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  1. #11
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) nick's spirit's Avatar

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    just today I passed a Pyr that was tied up outside...he was going berserk...pacing, barking, lunging...at any & everything that passed him

    then I saw another Pyr, behind a fence, with his goats, walking around sniffing the ground...nothing disturbed him

    now, I don't know how old these dogs are, nor do I know their gender...but I think you get the picture of which one was the more secure & balanced dog...

    In my humble opinion, it isn't a matter of if a fence should get built, but how quickly (tomorrow) can you get it built....and now it might be worth a very private & secure fence, because at 3 1/2 years old, he is in his top physical condition & can probably jump a 6 foot fence.

    Can you contain him in one section of the house, garage....?
    do you not think he is trustworthy?

    the solution will be one you will have to work on...hands on, with someone to guide you through the process, someone who can read Coopers body language & help you to read it also....most dogs give a warning....we just don't always have the skills to read it

  2. #12
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) SebastiansMom's Avatar

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    I agree with Nancy, here. Doing nothing is not an option if you plan on keeping him. Choosing to continue leaving him tied up and unattended outdoors not only puts other people at risk of serious injury, it puts you at risk of serious financial liability or even criminal charges if he bites someone, and puts him at risk of being seized by animal control and euthanized for being a dangerous dog. There is no magic protocol on the internet that is going to make him safe tomorrow, next week, next month, or whenever you get the fence built. The longer you wait to start treatment with him, the more difficult it is going to be.

    In the meantime, here is an article that may be helpful:
    https://drsophiayin.com/blog/entry/w...evels-in-dogs/

    For what it's worth, Sebastian has never touched his teeth to my skin in anger. Still, he has exhibited behavior that counts as a Level One bite against me on the Dunbar Scale.

    Also, you may want to read up on dog bite laws in your state. Here in Texas, we have a one-bite grace period, in most cases, before we can be held legally liable (the exception being if the first bite causes serious injury or death). Your state may not be so generous.
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  3. #13
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Pjg8r's Avatar

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    I'm sorry you are experiencing this with Cooper. As has been said, the tethering needs to stop immediately. In my opinion, if you are not able to leave him in your house when you are gone, boarding him at your vet's office or with a kennel familiar with the breed and informed of his aggression is needed until the fence is completed.

  4. #14
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Tsunibear's Avatar

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    Why not crate train him or kennel him inside? Tethering him leaves him vulnerable to strangers walking up to and teasing him or making him uncomfortable which is like setting him up for failure. I get not wanting to leave him unattended in the house but, crating or kenneling him doesn't give him full range and keeps him safe. It also gives him a safe space if you have company over and he is feeling overwhelmed. I know Missy goes into her crate at the shop anytime she feels overwhelmed because, she knows that is her safe place and I won't let anyone or anything get to her there.

  5. #15
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Jewel's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by J_Cassady View Post
    I'm at a loss of what to do and why this is suddenly happening.
    The behavior didn't suddenly happen. It has been developing overtime and you just haven't noticed it until Cooper actually became openly aggressive.

    What has happened is that as Cooper matured, the frustration caused by tethering built up more and more until he decided that he would deal with matters on his own terms. Allowing him freedom all over the neighborhood on his own basically taught him that he should make his own decisions on how to deal with his frustration. By allowing this frustration to build to the point of him actually acting out, it is very important that every effort be made that he doesn't get to act out anymore. The more he practices the aggressive behavior, the harder it becomes to modify the behavior.

    Nearly a year ago we adopted a 3 yo male pyr that was tethered in the backyard for at least the 1st year of his life. He was extremely leash aggressive and that was just one of his many emotional problems. A tethered dog tend to develop a reaction first response rather than assess the situation as a well-socialized dog would do. We had to return him to the rescue 3 months later. I put in quite a bit of work with him in the 3 months and I am an experienced pyr owner but it just didn't work out. It was a horrible decision to have to make but there was no other option for us.

  6. #16
    Puppy (New Member)

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    I'm beginning to wonder if part of this behavior could be due to low thyroid. Other research I've done suggests that. Cooper is a very social dog and loves most everyone. He has been doing very well on a leash when walking him this week. I plan to start taking him to "Dogs Day Out" to get more exposure to other dogs and people.

  7. #17
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) nick's spirit's Avatar

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    this is part of an article with Dr. Dodds, a leading authority on thyroid testing in dogs & cats...
    so if you are thinking thyroid, this is a good read & you can get the proper tests done...

    in my opinion, I would get Cooper tested before any more interaction with dogs & people until you get the results of the test back

    please let us know the outcome


    Complete Thyroid Antibody Profiles vs. T4 Tests

    I asked Dr. Dodds how vets could learn to perform truly effective screenings for thyroid dysfunction in pets. She replied that as part of most comprehensive wellness exams for presumably healthy pets, veterinarians order a number of blood tests, including a total thyroxine (T4) test, which is a type of thyroid function test.

    The problem is that the results of a T4 test can be totally misleading, because thyroxine levels can be affected by non-thyroid-related illnesses, a wide variety of drugs, and excessive iodine in the diet. According to Dr. Dodds, about 8 in 10 T4 tests, whether run in-house or at an outside lab, return a low number, indicating the animal is hypothyroid.

    Some vets treat patients based on just the T4 value, when it may or may not be appropriate, such as in the case of autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Dr. Dodds feels that to accurately diagnose thyroid conditions, we should be running a complete thyroid antibody profile. And veterinarians should explain to clients up front that while the test is more expensive than a T4, it will also tell us what we can rule in or out.

    Then we can compare those results with the history we have about the dog, for example, that sheís been gaining weight even though sheís not eating more. Or a normally happy, outgoing dog has grown withdrawn or is showing aggression for the first time ever.

    Behavior changes are actually important markers. Most of my clients feed their dogs exceptionally well, meaning they offer species-appropriate, fresh, non-GMO, organic diets. Itís important for everyone to know that for dogs who are very well-nourished like the majority of my patients, often the only symptom of hypothyroidism is a very subtle change in personality or behavior.

    Thyroid Tests Dr. Dodds Recommends for Dogs

    As part of a complete thyroid antibody profile, Dr. Dodds includes total and free T4, and total and free T3. Many veterinary experts believe itís useless to measure total and free T3, but Dr. Dodds strongly disagrees. The T3 values are necessary because in the case of a sick animal who has low levels in all four measures, itís much more likely to be a non-thyroid-related illness. Total T3 and free T3 are the markers that indicate a non-thyroidal condition.

    Dr. Dodds also includes a thyroid antibody test, which for the initial screening is the thyroglobulin autoantibody test. She doesnít, however, include a TSH test, because it isnít as accurate in dogs as it is in humans. Itís only accurate about 70 percent of the time in dogs, when it should have a minimum accuracy of 90 percent.

    Bottom line, Dr. Dodds recommends against running the T4 only, because it gives an incomplete picture, and also the canine TSH on dogs, because it isnít dependably accurate.

  8. #18
    Puppy (New Member)

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    I believe pyres need something to kill and something to protect. I have four buddies and have never had trouble as the wolves, bears, and coyotes give them plenty to vent on. Freyja also eats stray dogs that attack the livestock. I have Freyja and Odin each 3, Baldr a pup who loves everyone, and Thor a 13 year old dog that trained them all to act right.

  9. #19
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) SebastiansMom's Avatar

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    I agree with Nancy on running the test for Thyroid Antibodies. It is a more expensive test, but will be far more indicative of whether or not he actually has Thyroid disease.

    In dogs, as in humans, the majority of cases of Thyroid disease are autoimmune in nature. In the beginning stages of the disease, when the immune system is actively attaching the Thyroid gland, the levels of T4 present in the blood go up and down. I have autoimmune Thyroiditis, and was symptomatic for years before I was diagnosed. All of my levels were within normal range except for my antibodies. It took several weeks of Thyroid medication to make me feel human again.

    If he does, indeed, have Thyroid disease, I would wait several weeks after starting him on meds before trying to socialize him, and even then, I would tread lightly. Even if Thyroid disease is the root cause of his aggressive behavior, he may still have to learn more constructive ways of coping with stressful situations.

    As for the suggestion that you just give him something to kill, well, Science says otherwise. In a dog with an appropriate temperament, killing is a last line of defense only to be used when all else fails. It is disturbing that anyone would try to convince someone that this is not only appropriate behavior, but also a bragging right. No reputable breeder would knowingly produce puppies with such serious temperament flaws.
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  10. #20
    Puppy (New Member)

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    New update on Cooper's behavior.

    We have been trying to do quite a bit more training with him and taking him on leashed walks. No major incidents this week until yesterday afternoon. It was a nice day so we decided to take him and walk trails for his exercise since it was a nice out. He has never had any problems whatsoever riding in the back of the truck. He loves it. While driving down the road a dog starts chasing our truck & Cooper jumps out (we were going about 40 because it was a back road). He starts to pick a fight with the dog and then shows no interest in him. He has never had any type of aggression towards other dogs, especially when in a vehicle. Luckily nothing was broken, but he is getting more and more out of hand. I'm taking him to our vet this week to discuss his behavior and see what he thinks. His behavior is just breaking my heart because I can't stand the thought of having to get rid of him.

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