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  1. #1
    Young Dawg (Member)

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    Default Training to Come When Called

    We've had our 3-month old male Great Pyrenees for about 2 weeks. When we picked him up he was quite shy. He is doing much, much better. However, unless we are standing extremely close to him (a few feet) with a treat in hand, he will totally ignore us or run the other way when called. I have alpacas coming in a couple of weeks and before I turn him out with them I feel that it is important that he comes when called. Otherwise we may never be able to catch him for shots, worming etc. Each time he runs away when we call I feel like we are teaching him to run away from us. Is he just too young and distractible? Any training ideas are welcome. Thanks!!

  2. #2
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) TexasKat's Avatar

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    Pyrs are notorious for ignoring 'come' 'commands'. (I'm working here, can'cha see?")

    At best, they come when they're called once they've decided that they don't have something more important to do. Practice making yourself more interesting... treats.... play... praise... a 'game' of some sort and maybe you'll get him to come 30% of the time.

    I wish I were teasing, but it's a breed trait really.

  3. #3
    Young Dawg (Member)

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    If not coming is a breed trait, then how does one hand giving shots and worming? It's one thing to not be able to get him to come to me while we are just in the barn. It will be quite another once he is in a small pasture.

  4. #4
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) TexasKat's Avatar

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    Scout and I play a game of 'can't catch me' sometimes when it's time to come inside and he doesn't want to. It IS a game, though, not a chase -- he stays close enough to make the game possible (it's more fun for him that way). I can use a leash as a lasso and as soon as I 'catch' him, he trots into the house (regardless of whether I still have hold of the 'lasso' or not -- usually I let it go).

    He has to trust you that good things will happen if he comes to you. You have to avoid 'catching/calling' him just to go somewhere unpleasant like the vet.

  5. #5
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Dee Dee Ro's Avatar

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    You wil only continue to lose if you view it as "catching the dog." Dee Dee, my sweet P, came to me with an abused, sad, scared, skittish. She played "keep-away" as a game. Slow, slow, slow, my friend. Dee Dee spends a lot of time on an 80 foot "skyline," with a 20' lead off of that. She has plenty of access to the porch, her "girl cave" under the porch, her dawg condo, two stands of spruce and can also come in the house. If she starts barking at night, I give her one chance, calling her to me. If she wants to be miss stubborn girl(one of her favorite personalities), I sit on the porch, tug her lead and wait...She doesn't always get a snack for good behavior, but she is more often than not, starting to come to me. No matter how bad I wanted to, I never punish her for not immediatly responding. I just wait. Patience is the absolute operative word with my puppy. I let her make it her own idea, even though it is really my idea.

  6. #6
    Young Dawg (Member)

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    Quote Originally Posted by TexasKat View Post
    He has to trust you that good things will happen if he comes to you. You have to avoid 'catching/calling' him just to go somewhere unpleasant like the vet.
    I think that is part of the problem. We are currently keeping him in a 10 x 8 foot kennel in the barn until he gets used to the chickens. Don't want him killing any of them. He gets his 'out' time when we are in the barn. We play and give him treats when he comes, but he has also figured out that at the end he has to go back into his kennel...ie unpleasant.

  7. #7
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Dee Dee Ro's Avatar

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    I go through the same thing with Dee Dee, "catch me if you can." One thing that has helped me, is I lay down on the ground, no words, no movement. Her caring and curiousity brings her to investigate, everytime, then I can grab her collar. Although I hopefully am maintaining a level of appropriate hierarchy, she is soooooo strong and so stubborn. Typical teenager-she knows it all.

  8. #8
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Dee Dee Ro's Avatar

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    For some reason, ignoring Dee Dee seems to get the most positive response. She gets the funniest, most quizzical look on her face, her brow furrowed. I just get busy doing something else and sure enough, here comes the Pyr puppy. Gotta remember, the whole world is completely new to the big white fluffy. She just thinks she knows what she wants to do. It's up to me that she realizes what I want her to do is also what she wants to do

  9. #9
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) TexasKat's Avatar

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    Do you give him 'out' time with you anywhere other than the barn?

    Pyrs can be taught to guard chickens, but being with chickens is not the same as bonding with 4-footed livestock.

    Maybe you can get him used enough to the leash to patrol the boundry with him several times a day.

  10. #10
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Dee Dee Ro's Avatar

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    My retired service dawg, Mogi, a Newfie/Lab, 11 years young, has helped so much with Miss Dee Dee. If I play ball with him, no matter where Dee Dee may be, she wants to play ball, mainly to get it away from her brother. Unfortunately, Dee Dee has become (and gaining) uber protective of both myself and Patrick. She bullies the old timer, Mogi; not really aggressive, but definitely being a brat, sometimes even snapping and growling. Mogi has such a mellow disposition, he just stays out of her way, goes and lays on his pillows. If Dee Dee approaches his pillows, his old crippled, cancered body just gets up, moves off the pillows, allowing her to be a pillow hog. The pillows take up a four x six foot area. I don't like to interfere if there is no overt violence between the dawgs, just wish I knew how to teach her to cut her brother some slack. By the way, yesterday, dawgs were laying butt to butt, basking in the sun, like nothing had happened an hour before. I try to just let them sort it out. If it got down to it, Mogi could seriously hurt the puppy, but he is a real gentleman around her.

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