Page 3 of 8 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 75

Thread: Weight and Size

  1. #21
    Old Dawg (Senior Member)

    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    83

    Default

    seems that the website's been taken over by cheap advertising

  2. #22

    The Big Dawg (Administrator) risestar's Avatar


    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Arlington, WA, USA
    Posts
    409
      risestar`s Photos

    Default

    They are a constant pest but get cleaned out once we see them

  3. #23
    Old Dawg (Senior Member)

    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    83

    Default

    thank you

  4. #24

    Default

    they now weigh 60 and 65 pounds. They just started to eat a little more now that it is a little cooler I guess.

  5. #25

    Default

    hello all, I just weighed them again today and they are 85 and 90 lbs. They are 9.5 months old. I guess they are on track. I live on a farm and can only have them out when I am out there with them, so they spend some of there day in a 10X10 kennel. This spring I am hoping to fence in a bigger area for them so they can get more exercise. I do walk them alot and play alot with them everyday.

  6. #26
    Old Dawg (Senior Member)

    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    83

    Default

    Sounds good Charmin, glad things are moving along nicely for you

  7. #27

    Flock Guardian (Moderator)


    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    529
      fluffylove`s Photos

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Christine
    Hey

    6 months old is normal time to spay - 2 months old is considered an "early" spay - and besides your "Kitty" is already huge - and spaying will not effect her growth rate at this point, and will very possibly save her from cancer.

    Cancer risks for females increase with every heat cyle anywhere from 10 to 25% - save your baby now
    Spaying messes up the growth plates in the legs, alters head growth and has the pyr grow taller still. SPaying is not good for pyrs until they are older. I have NEVER seen a male or female pyr that has been altered that looks like a pyr. It changes them. A study wasd done on rotties and they had a 4x chance of getting bone cancer if the were altered early in life. There are a lot of myths about altering. I have seen what it does to pyrs and would definetly recommend waiting until they are fuly grown unless there are other factors at play. On the other hand dogs like aus sheps apparently have to altered. So many myths and so little facts.

  8. #28
    Puppy (New Member)

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Wylie, TX
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fluffylove
    Spaying messes up the growth plates in the legs, alters head growth and has the pyr grow taller still. SPaying is not good for pyrs until they are older. I have NEVER seen a male or female pyr that has been altered that looks like a pyr. It changes them. A study wasd done on rotties and they had a 4x chance of getting bone cancer if the were altered early in life. There are a lot of myths about altering. I have seen what it does to pyrs and would definetly recommend waiting until they are fuly grown unless there are other factors at play. On the other hand dogs like aus sheps apparently have to altered. So many myths and so little facts.
    I have yet to see what you are describing.
    I have been in Pyr rescue for 3+ yrs. All of my personal Pyrs have been spayed before 4 months of age and they LOOK like Pyrs.

    Pyrs & Rotties are 2 VERY different breeds.

  9. #29

    Flock Guardian (Moderator)


    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    529
      fluffylove`s Photos

    Default

    I know it's a sensitive subject, but I have seen what it does over at my end and it DOES mess up the growth plates in PYRS and they do NOT develop the head they are supposed to, even our vet/rescue person knows this. I thought it was all nonsense too until I saw it for myself. Pyrs that are taller than they should be, thinner bone structure and more aggression issues than my dominant intact male. I can only speak from my own experience which to this date points this way, plus my breeder has been in it since the 60's and has seen it. She got her dogs from top American breeders in it's day, Quibbletown and Villevieux. I do not object to fixing dogs because there are so many irresponsible owners out there but I do suggest people keep an open mind, that's all. There are many many misconceptions to fixing dogs but there are hardly any studies out there to support either one. Vets make money on it just like vaccines.

    Have you every seen a proper pyr and what they should look like according to the standard? I have been to many shows, read almost all books out there, (except for the $500 one by Mrs M. Crane.) seen what breeders around here have bred. I suggest looking, and keeping an open mind. I have one more question, if neutering is SOOOO good for dogs, why is it that police dogs are NOT neutered, protection or narcotics????? Explain why in studies, there is more human aggression with neutered dogs than with intact ones? I can forward you the study I found and it focusses on other breeds as well.

    I do not mean any disrespect, you are speaking from your knowledge and experience, but so am I, on top of which vets awknowledge they do not develop the way they should.

    Please read over the following website :
    http://saveourdogs.net/health.html It will give you an idea of what some of the falsehoods of altering dogs are!!!!

    On the positive side, neutering male dogs
    eliminates the small risk (probably <1%) of dying from testicular cancer
    reduces the risk of non-cancerous prostate disorders
    reduces the risk of perianal fistulas
    may possibly reduce the risk of diabetes (data inconclusive)
    On the negative side, neutering male dogs
    if done before maturity, increases the risk of osteosarcoma (bone cancer) by a factor of 3.8; this is a common cancer in medium/large and larger breeds with a poor prognosis
    increases the risk of cardiac hemangiosarcoma by a factor of 1.6; this is a common cancer and major cause of death in some breeds
    triples the risk of hypothyroidism
    increases the risk of geriatric cognitive impairment
    triples the risk of obesity, and with it many of the associated health problems
    quadruples the small risk (<0.6%) of prostate cancer
    doubles the small risk (<1%) of urinary tract cancers
    increases the risk of orthopedic disorders
    increases the risk of adverse reactions to vaccinations

    On the positive side, spaying female dogs
    if done before 2.5 years of age, greatly reduces the risk of mammary tumors, the most common tumors in female dogs
    nearly eliminates the risk of pyometra, which otherwise would infect about 23% of intact female dogs; pyometra kills about 1% of intact female dogs
    reduces the risk of perianal fistulas
    removes the very small risk (<0.5%) from uterine, cervical, and ovarian tumors
    On the negative side, spaying female dogs
    if done before maturity, increases the risk of osteosarcoma by a factor of 3.1; this is a common cancer in larger breeds with a poor prognosis
    increases the risk of splenic hemangiosarcoma by a factor of 2.2 and cardiac hemangiosarcoma by a factor of more than 5; this is a common cancer and major cause of death in some breeds
    triples the risk of hypothyroidism
    increases the risk of obesity by a factor of 1.6 - 2, and with it the many associated health problems
    causes urinary spay incontinence in 4-20% of female dogs
    increases the risk of persistent or recurring urinary tract infections by a factor of 3-4
    increases the risk of recessed vulva, vaginal dermatitis, and vaginitis, especially for female dogs spayed before puberty
    doubles the small risk (<1%) of urinary tract tumors
    increases the risk of orthopedic disorders
    increases the risk of adverse reactions to vaccinations

  10. #30
    Puppy (New Member)

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Wylie, TX
    Posts
    3

    Default

    IMHO your vet is telling you this to make more money off of you for spay/neuters.
    http://spinrescue.org/
    In the words of Russian dictator, Joseph Stalin:
    "The killing of one is a tragedy, the killing of millions, a statistic."
    Animal shelters kill and breeders breed.
    It is a vicious cycle that currently sees no end.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •