Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18
  1. #11
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) SebastiansMom's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    2,434

    Default

    I hope it works for you!

    We have a yellow lab in our building named Max that Sebastian absolutely HATES. Every time Max has the "audacity" to be anywhere within sight, Sebastian goes absolutely ballistic. We are going to see a behaviorist about it next week.

    In the meantime, I've been working with him on my own for the last few months, with slow but steady success. I almost always carry a treat pouch with me when I take the boys out. Whenever we see Max, I use the treats to distract him and then reward him for being calm. The whole time, I use my happy voice to tell him how good he is for being calm, and that Max is our friend. The progress has been slow, but any progress is good...

    Another thing that I learned from my ex's reactive Saint, is that dropping to the ground when they start to lunge turns you into an anchor, and makes it easier to keep them from getting away. It's definitely not an ideal solution, but it's better than a trip to the emergency vet...

    Please keep us posted with your progress!
    Sebastian is on Facebook!
    www.facebook.com/SirSaintSebastian

  2. #12
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) 2BIGWHITEDOGS's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Muskoka, Ontario Canada
    Posts
    60
      2BIGWHITEDOGS`s Photos

    Default

    Will do!
    He tends to lunge as cars pass on our road so I am thinking this is where I will start training him in the collar before taking him where we would meet other dogs. I don't care if he ends up hating cars - the less he likes them the better!
    Funny thing, it was really hot the other day and I just walked him in the woods here in his flat collar instead of the easy walk harness. He pulled alot more than usual, shows how effective harness is. Just not effective enough when he does a full blown lunge.

  3. #13
    Young Dawg (Member) Pearl Grey's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    14

    Default

    So what happens if you stop dead when he pulls on the lead? Aoife has her moments when she thinks we're headed to a tractor pull, but we just don't go anywhere until there's a float in the lead line. Once she puts some slack in the line, we move. Until she does, we stay at a halt.

  4. #14
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) 2BIGWHITEDOGS's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Muskoka, Ontario Canada
    Posts
    60
      2BIGWHITEDOGS`s Photos

    Default

    Normally, Brody is not a puller - he is great with a loose leash 99% of the time. Its that 1% of the time where he suddenly lunges - could be a chipmunk, bird, strange dog. If I am not prepared for the lunge (and we walk in dense bush - hard to see things coming) he can take me off balance or get away from me. Because he is strange dog reactive, this is an issue when we hike busier trails.

  5. #15

    Flock Guardian (Moderator) Chicag0_Red's Avatar


    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    1,653
      Chicag0_Red`s Photos

    Default

    As one who deals with a wide variety of Pyrs with divergent issues and degrees of re-activeness I am a big proponent of the prong collar when fitted and used appropriately/correctly.

    When used properly they don't associate the pinch with the other influence whether it is animal, vegetable, or mineral, but rather with the correction you are issuing. Also the pinch collar is less damaging physically than choke chains, flat collars, etc. (ie: less likely to cause injury). Will it totally stop him from lunging ... not without training. Will it give you more control over him when he does. Yes. From your descriptions of his reactions there is a big trust issue that needs to be corrected there (Remember he and his fellow Pyrs were bred for thousands of years to not let strange canines near their charges.) So you have a challenge ahead of you that may require the help of a behaviorist or someone that can read his body language prior to his escalating to the point of lunging.
    _Red

    --Tutores Cavere --

  6. #16
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) 2BIGWHITEDOGS's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Muskoka, Ontario Canada
    Posts
    60
      2BIGWHITEDOGS`s Photos

    Default

    Thanks Red, I was hoping you would weigh in. I am now looking for a trainer - not sure we have a behaviorist anywhere near my neck of the woods - to help us work out the reactivity issues. I can anticipate the "here comes a strange dog lunge" and be ready for it (the time he did get away, I had lost my balance on a rocky hill). The worst lunge is the "lets chase the chipmunk" - sometime is is really sudden and when we are on rough trails, I have probably been watching my feet rather than his head (sometimes I do see him stare at the chipmunk in time and am ready). The rest of the time, he walks beside me like a gentleman.

  7. #17
    Puppy (New Member) emilyarau's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 2BIGWHITEDOGS View Post
    Hoping some of you who have success with prong collars will chime in. My neutered male pyr (3 years) is reactive to strange dogs. So far I have hiked with him in an easy walk harness and leave the trail when I see another dog approaching. A couple of weekends ago we got blind sided by another dog and Brody got away from me when I lost my balance on a hill trying to get him off the trail. He charged the other dog but did not fight (the other dog was a hound, female I think and she just bayed at him but did not engage with him.) By the time I got to him he was heading back to me. My question is...would the prong collar work in this situation. I am afraid that the discomfort from the collar might make him more aggressive?????? But I also know that he can get away from me...or pull me into a situation where I get hurt. I am pretty sure he is mostly leash agressive and will not engage another dog when he is loose. I have read the Patricia McConnell books (several of them lol) and have tried many of her methods but the nature of the trails I hike are that sometimes there is no escape from other dogs (narrow, rocky trails and owners who do not listen ).
    Hey! I have two Pyrs, brother and sister, 130 and 85 pounds respectively, and as a 120 lb pregnant woman, it's hard for me to control one, let alone both, even though they aren't really even pullers! My vet introduced me to the "Gentle Leader". It almost looks like a muzzle (not that scary though, I promise) and attaches to the leash and prevents the dog, without pinching or stabbing, from pulling on the leash. It's safe for you and your dog, and really makes a huge difference.

  8. #18
    Puppy (New Member) emilyarau's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Here is a link, they are inexpensive and although seeking training would be the real "fix" to the problem, in the meantime, a head collar would help keep both of you safe. Here is the link, hope it helps!

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00074...8-4378352?vs=1

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •