Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 22
  1. #11
    Young Dawg (Member) GNeedham's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Houston, Tx
    Posts
    12

    Default

    I agree with "fluffylove",
    Train your dogs. The pyr breed is still new to me but I have worked with a number of dogs as I spent time as an apprentice for a trainer, as well as all the dogs I have worked with. The Pyr that I am a foster for had no idea how to walk on a leash. He tried the typical pulling me around which lasted about one day.
    I use a 6' leather lead, and a slip chain... or as yall call them "choke chains".
    Here is what I do and it has worked for all the dogs I have been with.
    You want the dog to always be on a loose leash. There should ALWAYS be slack in the leash. You can do this in your backyard, garage, living room, driveway, you dont have to go for a walk in order to teach them how to walk on a leash.
    Put the lead on your dog with the slip chain. Stand facing the dog with the lead held to your chest with both hands. When you are ready to take a few steps backwards just do it, dont telegraph your movement to your dog. You want them to have to pay attention to you in order not to be corrected. If when you step backwards and your dog doesnt stay close you give a good quick correction with the leash. If you give them a "come on boy" when you move then are going to just hinder your progress and make things harder. Just keep moving around and giving your dog the corrections untill he learns that the only way he wont be corrected is to focus on you. When you take a few steps one way, turn quickly and head the other way if the leash starts to tighten from the dog lagging behind then give a correction. If when your correction causes them to try and run right past you in the direction of the correction, then guess what ? you turn and head the other way again.
    When you give a correction its important to give a quick "jerk" with the leash and not a tug or pull. Theres no way a slip chain can hurt if used correctly, but it can if your dog pulls and chokes himself or if you are constantly pulling on it and keeping it tight.
    Greg Needham
    http://www.needhamsobedience.com
    Foster Parent for The Great Pyrenees Rescue Society http://gprescuesociety.org

  2. #12
    Road Dawg Belanas_mum's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    35

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GNeedham
    I agree with "fluffylove",
    Train your dogs. The pyr breed is still new to me but I have worked with a number of dogs as I spent time as an apprentice for a trainer, as well as all the dogs I have worked with. The Pyr that I am a foster for had no idea how to walk on a leash. He tried the typical pulling me around which lasted about one day.
    I use a 6' leather lead, and a slip chain... or as yall call them "choke chains".
    Here is what I do and it has worked for all the dogs I have been with.
    You want the dog to always be on a loose leash. There should ALWAYS be slack in the leash. You can do this in your backyard, garage, living room, driveway, you dont have to go for a walk in order to teach them how to walk on a leash.
    Put the lead on your dog with the slip chain. Stand facing the dog with the lead held to your chest with both hands. When you are ready to take a few steps backwards just do it, dont telegraph your movement to your dog. You want them to have to pay attention to you in order not to be corrected. If when you step backwards and your dog doesnt stay close you give a good quick correction with the leash. If you give them a "come on boy" when you move then are going to just hinder your progress and make things harder. Just keep moving around and giving your dog the corrections untill he learns that the only way he wont be corrected is to focus on you. When you take a few steps one way, turn quickly and head the other way if the leash starts to tighten from the dog lagging behind then give a correction. If when your correction causes them to try and run right past you in the direction of the correction, then guess what ? you turn and head the other way again.
    When you give a correction its important to give a quick "jerk" with the leash and not a tug or pull. Theres no way a slip chain can hurt if used correctly, but it can if your dog pulls and chokes himself or if you are constantly pulling on it and keeping it tight.
    This is the method we learned at Puppy K, and I have to say - it is great advice. I was originally using the choker for Belanas walks, figuring that if she pulled too hard, she would cause herself enough discomfort to stop pulling. Wrong. The choker should be used as explained above. It honestly hasn't taken us much effort at all, and Belana barely tugs on her leash at all. Once in a while she stops paying attention to me because she found something that smells interesting, but with a little tug, she is back on track.

    I honestly don't feel a harness is a good idea to walk any dog, save maybe teeny weeny things. Pyrs are prone to dominance issues and get so big! The breed is new to me too, but there is no way that we can physically force these dogs to do anything. They really need to be well trained. (Belana is only 50lbs, but she is strong, and I'm only 5'3". She could very easily take me off my feet if she wanted too. Especially in this slippery weather)!

    For a little while each day, I put Belana on her 6' leash and take her around the house with me on daily chores. There's a lot of turning this way and that, so she has no choice but to focus on me. She actually really likes it, and I can easily stick in a few commands here and there at whim to test her obedience when we've distractions (she goes crazy silly when one of our cats are in the room). When I take off the leash, she still follows me around the house. She used to always be in the way, like she expected me to walk around her - not anymore! It also helps me keep an eye on her for chewing off-limit things (which she likes to do).

  3. #13
    Road Dawg

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    arnoldsville,ga
    Posts
    31

    Default

    I just switched to a gentle leader and that thing is awesome!!!! Don't matter how big he will get he want be able to pull me with that. He's actually getting to walk with me side by side with it.

  4. #14
    Young Dawg (Member) GNeedham's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Houston, Tx
    Posts
    12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Belanas_mum
    This is the method we learned at Puppy K, and I have to say - it is great advice. I was originally using the choker for Belanas walks, figuring that if she pulled too hard, she would cause herself enough discomfort to stop pulling. Wrong. The choker should be used as explained above. It honestly hasn't taken us much effort at all, and Belana barely tugs on her leash at all. Once in a while she stops paying attention to me because she found something that smells interesting, but with a little tug, she is back on track.

    I honestly don't feel a harness is a good idea to walk any dog, save maybe teeny weeny things. Pyrs are prone to dominance issues and get so big! The breed is new to me too, but there is no way that we can physically force these dogs to do anything. They really need to be well trained. (Belana is only 50lbs, but she is strong, and I'm only 5'3". She could very easily take me off my feet if she wanted too. Especially in this slippery weather)!

    For a little while each day, I put Belana on her 6' leash and take her around the house with me on daily chores. There's a lot of turning this way and that, so she has no choice but to focus on me. She actually really likes it, and I can easily stick in a few commands here and there at whim to test her obedience when we've distractions (she goes crazy silly when one of our cats are in the room). When I take off the leash, she still follows me around the house. She used to always be in the way, like she expected me to walk around her - not anymore! It also helps me keep an eye on her for chewing off-limit things (which she likes to do).
    Thats what Ive done with mine. Its good to mix up commands while doing things also. Put them on a down stay and carry on with your business close by. If or when you see them pop up from that down stay you rush over, grab the lead and put them right back down in the same spot. When they realize that you will stop doing whatever you are doing in order to correct they will be that much more apt to behave when you arent around also.
    Its important to use random praise when doing all this also. Im sure we all know how much they love a good firm pat on the chest and nice strong "goooood job". When you give your praise more randomly and not same tone each time he will be looking for that really strong praise more often. A good analogy to use would be to take a look at all the people playing slot machines in a casino. They are all sitting waiting paying attention just waiting in anticipation of a reward.
    Greg Needham
    http://www.needhamsobedience.com
    Foster Parent for The Great Pyrenees Rescue Society http://gprescuesociety.org

  5. #15
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Autumn & Jax's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Oklahoma City, OK
    Posts
    132

    Default walking on a leash

    My pyr is 3 mo old & walks great on his leash. I worked with him from 10 wks with a nylon choker & moved up to a chain choker as he got bigger. He does good with staying with me and staying up at a fast walk. I didnt think he was old enough at first but learned to sit, lay down, crawl, shake, and to give a high five in two days. So he was smart enough to walk on a leash. Just keep it up high. My grandmother uses a prong collar on her 8 mo old pyr, but she is 70, has a bad ankle & has had both knees replaced. She cant afford to get pulled around.

  6. #16
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Autumn & Jax's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Oklahoma City, OK
    Posts
    132

    Default walking on a leash

    Also forgot to add, I recently read to use a treat to get your dogs attention when they get distracted on the walk. Dont feed them, just use the scent to redirect them.

  7. #17
    Young Dawg (Member) GNeedham's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Houston, Tx
    Posts
    12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Autumn & Jax
    Also forgot to add, I recently read to use a treat to get your dogs attention when they get distracted on the walk. Dont feed them, just use the scent to redirect them.
    What would you do if you were walking and then a young child startled the dog or a squirrel all of sudden darted past you ? Would you quickly reach for your treat to "distract" the dog ? or would you want for the dog to take a disctraction like child, or squirrel as a que to pay even more attention to you and not anything else.
    Greg Needham
    http://www.needhamsobedience.com
    Foster Parent for The Great Pyrenees Rescue Society http://gprescuesociety.org

  8. #18
    Old Dawg (Senior Member) Autumn & Jax's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Oklahoma City, OK
    Posts
    132

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GNeedham
    What would you do if you were walking and then a young child startled the dog or a squirrel all of sudden darted past you ? Would you quickly reach for your treat to "distract" the dog ? or would you want for the dog to take a disctraction like child, or squirrel as a que to pay even more attention to you and not anything else.

    This is meant to be used on a young puppy when you are first teaching it to walk on a leash, not as a permanent tool.

  9. #19
    Old Dawg (Senior Member)

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    NA
    Posts
    481

    Default prong collar

    my pups walk really fabulous but they do dash off in play once in a blue moon (never roads, or walking paths) in specific places like beach, basketball court, football field. I have taught my young human ones (less than 10yrs old) to drop the leash whenevr they do a dash. So am thinking of getting prong for them. Is is good idea? Never used this collar b4
    Also, the male pup has a maddening impulse to jump into any water. Just jump 1st, ask later. He's gotten into too deep a trouble b4 and cant find a footing to get back up. It didnt deter him one bit.

  10. #20
    Young Dawg (Member) GNeedham's Avatar

    Current Great Pyrenees Owner

    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Houston, Tx
    Posts
    12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pyr haven
    my pups walk really fabulous but they do dash off in play once in a blue moon (never roads, or walking paths) in specific places like beach, basketball court, football field. I have taught my young human ones (less than 10yrs old) to drop the leash whenevr they do a dash. So am thinking of getting prong for them. Is is good idea? Never used this collar b4
    Also, the male pup has a maddening impulse to jump into any water. Just jump 1st, ask later. He's gotten into too deep a trouble b4 and cant find a footing to get back up. It didnt deter him one bit.
    I personally dont like prong collars. I have seen many of them break under alot less force than a regular slip chain. You can also put more force on them without any prongs sticking into your dogs neck. The prong collar will not do anything to keep your dog from pulling, you need to train him/her to walk on a loose leash and that distractions are a key to keep paying attention to you and only you. They will understand that they can choose to either indulge themselves and give chase and deal with the consequence, or to stay by your side and recieve praise.
    Think about when you are driving and you are coming up to a street light. The light turns yellow before you get there. Now you have the choice of either A)flooring it and making the light but running the risk of a correction (a traffic ticket) or B) Slow down, stop and be CONFIDENT that nothing is going to happen to you.
    Last edited by GNeedham; 01-11-2010 at 09:17 AM. Reason: more info
    Greg Needham
    http://www.needhamsobedience.com
    Foster Parent for The Great Pyrenees Rescue Society http://gprescuesociety.org

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •