiansMom's Avatar

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    Truth be told, I have never met a Newf that I didn't fall instantly in love with. I am seriously considering a Newf at some point in the future.

    They are hard to find in rescue. Sebastian's rescue has them from time to time, but they are usually adopted quickly. They will adopt out-of-state if you come to Texas for a meet and greet. If traveling to Texas is within the realm of possibility for you and Tommy, let me know, and I will get you in touch with them. One of the volunteers I would get you in touch with has had at least two Newfs that she adopted from the rescue. She is a really nice person, and I know she would be more than happy to talk to you.

    The two main drawbacks that I can think of (other than hair, with which you are already all too familiar)are life span (an average of 8-10 years) and drool. My ex's Saint managed to get drool everywhere and on everything. I often found myself with dried "shoestrings" of it on my clothing, and it was not that uncommon to find dried drool on the walls and even the ceiling. It's something I got used to, but not for everyone. I am glad that Sebastian turned out to be pretty dry-mouthed.
    Sebastian is on Facebook!
    www.facebook.com/SirSaintSebastian

  3. #3
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Christi's Avatar

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    Now we have the South Carolina Newf rescue within about 3 hours or so. Not sure I could handle a trip to Texas with the husband, and both dogs and possibly the cat. Not sure who would be the first one riding on the luggage rack, but I am willing to give odds on the husband

    Now I am not too sure about the drooling, although at least that is not as loud as the barking. I would love to move but its not realistic, so we need a dog that won't bark quite so much. There is just a lot to think about.

  4. #4
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Jewel's Avatar

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    Well, the best time to look for a dog is when you are not in a hurry! I know newfies are better at taking commands than pyrs because it is not so uncommon to see newfies at obedience trials. That is about all I know about them!

  5. #5
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Christi's Avatar

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    That is what I was thinking Jewel. Today in the spirit of fun I did one of those dog breed tests to see what that came up with. To my surprise, Newfoundland, St Bernard, Bernese Mountain dog, Borzoi and Bull mastiff where the breeds selected for me. So just for kicks I looked up info on all of them. Tommy is on the fence about a newf, because of the drooling, he does not care for mastiffs, and had never heard of the Borzoi, but looking at it, he was like well thats not attractive lol. Looking at the info I can see that the Newf or the Berner would be a nice fit.

    But I just keep coming back to Pyr's. I cant help but think that given proper breeding, and sound temperament could make a world of difference in how I feel about Pyr's. Apollo's was an accidental breeding, from working dogs, not registered so for all I know there could be huge issues in that line. I have met other Pyrs that were friendly and didn't want to eat the face off everyone they came around. I wouldn't mind the barking in and of its self, its the combination of all his faults. Now don't think I am sitting here hating my boy, but he has a few flaws that are a lot of work to deal with and at times I do have some regret. BUt he is my flawed dog, and I love him dearly.

    Tommy also really likes Pyr's and I do have to take his opinion into the equation. He likes the idea of adopting a 1 to 2 year old Pyr, that we can make sure has the temperament that we are looking for. He fell in love with the pictures of your puppy Jewel, and has said he wouldn't be opposed to a puppy, but only of we use a good breeder this time. I just keep thinking though, Apollo was a sweet puppy that loved everyone, till he didn't. He was never abused, ignored or otherwise neglected, so it wasn't conditioning that made him be the way he is.

    Good thing there is plenty of time........

  6. #6
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Tsunibear's Avatar

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    I work and play with a lot of Newfs and I love them all, but I won't lie to you every issue you are having with Apollo you can have with a Newf. I wanted to rescue one that I worked on even though he had issues, but his owner decided against it and sent him to a legit rescue who I got to talk to later about and since I was there with the Pyr rescue they told me about him. While I could have handled his issues, because of my dog experience most people cannot so he was rehomed into a single family home and they are who they use to help assist in training issues. They can be amazing dogs just like a Pyr, but you have to remember they can have their issues and when this happens they are bigger then a Pyr so you will have to be able to handle it. This guy was 160 lbs at 3 years old and was very lean still meaning when I got him wet you could see his ribs still. He was all muscle and when he loved a person he loved them with all of his heart, so much so that if someone he didn't feel comfortable with came near that person who would growl and lunge. Now usually it's not common for the breed, but around here they are bred so often that like a Pyr some people shouldn't be breeding them that do and you get some questionable dogs. So if you go that route make sure you do your homework because, you don't need Apollo and future dog butting heads.

    As for the drooling yes they do that by the bucket, but I think that's part of their charm. Bull Mastiff's drool, Saint's drool and so do Berners so if drooling is an issue then those guys aren't going to be winners.

  7. #7
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Christi's Avatar

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    See that is just another thing that points me to rescue. They take time with them, get to know them and can place them with a lot more certainty then buying a bred puppy. And I hear ya about the drooling, me it wouldn't bother, but as much as I would like to think otherwise its going to be a deal breaker with Tommy. What he wants is a Collie, you know like Lassie! He tells me that kind of dog would be perfect, they are smart. loyal, and easy to train. And here I am going yes they are, and they are also high energy, herding, and if not given a job can turn neurotic. So then we are right back to a Pyr, its the one breed we can both actually agree upon.

    I like the big HUGE drooly dogs. They tend to be big teddy bears, most of the time. But if you can't handle the drool, no amount of assurances on my part will talk him into falling in love with one of these. I even suggested a dane, and he doesn't like them either. He tends to think they look aggressive, and that is a big turn off for him.

  8. #8
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Tsunibear's Avatar

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    Missy's trainer breeds Collies. If you get a Collie do not get a rough coated Collie. Get a smooth coated Collie there is a HUGE difference in their personalities. Oddly enough rough coated Collies are prettier, but aren't very bright. I have met her Collies and seen the offspring she breeds. Her Collies aren't hyper at all which was shocking for me, the Standard Poodle in our class was more neurotic then them actually it was crazy. So don't count the Collie out just yet, just say no to the rough coat.

  9. #9
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Christi's Avatar

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    How funny, I had wiki up on the page about Berners, and Tommy read it it, looked at a few pictures and was like I like the looks of these. I said ya know they are a drooly dog, you know what the man says? Well ya can't have everything, I like that kinda dog, I think that is what I want. MEN!!!

  10. #10
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) snow0160's Avatar

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    Hey! I love Newfies! I fostered a landseer once. So here is my take on Newfies. They seem less aloof than LGDs. A few months ago, I bought a new motor for my boat and we passed by the dog park and we saw the biggest cuttest Newfie swimming and prancing around in the lake with a bunch of dogs. It was hard to miss this one. I want to say Newfies are a bit higher energy than Pyrs. This dog was so cute I made my husband dock the boat and I jumped out into the lake to pet the Newfie. I talked to the owners and it was an retired couple who used to own Great Pyrenees. The wife really liked the Newfie and said it was much friendlier than her old dog and can be trusted with the grandkids. The husband said the dog is no where nearly as smart as their 3 previous Great Pyrenees. I have a good feeling it was the wife's idea to get the Newfie. One issue I have is that over the years I've purchased ONLY light colored furniture and clothing to match my white Maremma. Everything is beige or white. The shedding gets pretty gnarly. My mother in law has two black labs and her furniture is all black. When we visit with the dogs the shedding becomes really obvious. I can't imagine having a black dog and a white dog with that much hair and together in the same house at the same time. Despite all of that, I think Newfies are not barkers and are quite intelligent and highly trainable. The downside is the slobber, shedding, and higher energy.

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