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  1. #1
    Old Dawg (Senior Member)

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    Default Service dogs allowed?

    Odd question here. I'm on a waiting list for a service dog, and it will likely be a Pyr (hence me skulking around these forums). If we were to compete in an obedience competition, would it be cheating to use a dog that's a certified service dog?

    I likely won't ever do this, but mostly I'm just curious. I know next to nothing about competitions and shows, so I'm fascinated.

  2. #2
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Davey Benson's Avatar

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    well.....

    I can see a great Pyrenees being used for a therapy dog, I'm not sure about a "service dog". Depends on their job.

    As far as obedience competition, I don't know that a great Pyrenees would be a "shoo in". They just don't strike me as biddable enough to compete with german shepherds, collies, terriers, and labs.

    Meh... I could be wrong.
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  3. #3
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Jewel's Avatar

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    Nope, it would not be cheating to compete a dog certified as a service dog in obedience competition. Obedience competition requires precision in performing the exercises, which is different from what is a service dog does when its working.

    A pyr is not commonly seen in obedience competition. There are obedience titled pyrs, but it's usually not as easy to train a pyr to do the precision work as compared to training other more biddable breeds. Bijou is in training for obedience competition right now... hehehehe, here's a vidoe of Bijou; this one command took about 9 months to train


    Also, when one competes in either obedience, agility, or rally, one doesn't necessarily have to compete with other dogs that are entered. This is because these competition are for each individual dog to earn qualifying scores and then with the adequate number of qualifying scores, to earn titles. While there will be a first place winner in each class of competition, a dog doesn't have to win a class in order to earn titles. This is why Bro has earned multiple agility titles notwithstanding he is by no means fast compared to other dogs competing in his class.

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    Old Dawg (Senior Member)

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    Davey, apparently pyrs make amazing Autism service dogs. Service dogs for other disorders are needed to take direct commands from the handler. However, Autism service dogs need to be able to think on their own, and make up their own mind as to what to do. It also helps that pyrs naturally make order out of chaos (when they're not causing it themselves), which Autism definitely can be.

    Bijou. Is. Adorable.

    Pyrs? Precision work? Is that even possible? I think it would be hilarious to see a pyr get bored halfway through the competition and just wander off. It probably wouldn't be as funny to the handler, though.

    Bro is also adorable. My favorite picture that you've posted is the one with Bijou with her first place agility ribbon. Then your comment saying she was the only one competing in her class. :{D

  5. #5
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Davey Benson's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lindsayface47 View Post
    Davey, apparently pyrs make amazing Autism service dogs. Service dogs for other disorders are needed to take direct commands from the handler. However, Autism service dogs need to be able to think on their own, and make up their own mind as to what to do. It also helps that pyrs naturally make order out of chaos (when they're not causing it themselves), which Autism definitely can be.
    I hadn't even thought about pyrs as autism service dogs, when you said service dogs I automatically thought things like military, or service labs for paraplegic or quadriplegic people. I just couldn't see someone in a wheel chair getting a pyr motivated to open the front door or call 911 if there was a fire.

    I think pyrs would make perfect autism service dogs.
    Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read. Groucho Marx

  6. #6
    Old Dawg (Senior Member)

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    Yeah, they'd most definitely be awful physical service dogs. I'm just imagining using one for guide work, and having them decide they want to go the other way. You'd never get anywhere you wanted to go!

    The one physical command I would need them to do would be "Brace," which is to stiffen their whole body so I can put my weight on them temporarily. My autonomic system is a mess, so when I stand up too fast, my blood pressure crashes and I get really dizzy and sometimes faint. I mostly get by with grabbing onto walls/chairs/other people, but if there's nothing there, BOOM. On the floor.

  7. #7
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Tsunibear's Avatar

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    Well I know they can learn to stiffen up for that. I am not graceful and fall often and Missy is always by my side at home for that sole purpose she doesn't trust me walking up and down the stairs alone and so when I am falling she braces herself and stops me from hitting the floor.

  8. #8
    Old Dawg (Senior Member)

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    I know that feeling. I'm currently making homemade dog treats, and I burned the crap out of my middle finger on my right hand. Argh. I pretty much can't walk without tripping and injuring myself somehow. *sheepish grin*

    I had a really bad syncopic (dizzy) episode earlier today while I was walking Oliver. I bent down to do some poop scooping, and got really dizzy. Usually when I stand back up it passes, but it didn't this time. I guess I started wavering around, because Oliver came over to me and stood right next to me. I put my hand on him to keep steady. I love that little bugger. He'd have made an awful service dog, though. Smart enough, and willing enough. Just too protective.

    Missy is a fantastic dog. Just thought you should know, in case you aren't told so every second of every day. I love dogs that are so naturally attuned to their owners/people parents. Oliver's like that. My lab on the other hand is so oblivious she'll literally walk headfirst into you if she's distracted. She's a special one, that's for sure. All she wants in life is cuddles, and that's perfectly fine by me.

  9. #9
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) mips's Avatar

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    I can agree with a Pyr not being very biddable, I guess I have a Pyr that's 'quite' biddable... He's 19 weeks now and we're doing obedience training since he's 11 weeks. He's best in class... I even had the instructor come to me and tell me "Sorry I don't drop by with you so much, but he's doing so well that I sometimes forget him"

    At home, you see him thinking "Is the reward big enough?" and "Is what you're asking me necessary?", if the answer is no to either, he wont do it most of the time. But at the lessons (with the other dogs) he's like ... "I wanna be the best in class", so he does everything according to textbook. I only have to explain my boy once or twice what I want from him and he understands.

    He loves going to 'school' and during the lessons if I ask him 'sit' or 'down', he sits/drops himself instantly, or if no one is watching a little less instantly, but he does do it. I don't expect a dog not to think for his own, in fact I wouldn't even like it, but I can tell that Chico likes the classes, even though he doesn't always listen at home.

    I think it really depends on the Pyr, if you like doing obedience with your dog, I'd say, give it a try. I'm going to keep doing it until he's a good way through puberty. I probably wont go on until we reach the level of actual competitions.

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