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  1. #1
    Puppy (New Member)

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    Default Shock collar for chasing cars

    I hate to ask because I know some people do not like the shock collars, and I don't want to start an argument about how cruel they are. However, if I want my dog to not get killed by a car, I think this may be the best solution. I am wondering if anyone has had success with a certain brand of collar. I know I will have to shave a patch to make contact.
    Here is our situation:

    We recently moved to our own place that is right on the road. It's not a busy road, but my pry has decided that 3-4 particular cars should not be driving down them and repeatedly chases them. She will sit on the porch, she was sitting in the middle of the road, and when she hears certain cars coming, she bolts for the road. No amount of calling or shouting stops her. I have tackled her a few times and she is not deterred by the possibility of that happening again. Usually she hears them WAY before I realize they are coming and runs for them. Some cars she pays no attention to at all.

    Putting up a fence right now is not an option. Chain link would be cost prohibitive. Our property is 7 acres and very long and narrow, all along the road. I thought about the invisible fence, but it seems they have to be set up in a circle to work. Again, right now that is too costly. Until we can get permanent fences and gates up, I am hoping this will solve the problem.
    Thanks for your help.

  2. #2
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Davey Benson's Avatar

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    sorry to sound like a butt. You say "Putting up a fence right now is not an option.." and the very first thought that popped into my head was "but getting a breed of dog that MUST be fenced in was an option?".

    You don't have a black lab, or a golden retriever, or a german shepherd, you have a great Pyrenees. You say "no amount of calling or shouting stops her." Yep, that sounds correct for the breed. You say "she is not deterred by the possibility of (getting tackled)..." yep that's also true, they aren't afraid of being tackled by humans, that's pyr play to them.

    Great Pyrenees dogs just don't adjust well to being disciplined with a heavy hand. (physical means) You can try the shock color, but can you guarantee that you will be around every time she darts out for a car? Right now you see she only selects certain cars, but what if she decides that all cars should no longer drive in front of your house? If it were me, I would either go with a kennel for outside for now, spend more leash time outside with her, keep her inside or try the invisible fence. (and no, the particular shape of the area doesn't matter on the wire triggered type, but they do have to make a continuous loop around the dog to contain them, you can't just run a straight line along the road.... you have to set up an entire boundary, but it can be square, rectangle, irregular shaped, etc. )

    Another option is to use the radio frequency invisible fence. Instead of having to set up a trigger wire along the ground, it just throws out a radio signal to a certain distance from the transmitter, so there is minimal setup involved with it.

    The problem with relying solely on the invisible fence to contain a great Pyrenees, is that they may just blast right through the barrier sock collar or not. So it's still a gamble.

    I recommend looking into your options a little more, but you are right, a great Pyrenees makes a terrible speed bump, and it sets you up for all sorts of liability.
    Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read. Groucho Marx

  3. #3
    Old Dawg (Senior Member)

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    Hi Mimi
    I don't want this article to offend anyone who has previously replied to your post, but I must give a thorough explanation about shock collars.

    First of all, I believe shock collars are NOT abusive to the dog. In fact, they don't even 'hurt' them -- it just surprises them...just like when someone sneaks up on you and unexpectedly pinches you just enough to surprise you but not enough to actually hurt.
    I know there is much controversy over this matter, thus I would like to share my thoughts, opinions, and experiences.

    We used a shock collar very effectively for our Saint Bernard -- and he wasn't scarred for life or anything...as a matter of fact he was the nicest, most gentle dog there ever was. Just like a giant teddy bear

    We also know people who use a shock collar on their black lab. She is another of the nicest, most gentle of all dogs I know.

    But, as you can see, both of these dogs weren't a pyrenees. Yes, the shock collar worked very effectively for them; but do we know it will work for your dog? We simply don't know...every dog differs. I know the shock collar did not work for our pyrenees, just because he is different (aka more stubborn lol) than the other dogs. But sometimes a shock collar can help that stubbornness...as I said before, it all depends on the dog (personality, ect.).

    So if you buy a shock collar, no one can guarantee that it will work effectively. Thus you will be taking a risk...although sometimes risks help in the long run.

    I can relate thoroughly to you because a fence (even an invisible one) is not an option for us right now. On top of that I've heard many stories of a pyrenees either 1) opening the fence 2) just running through the electrical one.

    Oh, and for the people that suggest electric fences over shock collars -- they both do the same thing...they both shock the dog (or surprise).

    Right now we have a cable we run our dog on. He is ALways on a leash It gets frustrating at times, but sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do

    Well, hope this helped...

  4. #4
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) MiyasMomma's Avatar

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    I agree with Davey 100%! If I could strongly suggest you don't use any "force" I personally feel it will really backfire on you. Pyrs are wired differently than other dogs....being shocked at home might mean to the Pyr "run away" this place hurts me. Electric fences are for cattle. My experience and alot of the advice I've received is positive reinforcement is what works with a Pyr, negative NEVER works for me. How do you think it will perceive being electrified?

    These are huge dogs.....a walking liability. You seriously are asking for to be sued if you let it run loose or don't ensure it's contained.

    I have an acre chain linked with 6ft tall fencing. Some can even climb that, but I believe if you have enough room (an acre or more) they will be happy to stay home. I still only leave them out for small amounts of time without watching them, for their protection, no one elses. They're my babies and I treat them like children because they really think like a child in many ways. You wouldn't leave your kids out in the yard playing without frequently checking on them, same with a Pyr in my book.

    Personally I strongly suggest you use GPAndre's correction. Make a long cable run. Good luck.
    Miya's Momma

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  5. #5
    Young Dawg (Member) EricaD's Avatar

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    Just thought I'd throw this out there for folks concerned about a Pyr blasting through an electric fence: There is a new technology out there that causes the collar to go off for 20 straight seconds or until the pooch heads back inside the boundary - whichever is shorter. Additionally, the collar only shocks when the pooch heads OUT of bounds - it stays silent when they head back into bounds. The longer shock period is much more of a deterrent than a single quick zap. And no, I"m not an invisible fence salesman.

  6. #6

    Flock Guardian (Moderator) Terry's Avatar


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    They work! Murphy knew all about it and Emma does not go out of the boundary.

    Just got to show them where it is once and thats all it took here.

  7. #7
    Old Dawg (Senior Member)

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    How much do they cost?

  8. #8
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) MiyasMomma's Avatar

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    I'm confused...I knew a woman that had a collar on her Weimeraner and left for Mexico for a weekend and when she got back the collar had malfunctioned and burned the dog severely. I based my opinion on her experience with the system.

    Are there two different versions of the invisible fence and the shock collar?

    Terry how did Emma react to being "surprised"? I know you would never hurt her so if you used it then I need to not give any more opinions!
    Miya's Momma

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  9. #9
    Young Dawg (Member) EricaD's Avatar

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    GAH!!!!!! I had most of a reply typed, and my computer ATE IT!!!! Or, rather, I hit the back button accidentally and lost it. Here goes the shorter version:

    Miya - I know you weren't talking to me, but I thought I"d share my story anyway (well - the somewhat shorter version, since I killed my other post . I spent over a year researching an invisible fence because it was the only option really available to me since I live in an HOA where fences aren't kosher. I found that those awful incidents are very rare, though they do happen. I have many neighbors who have used IF for years without issue. Because I'm paranoid, my neighbors know when I"ll be leaving hte pooch outside with no one home - usually only for a few hours. I have NEVER had a problem with the fence, and there are times when I don't put the collar on Buddy when I let him out. I don't need to - he respects the boundary (though he is a lab, so a little easier to train).

    Now, I have a 3 month old Pyr puppy who I have been training on the boundary, but have not yet gotten a collar for (and won't for a few months). I have read that they do work for Pyrs as long as you don't start training them during a fear phase. So, I'm still learning with this one.

    GPAndre - the cost depends on how much space you're fencing in and whether or not you have a professional do it for you. We fenced in about an acre - with some woods, and we had a professional do it (since they know what they're doing, and I'd hate to mess something up that caused my pups issues). The cost was around 4K.

  10. #10
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Jewel's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by EricaD View Post
    (though he is a lab, so a little easier to train).
    I've no helpful advise on this topic, but just HAD to say something about the quote.. A "little easier"????!!!!! That's kinda similar to saying it's a "little easier" to teach a fish how to swim than teaching a chicken to swim

    Sorry, couldn't resist...

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