Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Puppy (New Member)

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    South Padre Island, Texas
    Posts
    3
      Amys01`s Photos

    Default Looking for Great Pyrenees Dog Trainer, South Texas

    I rescued "Buddy" About 3 months ago, I live down by South Padre Island, and I have searched and searched, and gone through 2 dog trainers{neither had any idea on how to work with a Great Pyrenees} to help with Buddy. I am looking to see if anyone has any help on any dog trainers down here that have worked with Great Pyrenees? I have run out of resources...."Buddy" is 2 years old, and we are his 4th home. He's bored and I know looking for job to do, I am not sure type of things I can give him to do to keep him busy. He is extremely socialized with us, and goes to doggy day care a couple times a week to interact with other dogs etc. Any help that anyone could offer I would appriciate it.

  2. #2
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) nick's spirit's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Walla Walla Washington
    Posts
    4,547

    Default

    Welcome Amys01 & Buddy....and thank you for giving this boy a home

    Can you give us some insight as to what you are trying to specifically address with him???

    What is it that he is doing that may need re-direction?

    sounds like a pretty nice guy being socialized & can go to doggie day care!

    Nancy & Rudy

  3. #3
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Jewel's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    4,976
      Jewel`s Photos

    Default

    I am with Nancy, not sure what your goals and objectives are with respect to what the trainer is to do for you & Buddy.
    By bored do you mean he's too full of energy? A trainer would not be able to really help Buddy if he's got too much energy to burn and nowhere to burn it. Without knowing the areas that you are looking for help it's difficult to know what to suggest.

  4. #4
    Puppy (New Member)

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    South Padre Island, Texas
    Posts
    3
      Amys01`s Photos

    Default

    Buddy has never been an indoor dog, he is now. He has always been able to do what he wanted with no direction. I do know that he has a twin sister and the second home kept her but gave him up due to being destructive and barking non stop. He shows signs of anxiety which I probably would too being in 4 homes. He hates cats, about goes through the windows in the house if he sees one, and and any dog that walks by, and well, he puts his nose in places it shouldn't go when he's around people. I walk him 3 times a day, doggy day care twice a week, weekends take him to the beach around people etc. He's eating my coffee table, my bed, anything he can get his mouth on. He's a big dog with big changes. I am trying to find a way to just teach boundaries or get advice on him.

  5. #5
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Christi's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Bristol,Tn
    Posts
    1,625
      Christi`s Photos

    Default

    Ok that is a little better information. First Pyrs bark, a lot. My boy is horrible with the barking. What we do that sort of works, is to go check, look out the window, tell him good boy!! I see it letting him know that you acknowledge the threat, and have it under control. How long of a walk do you take him on? I have a large male and at least 4 days a week, many times more than that we take a long (3 to 4 mile) walk. We take short breaks, I make both dogs sit and look at me, and give them a cup of water off my canteen. Now it being 90 degrees for sao long I have to admit we are not talking the longer walks. Apollo is not interested in being in the heat. SO we do 3 to 4 half hour training sessions a day. I have flirt pole, that early in the morning I can get him to chase around and we play a modified form of fetch. This takes about 5 toys, we use heavy duty rope toys, i throw one for him to go get, walk to him and throw another the opposite direction. He won't bring them back, but he will chase them.

    Not sure how much you know about pyrs, but its in their nature to do what they want without human direction. They have been bred for thousands of years to be like that. Without trying to be mean, that's life with a Pyr. His interest is in making you safe. Not so much interested in making you happy. What you need to strive for is a partnership with your dog. You need to learn to trust and respect each other.

    Chewing, this could be anxiety. My not-a-pyr chews. We buy soup bones at the grocery store, they get a 3 to 5 inch bone, meat scraps and marrow intact. gives me a couple hours break from dealing with anxious behaviour from one, and barking from the other. I am also a big fan of the Yak Milk bones. Pricey but well worth the cost. Antlers as well. I also stuff kongs with cream cheese and freeze them for a nice treat. I must have a dozen rope toys, I have the rope balls as well. I would not yell at or scold the dog for chewing on the wrong thing, instead redirect and give him what he is allowed to chew on.

    As to the crotch sniffing, also a dog thing. When they meet another dog the sniff the nether regions to identify each other. Apollo does this and I gently push his head to one side and tell him nose out of crotch! Is Buddy fixed? I noticed after my boy was fixed he does it less, but he will still from time to time do it. Oddly my female never does.

    Welcome to the forums, we would love to see pictures I hope some of this helps.

    Also nothing in life is free of NILF. That's good to practise. Nobody gets a treat, a bowl of food, a special toy without sitting when they are told. Without fail it works. They have a cookie jar that I keep there treats in all i have to do is remove the lid and both are sitting quietly. So now I make them lay before they get a cookie.

    Training sessions are a great way to get the dog used to listening to you. Now they are not circus poodles, so I wouldn't expect them to do wicked awesome tricks. This is more an exercise in focus and listening to simple commands at my house. You may chose to do things differently but this is how I have structured my dogs day and it works well for me.

  6. #6
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Pjg8r's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Gainesville,Fl
    Posts
    177
      Pjg8r`s Photos

    Default

    Thanks for giving Buddy another chance for a forever home. If he was always outdoors he probably gets very frustrated by animals he can see but not "get to." If he goes to daycare twice a week I assume he gets along with other dogs away from home? If so that's a good sign, but he may never want strangers intruding at home. As Christi said, this breed barks. If there is a way to block his view of animals passing by that might help, but if he hears them or smells them he may be more reactive if he can't see what is going on. Even though he is 2, it might help to think of him more as a puppy. Everything is new to him. When he was outside he could chew anything he wanted. He doesn't understand that your table legs shouldn't be gnawed. The more exercise you can give him the better. I know it's hot right now and that makes it hard to tire them out without overheating. Good luck.

  7. #7
    Road Dawg Falkor's mama's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    South Texas
    Posts
    24
      Falkor's mama`s Photos

    Default

    I am amazed! I live about 30 minutes from South Padre Island in San Benito! I really never see any pyrs down here. How exciting! Anyway, there is a guy that I have heard great things about. His name is Jaime and he works at K9 Consultants. I have not trained with him before, but my vet said great things about him, and so does the natural pet food store that I go to. He trained police dogs and now owns a training and boarding service. You can look at his facebook and see what he does. I hope this helps. Thank you for adopting this boy! Oh also, here are a few things I do to entertain my boy. I like to take a few of his toys and freeze them in some water overnight. Then I give him the block of ice in the morning and let him go at it. I also use a laser pointer. He LOVES it. Chases it like a cat. Also, you can hide a treat in a box and let him try to figure out how to get to the treat. He'll rip up the box and entertain himself for a good while.

  8. #8
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Jewel's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    4,976
      Jewel`s Photos

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Amys01 View Post
    He has always been able to do what he wanted with no direction. He hates cats, about goes through the windows in the house if he sees one, and and any dog that walks by, and well,
    Amys01, I think the first thing I would note is that if Buddy is able to go to daycare, it means he is not reactive. This is a HUGE positive.

    Because he is a social dog, it suggests that his core issue may just be that he has never learned frustration/impulse control. That combined with his age, right at the height of energy level and young adult immaturity, makes him kinda outta control.

    On those days when he spent the day at daycare, is he easier to deal with in the evening? When you walk him, how fast do you walk, how long in distance do you walk, is he allowed to take lead? When you take him to the beach to meet people, is he on leash or off leash? I ask because you describe several walks a day, daycare and beach outings on the weekends it sounds like it's a lot of exercise. But depending on how those activities are structured, he may not be getting enough exercise notwithstanding the frequency.

    When you are dealing with a young dog with an over-abundance of energy, particularly a pyr, you have to be VERY careful about the type of trainer you go to. Pyrs for the most part do not respond well to traditional training methods. I've met a lot of pyr owners over the years and have attended 3 Great Pyrenees National Specialty shows. I've only met one pyr owner who has ever put a pyr through Schutzhund training. I had a long conversation with her and her pyr was not a normal pyr by any means. I myself put my pyr through obedience and agility training and she held titles in both disciplines. But I can tell you I had to learn and adapt a lot of training methods on my own because the usual methods did not work with my pyr. Having been on these boards for some time now, I think I can safely say a lot of other pyr owners would agree that traditional training methods did not work all that well for them either. But these days there are a lot of classes offered that are not traditional obedience training classes. I know here in North Texas there are classes offered for socialization, manners, as well as impulse control.

    Pyrs generally do best in positive reinforcement training. But in order to implement effective positive reinforcement training, you need to know what motivates Buddy. Is he food or toy motivated? It is not unusual for an owner to say that his/her dog isn't food motivated only to find out that the owner is offering pieces of dry, crunchy, bland dog cookies as reward. Thus sometimes one has to try higher value treats (brisket, cheese, liver, hot dog) to find out if the dog is really food motivated or not.

    With my dogs, we used clicker training pretty effectively. Clicker training when done properly encourages the dog to use its brain to get you to click the clicker for a reward. There are a lot of resources on the net about clicker training. But you might want to check out books written by Karen Pryor who was the pioneer of clicker training for dogs.

    As for the notion that Buddy "needs a job", this could be done in a number of different ways. Walking can be a job as well. One way to use the walk as a "job" is to put a backpack on the dog and make the walk a purposeful walk at a good pace. Buddy would not be allowed to sniff and gawk at whatever he wants. At the end of the walk he gets praised and rewarded with whatever works for him. Unfortunately it is way hot these days in Texas to walk a dog.

    Like Christi said, implementing NILIF is a good thing to do. NILIF helps a dog to learn impulse control.

    But for me, ultimately to be successful in helping a dog to become more in control, the key is draining excess energy in the first place. I know that can sound exhausting, but there is just no magic bullet in these things. If you can let us know the structure of his exercises, we may be able to help out with a bit of adjustment to set Buddy up for success.

  9. #9
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) SebastiansMom's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    2,439

    Default

    I am 100% in agreement with Jewel, here.

    Buddy sounds a lot like my Sebastian. Sebastian is highly energetic, highly impulsive, and has a very low tolerance for frustration. In fact, he is so high-energy, impulsive, and easily frustrated that I recently had him tested to ensure that the vet who performed his neuter didn't accidentally leave a testicle in during the procedure. There were no testicles left behind, Sebastian is just a loveable but difficult boy.

    I grew up training and showing dogs in competitive obedience. I can honestly say that nearly nothing that I learned about dogs when I was growing up applied to Sebastian. In the four years that Sebastian has lived with me, we have worked with three obedience instructors, two behavior modification trainers, and one veterinary behaviorist. Of those six professionals, only one obedience trainer has understood Sebastian enough to make a lasting positive impact on his behavior. Two obedience instructors and one behavior modification trainer actually did more to set us back than they helped. The remaining behavior modification trainer and the veterinary behaviorist were able to help Chester, my non-Pyr, but had little effect on Sebastian.

    The type of training that was least effective with Sebastian, and caused more problems than it solved, was the kind that for me, at least, was the most intuitive. Don't want the dog to jump? Push him off of you. Don't want him to bark? Grab his muzzle and tell him "no". It made sense to me at the time. The problem was that Sebastian took these types of corrections as invitations to play his favorite rough games. Instead of discouraging unwanted behaviors, I was strongly reinforcing them.

    Sebastian's favorite rough game of all-time was one that I named Kill Mommy. He would jump up on me and mouth me in a manner that scared the you-know-what out of anyone who was unfortunate enough to see it. We lived in a pretty urban and walkable part of Dallas at the time. This was also a game that was ONLY fun when it was played in public. We had people run over to help me, people pull their cars over in traffic to try to help me, we even had a fine-dining waiter run out of his restaurant while he was taking a table's order to try to help me. It was embarrassing to say the least. He also liked to break into the game during obedience classes, prompting many unintentionally rude comments from other dog parents, such as, "What is wrong with him," and "Wow, I am so glad my dog isn't as bad as yours". The worst comments came from the obedience instructors, though. His puppy Kindergarten teacher told me that he had "an attitude problem", and wanted me to put a prong collar on him when he wasn't quite four months old. Another instructor told me that Kill Mommy was very dangerous behavior that needed to be stopped immediately. She offered no advice on how to stop it (if stopping the behavior had been easy, it would have been stopped by that point), she just added to my stress when he was doing it, which actually made it more fun for him, and reinforced the behavior.

    At some point, I don't remember exactly when, I started taking a counter-intuitive approach. Instead of scolding him for barking, I started thanking him, and offering him a cookie (you can't really bark when your mouth is full of cookies, after all). When he would jump up on me, I would stand still and ignore him. That made the game way less fun, and he would get bored with it. When he would walk ahead of me on a walk, I would let him. I would even let him choose which way we went on walks. As a result, he would get frustrated far less often, and far less intensely. I learned that Kill Mommy wasn't just a result of excess energy, but also a product of his frustration. Kill Mommy was still played, but less frequently. As I just stood there, and refused to react, the game was not as fun, and ended sooner. These are all things that made vets', trainers', and other professionals' heads explode with thoughts of how crazy I was, but it was WORKING for us.

    I finally gathered up the courage to enroll him in a canine good citizen certification class. At that point, I still had dreams of doing competitive obedience with him. That class shattered those ambitions, but it was a GOOD thing. Sebastian had reverted to being as frustrated as ever, and it got to the point that he spent almost an entire class in time out for trying to kill me. I was so frustrated and embarrassed that I had emailed the instructor about quitting the class, and taking him to a veterinary behaviorist instead. I was convinced that he had something severely wrong with him.

    This instructor talked me down off of the proverbial ledge, and encouraged me to complete the class. She assured me that there was nothing "wrong" with him, and that he was just an adolescent male being an adolescent male. She spent a good portion of the next class helping me remain calm when he acted out, and the difference was astounding. He was put in zero time outs for the rest of the course.

    In the time since that class, I have put my energy into helping Sebastian make good choices. There have been some bumps along the way, but overall, things are much improved. As he has reached maturity, he has calmed down considerably. Kill Mommy turned into Sebastian giving me "Special Hugs", and I can only think of maybe two or three times he has given me those in the last four months. He did develop some dog aggression issues, that I believe are rooted in frustration, which prompted us to move from an apartment building in the city to a townhouse (with a fenced-in yard) in the suburbs. His aggressive outbursts now are much easier to handle than they had been. I use the counter-intuitive approach. Instead of yelling at him and telling him he's bad for trying to fight the other dog through the fence, I open the door to the house, ask him to come inside, and praise and dispense treats like crazy when he complies. I keep treat jars strategically placed around the house for quick rewarding.

    I also practice NILIF with both dogs, and have them sit and wait at doorways they would like to go through. I don't necessarily go through them first, I just have them wait until I say "okay". That has helped some with the frustration.

    If you are looking for a basic manners class, I would recommend looking into the classes they have at Petco or Petsmart. Those classes usually use rewards-based methods like clicker training. Rewards-based methods are useful in training LGDs, because they trick the dog into thinking that you both want the same thing. I found that Sebastian responded best when I used a wide variety of high-value treats. He tends to get sick of having the same old thing over and over.

    I know this is a whole lot to take in at once, especially when you have your hands full with a dog who is, well, a handful. Please let me know if you have any questions, or if there is something you need us to clarify.

    Also, please keep us posted as to your progress with Buddy!
    Sebastian is on Facebook!
    www.facebook.com/SirSaintSebastian

  10. #10
    Puppy (New Member)

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    South Padre Island, Texas
    Posts
    3
      Amys01`s Photos

    Default

    Thank you for making me realize I am not a lone in my flight with Buddy. Great advice that I will be taking from you and everyone. We have taken him with us up here to the hill country for vacation, and he has done great. We have hired a dog sitter to keep him when we go out and about to places he can't go, and he's been great for her. We have only had 2 outbursts of kill my mom in the week we have been here. I will definitely be using everyone's advice that have posted. I had to laugh when I read your post, it sounds like our dogs are related, so glad you found a medium point. It gives me hope. Thank you!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •