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  1. #1
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Davey Benson's Avatar
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    Default Komondor (non pyr)

    I was interested in a Komondor, and I was wondering if anyone here has had any first hand experience with that breed, perhaps someone on the show circut.

    I know there are all sorts of breed differences, but I was wondering if mentally/phycologically are they basically a Great Pyrenees in Dreadlocks?



    I was wondering how one would get along with a great pyrenees.
    Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read. Groucho Marx

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    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Tsunibear's Avatar
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    I have seen one in person before and it was friendly and all but other then that I know nothing. I have done those dreads before on a Puli though that is a pain in the butt to do, or at least it was for me who had never done it before.

    Are thinking about getting one Davey?

  3. #3
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Davey Benson's Avatar
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    I was. My local vet clinic had a client looking to re-home one. Another week of triple digit temps makes me not want another large hair.

    The only first hand experience I've had with one was a puppy. It belonged to someone who was visiting my neighbor, and he wasn't around my two pyrs.

    As a puppy, they have very fine soft hair, but they don't grow into dreads until they are mature.

    I'm guessing they must not be a very common breed, since there isn't much imput about them here.
    Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read. Groucho Marx

  4. #4

    Flock Guardian (Moderator)


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    All other LGD"s are more aggressive than pyrs, but in saying that, there are exceptions so treat each dog separately. www.lgd.org is a good site and information.
    The fur is what would be a deal breaker for me. I love the pyr because they dont get dirty, they are easy to keep. Koms are nightmares, if the fur gets wet takes three days to dry! The smell! I saw one at a dog show, I just about fell over with the stench, I can hardly believe the judge actually touched such a smelly dog!

  5. #5
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Jewel's Avatar
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    No first hand experience, just heard from someone we know who have hundreds of sheep and a pack of LGDs including a komondor. All of the LGDs on this ranch are hardcore working dogs with very little human handling. The komondor was described as one of the fiercest of their LGDs which included pyrs. The komondor has no preference for humans and the humans don't try to handle her if at all possible. One time she had a litter of pups, and the ranch was doing some controlled burning of their fields and her den was right in the field where they were going to burn. They knew her den was there and so the ranch owner's daughter was going to move the pups while another person was to stand ready with a gun - the person was instructed to shoot the komondor if she charged, for they had no doubt that if she charged her intentions would have been to kill. They had quite a healthy respect for that dog. Luckily she did not charge, as she seemed to have realized the humans meant no harm. Whlie the komondor was described as fierce and don't try to pet her, there was no mention of her being aggressive toward her fellow LGDs. Furthermore, there are working herding dogs on the ranch and it sounded like the LGDs did not interfere with the herding dogs doing their jobs.

  6. #6
    Road Dawg
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    Default Komondors vs Pyr's

    Hello!

    I have had some experience with Komondors. As a breed there are some significant differences. Pyr's tend to use their size and voice as a first line of defence - Komondors tend to be a bit more forward. Komondor's tend to be quieter then Pyr's and are usually much more active.

    They are beautiful dogs but do tend to require much more significant grooming then Pyr's. I know some keep their coats short but I'm guessing that is not preferred.

    Hope that helps!

  7. #7
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Davey Benson's Avatar
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    Thanks for the input.

    Actually I think the maintanance might be the deal breaker for me too. Pyrs are very low maintanance, just brush out from time to time, and keep on top of the nails. From what I have read, the Komondors require quit a bit more fuss, if they are to be the domesticated variety.

    I'm actually considering adding sheep to the farm menu, but my dogs would still not be considered LGDs. (although I've caught my female pyr out with my cattle on a couple different occassions, just checking the animals out.) My dogs are really just overgrown pets. I'm not planning to get a large enough flock to justify going out specifically to get LGDs.

    I think I should just concentrate my time and resources with the kids I already have.

    Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read. Groucho Marx

  8. #8
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Tsunibear's Avatar
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    Davey if you ever do decide to get a Komondor just don't do the dread locks. Keep it short or keep it brushed out so it doesn't dread. I have seen them without the dreads before and I have been told they are easier to up keep without the dreads. If you don't plan on showing the dog then the dreads aren't mandatory.

  9. #9
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Davey Benson's Avatar
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    Oh that's interesting to read. I was told by one owner that the dreds just naturally occured, so I just assumed it was like a force of nature that couldn't be stopped. (sort of like how my hair goes into a "fro" if I let it get long and it gets humid out)

    Well, I've had plenty of time to think about it today, and I think I will pass on this one for the time being. I really want to wait to adopt when I have a surplus of resources to invest in another dog, I don't want to short change any of the dogs I already have.

    Thanks again for the input.
    Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read. Groucho Marx

  10. #10
    Puppy (New Member)
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    Thumbs up

    I am currently a Komondor owner, and a previous great pyr owner. As far as everyone saying get rid of the cords....I'll say otherwise. My dogs coat didn't dread all by its self, but around joints and under his neck did. The rest was done by hand and took some time, but really isn't that difficult. The reason I say keep it is because they were meant to have it for a reason, it keeps them warm in winter, and also cooler in the summer. It'll help block it's vision somewhat when their not moving so therefore he's more able to relax until the threat is very close. Then he leeps to the rescue and more often then not this will spook almost anything because they thought he was a sheep or asleep. Also would you get a great py to keep his beautiful flowing coat cut short to an inch? Without the hair they don't look that imposing and therefore aren't a komondor.
    Temparement is very similar, but i only have experience with one dog from each of these two breeds. And i found the kom to be more vigilant in his guarding, and more playful at playtime. My vision is partially distorted though because my kom is only 41/2 years old presently and we haven't had the pyr for 14 years now. he was 13 when he died and at that time i was 15 years old. So maybe if i remembered better how he was when he was younger i would have something different to tell you.
    I do plan on getting another pyr in the next few years and I think the interaction between the two will solely fall on how the owner introduces them and socialize them. I don't think you should have any problems.
    hope this was helpful.

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