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  1. #11
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Liela's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

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    Our Liela also didn't see the inside of a house until we bought her home at 8 weeks. She LOVED the air conditioning and adapted really well. She did cry randomly for the first 2 days, but after that, she was fine.

    I think having them live outside that young had the dogs well potty trained. Until she got her UTI, she never made a potty mistake. Without any training, she cries at the door or follows one of us around crying and running to the door. She even knew to wake us up to go out in the middle of the night by nudging us with her nose (we just moved so our mattress is on the floor and within easy reach of her nose).

  2. #12
    Young Dawg (Member)

    Prospective Great Pyrenees Owner

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    Default Perfect!!

    I love that I found thus particular post and this forum! I'm in the same position as you! Next week I am possibly picking up a 12 week old new addition to our family! We are so excited! I want nothing more than to be fully Eeducated on this decision. Here is my story.
    I have a 13 year old lab who we love dearly. I've had him since I was 12 years old, I'm an only child and he has been my world, my guardian, my boy. So I've been interested in the great pyr. For a while now. I love the whole big dog thing, and gentle giant persona. We have a five year old little boy and I'm looking for a kid friendly dog. I feel that this breed will be a good match. From what I've read and heard they are gentle and good with children as well as other pets.
    Ok so I've also read now on this site in particular all of the possible struggles with this breed. Her are my worries.... I worry that the whole dominance thing will go negatively my lab is pretty submissive but I have been his for 13 years. I worry that the new pyr will push him away from me or take the dominant roll and something bad would happen. My lab Lucky is my works and my priority right now.
    Ok so i also worry with their protective loyal ways that someone will rough house with me or walk in my house unexpected and the pyr will attack??? What I love about my lab is that I NEVER have to worry about him being aggressive. I don't want a 120 lb plus dog attacking someone or an other pet that doesn't NEED to be attacked.
    So long story short, I'm looking for a family dog to give a ton of love and affection to, I appreciate their loyalty and companionship but worry that they are a liability? I plan to take every training procaussion and continue doing my homework now and long after we get the puppy. But again I'd like to make an educated decision. The information on this site kind of scared me a little... Can anyone help a little?? Thanks!!

  3. #13
    Young Dawg (Member)

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    I apologize for my awful grammar and poor spelling! I'm writing from an I phone

  4. #14
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Allison_V's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

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    With any dog you have you socialize them from the start, I've personally never met a pyr who attacked anyone so I don't think you'll have to worry about that! Let me put it this way, I have a 4 yr old Eskie who's 17lbs and I would be more worried shed attack some one before my marley girl did. They may bark to alert you that someone has came up to their property but won't attack. They truly are gentle giants! As for bringing in a new pup to your dog I recommend having different genders in the dogs, they dont tend to battle for dominance as much if they opposite *** and tend to get along much better this way. we should've done that but we have two females so tensions run high at moments but that should calm down once marley gets fixed, she tries to assert her dominance but fails and ends up submitting to our older dog even though our Eskie is quite smaller than her. If brought up and trained early on you have nothing to worry about! They really are amazing dogs in every aspect and make great family dogs!
    “A dog doesn’t care if you’re rich or poor, educated or illiterate, clever or dull. Give him your heart and he will give you his." - John Grogan, Marley & Me

  5. #15
    Young Dawg (Member)

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    Thank you so much alison_V ! That brought a little confidence back! I just worry about my old man and the liability of a huge potentially aggressive territorial dog. I know I can put the time and effort into socializing and training. I'm a believer in that a dogs owner is responsible for its demeanor. (Most cases) I feel that with pit bulls you have the power to make it go one way or an other. But I also believe its probably a lot easier to turn a pit MEAN than it would be say a lab or retriever. As I said I just want to be aducated and informed of what I'm up against. I know this will be a BIG dog and a BIG responsibility. I just don't want anything bad happening against my power. Thank you again and again!

  6. #16
    Young Dawg (Member)

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    An other question, is it has hard as they say it is to get the breed to "stay" I have a REALLY good fence. But accidents happen... I worry he will get out and "defend" his neighborhood, or get hurt. Or slip his collar etc... They say they are very very stubborn, is that something I can avoid? Or the enviable?

  7. #17
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) MiyasMomma's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

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    Jay-mi, they are the BEST dogs for kids. My Miya is 9mos and loves my God-daughter's who are 5 and 9mos.

    As far as attack, I really don't think so. They are barkers, they will bark their head off if they don't like something, you will have plenty of warning they are unhappy.

    I don't think they are stubborn. They are very smart dogs who evaluate things unlike other dog breeds. You have to work to be their partner and have their trust and you will have a great relationship. There will be speed bumps, I'm having one right now but you as long as you are committed to being a very involved alpha you'll work thru it.

    I've said on here before, this is an amazing breed of dog and we are all blessed to share our lives with them. I believe it takes the ultimate pet parent to be a Pyr owner, but I also believe the relationship you share with your Pyr is unlike any other dog you've ever had. They are very special dogs.

    Hope that helps put your mind alittle more at ease.
    Miya's Momma

    Because a home isn't a home without a dog.


  8. #18
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Allison_V's Avatar

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    Their "stubborn" tendancies I think better belong to their strong willed nature and independence, but thats my personal opinion. I personally think my other dog is more stubborn than the two pyrs Ive personally had (one we rescued and fostered and the other is our now Marley girl) Now dont get me wrong, any puppy you get will have their stubborn days, thats to be expected with any breed, heck my child is far more stubborn that my dogs and hes 2.5
    This breed was literally taken and placed with their "flocks" they didnt get any formal training on how to guard or protect or patrol, it was instinct and just came natural to them so they are insanely smart and instinctive dogs and they will act on their instincts. Its best to make sure you have a fenced off yard for them, they natually want to roam because its genetically marked in them to do so. How big is your fence? If you truly worry shell get out then I recommend running an electric underground fence along it as well to help train her to stay in. We only have a 4 ft chain link fence (our neighborhood regulations will not allow a fence taller than 4 ft so we cant go bigger) so we have marley trained that the fence is her yard, not outside the fence, inside. my husbands grandma lives next door and she goes to the fence and sits and watches and usually whines a little because we arent with her in the fence, but she doesnt try to escape in any way and I hope it remains that way so we dont have to turn on the underground fence, but we will if needed. They are one of the best breeds you could ask for. I say that because Im also very partial to Eskie's, so my life is made with both my eskie and pyr
    If you do your research, ask lots of questions on topics youre unsure of and are commited and patient you will make a fabulous pyr owner!!! And once you get the love and devotion from your pyr youll be so happy you made that choice!!
    “A dog doesn’t care if you’re rich or poor, educated or illiterate, clever or dull. Give him your heart and he will give you his." - John Grogan, Marley & Me

  9. #19
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Davey Benson's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

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    A great Pyrenees is not a dog, Jaymi_lea. It is a giant cat. Think that way and you will have no problems. Your pyr will act nothing like your lab. (it will act the most like a dog as a puppy, you say you will be adopting at 12 weeks, which is very young, and your puppy will be a puppy displaying puppy behavior, until the age of a year and a half.) Then you will call your pyr, and it might come, might not, just like a cat..... it will shed, and dig, and bark at night... a lot!
    Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read. Groucho Marx

  10. #20
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) SebastiansMom's Avatar

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    Welcome, Jaymi_lea!
    It really sounds like a Pyr could be a good fit for you and your family.
    First of all, don't let what you read in other posts scare you. Many people post mainly when they have problems. I often talk about Sebastian's problems, but fail to give him enough credit for the times that he stuns me with his good behavior. He is the best dog I've ever known.
    As long as you give the puppy plenty of love, proper manners training, and show good, calm, leadership, the pup is bound to be a wonderful addition to your family. You may have some problems with her from time to time, but that can be said about any dog of any breed.
    It is important to remember that Pyrs are not guard dogs, they are flock guardians. They have a procedure to get rid of threats, and "attack" only when it is absolutely necessary. I have seen that side of Sebastian only twice, and both times, he stayed right by my side and completely under my control the whole time. Sebastian and I don't have a dominant/submissive relationship, we are partners who work together to stay safe. That is the type of relationship you want to have with your prospective Pyr.
    Your Pyr is not likely to be an obedience superstar, but s/he will have a type of intelligence that can not be taught. They are aware of everything. You will not have anyone come inside your home unannounced.
    Likewise, once you gain partner status, your Pyr will look to you to make the ultimate decision about what is or is not a threat. For example, when I order Pizza, and the delivery man arrives, Sebastian barks like crazy. Once I open the door, he understands that the pizza man is, in fact, awesome for bringing us Pizza, and wants nothing more than to thank him with a wagging tail, and a few rubs. Now, if that pizza man grabbed me, and Sebastian saw that I was scared by it (they can smell the changes in our body chemistry when we are anxious or afraid), he would bark his protective bark, and if that didn't work, he would use force. If the pizza man were my best friend and started tickling me, he would see it as a game and want to join in the fun.
    This scenario would play out exactly the same whether we were at home, at my mom's house, at work, at the park, etc, as Pyrs do not see territorial boundaries. Pyrs were bred to travel with their flock, protecting them as they moved throughout the region.
    My one word of caution would be to make sure that when your son has friends over to play, your Pyr is under your complete control at all times. I would strongly advise that with any dog, but especially with the giants, as they can easily hurt even the strongest adult on accident when they play. On rare occasions, dogs can mistake children's rough play (running and screaming around the yard) as a threat, and that is something you definitely don't want a Pyr to do.
    Sebastian is on Facebook!
    www.facebook.com/SirSaintSebastian

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