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  1. #1
    Puppy (New Member)
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    Default How to keep Great Pyrenees in the fence

    We have just installed 5-wire hi tensile fence, every other wire is hot. Our Great Pyrs walk right through it. We would like them stay with the sheep flock they are supposed to be guarding. Any suggestions on how to keep them in the fence. Are they just too insulated with all the hair? Would it help to groom them? The dogs are brother and sister, both neutered, about 2 1/2 years old.

    Thanks,
    Chris Ault
    Ault's Family Farm

  2. #2
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Kate53's Avatar
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    Guess the wires aren't "hot" enough?? Fencing + GP = "Darn, there they go again!" They are most likely scoping out new territory. A different fence might be the only answer, but will probably be a major expense. Perhaps you will need to look into changing the current?

  3. #3
    Old Dawg (Senior Member)
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    The wires aren't touching the dog. Electric fences only work when the wire touches skin. Hair is an insulator and have you see how much hair a Pyr has? I've found dead ticks who have died of starvation trying to dig thru Leo's fur. You need to put a fence up that they can't walk thru. You Pyr has decided the territory you marked off with your fence is too small and he needs to guard the larger area. He could also be going to investigate smells of predators he thinks may be too close. Does he go thru with any sense of urgency? Like he is going after something or is he just meandering out of the fenced in area. Has he bonded with the sheep? How long has he been with them? If he doesn't yet see the sheep as "his" then he won't show a huge interest in staying with them. He may just need more time with them if he is new. I would talk to a farmer who has Pyr's as LGD's and see how they introduce new dogs to flocks.
    Rocky - 11 yr old YLR - Loves frisbees, tennis balls, and swimming.

    Leo - 4 yr old Pyr - Very confused Pyr... Likes to fetch - sometimes, likes to swim - sometimes, likes to cuddle - most times, and thinks he may be a Lab - sometimes...

  4. #4
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) mills1950's Avatar
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    What type of charger are you using and how long is the fence? Could be you need to add more grounding rods spaced further apart add more hot wires near the bottom. I use the same system for a five mile fence however I use a 100 mile fence charger---gives alot more shock----in fact if I put my arm close to fence the hairs on my arms rise and any closer would arc to me----all animals will sense this very easily and know not to go any closer.

  5. #5
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) DPW's Avatar
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    Like Mills said, the type of energizer and number of, and length, of grounding rods make a big difference. And if you're dealing with dry conditions some fences won't work as well.
    There IS another way to introduce animals to an electric fence. Find some type of soft food product they like. Something you can smear on a tin can lid. Firmly attatch the can lid to a hot wire and wait for your Pyr's to lick off the goodies. A wet nose or tongue is an excellent conductor of electricity.
    Some may find this cruel but todays electric fences are built so as not to permanantly harm animals. Makers of electric fence equipment would not stay in business very long with that kind of liability.
    I have not had to use this method mysyelf. I read about it in a book on raising goats. Our Pyr discovered one of our electric fences when he was three months old. He started sniffing it and got popped. He's only been shocked once.
    Once shocked most animals will stay clear of the fence.

  6. #6
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) ragingbull83's Avatar
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    I know your GP is an animal but hooking them up to an electric deal sounds like itd hurt. Dont think anyone in here would like getting hooked up to a battery If your keeping your GP outside id try a good secure fence make sure to put a little Quickcrete around the edges to keep them from digging under. Use the Electric as a lost option but thats just me its your GP do what youd like.
    Guess after mine has grown on me cant treat him like just another dog.
    Kenny G,

  7. #7
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) ragingbull83's Avatar
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    O sorry missed the part about them being working GPs i retract my previous statement
    Kenny G,

  8. #8
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) DPW's Avatar
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    Did someone suggest "hooking" up a dog to an electric fence? Personally I don't think I'd try that.
    But intentionally causing a dog to get zapped is simply a method to train the dog to stay away from the fence. Does it hurt? Somewhat. For a split second. Stepping on a rusty 10d nail hurts more. I get zapped now and then. It's not fun. Not supposed to be.
    I have never heard of a dog being injured by an electric fence. Cars on the other hand.....well let's just say I worry A LOT more about my dog getting out on the road than I am of him being hurt by an electric fence.

  9. #9
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) ragingbull83's Avatar
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    I was just kidding with ya Dpw yes electric fence works well but a weak voltage doesnt faze a super sized bear like dog very much what do you recommend I have a great fence at the house but at the office i might go for an electric fence?
    Kenny G,

  10. #10
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) DPW's Avatar
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    Well Mr. Bull the folks at Premier 1 make a number of portable electric netting fences that just might fit the bill at your office. I use two of them here on the farm. Wish I could afford more.
    They do a great job of keeping Cider out of where he's not supposed to be. Of course that only leaves him with about 100 acres to run around on all day long. Poor guy. A hundred plus acres of open hills, timber, and a creek to run, walk, roam over wherever he wants to. All day long. Every day. Without a leash. He's loved and cared for as well as any dog in the country.
    Yep, the life of a working Pyr is surely one of cruelty, hardship and abuse.
    Now I'll be serious. There is no doubt in my mind that some working Pyr's have it rougher than Cider. But I'll bet you dollars to dog biscuits that more Pyr's are abandoned by city folk who had no business in the first place acquiring a large breed dog to live in cramped quarters with a postage stamp sized yard.
    You see a working Pyr is an important asset to the rancher. A valuable employee as well as companion. Only an idiot would treat the protector of their livestock poorly. Their livestock is their livelyhood.
    Every person I know who has LGD's, nine all together, treat their dogs as well as any other family member.
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