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Basil
12-02-2006, 11:15 PM
basil is about 30 months now and is one of the sweetest dogs ever. we've had him since he was 3 months and although he pretty much destroyed our house and my wife's wardrobe :rolleyes: we've never had any real behavior concerns until last night...
he decided he liked the bag of beef jerky on the kitchen counter and tried to eat the whole thing. when my wife attempted to take the jerky away from him he viciously growled and snapped at her. i tried to restrain him by holding him behind his head. my wife was able to get the jerky, however i knew the minute i would let go of him he would come after me... which he did.
once i let go he snapped around and bit me in the arm while proceeding to growl and showing his fangs. i have never seen anything like this before and frankly it scared me. i decided just to tell him that behavior is not appropriate and ignored him for the rest of the night. it was obvious by his demeanor that he new he did something wrong. yet i'm worried. both my wife and i love him dearly. he's always been very sociable with other dogs and humans.

Christine
12-04-2006, 10:38 AM
Really sounds like you should be scared - you have a problem - a dog - especially your own should NEVER put his teeth on you. Somewhere along the line you have relinquished control of this dog, and he has the upper hand now, as he comes into adulthood.

If he destroyed your house and your wifes things as a puppy when presumably he was still within your means to control, yet you did not control him - you made him master.

You will probably need professional help, and you should start reading everything you can on controlling YOUR ALPHA MALE - OR something terrible could happen.

I hope you can correct this problem, because at heart I believe these dogs are wonderful - but your dog believes he is the leader of your house - and in his eyes you took the leaders beef jerky away!!

Renee
02-10-2007, 08:14 PM
I'm glad I am not the only one with an agressive pyrenees. :)

Christine
02-12-2007, 09:24 AM
If you dog is biting, I don't think you should be glad, you should be worried :confused:

Christine
02-12-2007, 09:24 AM
If your dog is biting, I don't think you should be glad - you should be worried :confused:

AMY
07-11-2007, 12:58 PM
If your dog is biting, I don't think you should be glad - you should be worried :confused:


Help! I have a 2year old pyr named Thor. He is so loved by me my husband and my 2 girls 4 and 7 years old. He is our second pyr. Having said that I knew we had to establish who was boss early and socialize him- which we have. The problem started right around the time he was turning 1. He started to be very over protective around his territory. He takes protecting his family very seriously.
One day my older daughters friend and neighbor came knocking at the door. The door wasnt locked so he charged at the door and opened it and lunged out and went to bite her growling and everything. Luckily she jumped back and I grabbed him. He tore her shirt and his eye tooth punctured her skin very slighlty and left a bruise on her rib cage.
We signed him up for obedience training immediately. We follow through with everything. He did well in class and we use what we learned with him daily. If anything I am alpha dog in my house, not my husband because I am home all the time with the kids and the dog. He listens to me the most.
Well we thought we had him under control. Yesterday my friend came to the house( a very hard thing because he is still so very protective) and I let her in while I commanded him in a sit position. As she came in I had her stand and talked to her and then let Thor sniff her out. Much to my surprise he got nasty growled and bit her in the leg. Luckily I am always on gaurd with him knowing he is protective and chocked him back with the choke chain. He didnt get the chance to rip her pants or break the skin but he did get her. He was very scary.
I love that dog more than anything but I am deeply worried, disappointed and very emotional distraught over this. He has always been so loving and great with my family and my children. I cannot live my life not letting anyone into my home. I need help! Is there any hope for us?

fluffylove
07-12-2007, 06:41 AM
This scares me, all these emails about pyrenees. Since you all say the dogs have been properly socialized, the next step I could do is contact the breeder. Pyrenees should NOT be like this, EVER!!! They are one of the better breeds with people, unlike Kuvasz, Kommondor, Maremma etc. Temperment is inherited and I would wonder what type of dogs people are breeding. That being said I found there is only one trainer that truly works to establish yourselves as an alpha pack leader. They helped us transform out dog completely, though we NEVER had human aggression, but we did have problems with other dogs, HUGE problems and our dog chewed on his feet constantly. Our dog now NEVER runs to the door now, he stops at our boundary we set up with our trainer and doesn't chew his feet. No physical boundary was ever put up, we established ourselves as alpha and the difference is incredible.

For those of you who may think my dog wasn't a problem, he's an intact, alpha pyr who is two years old, in the midst of his adolesence, and I have full control over him every where we go. It's not always easy, I have to stay on top of it. We even do rally obedience and he would've had his CKC title if I hadn't messed up some signs! Pyrs WILL pick up on weaknesses, even when you are sick and they WILL take over.

Please, if you haven't had a look already, check our barkbusters. I am not their peronal ambassador, nor do I want to seem like one. We had problems, they fixed it when NO ONE else knew what to do with him. I know how hard it is to have a problem dog. He used to be so bad, even a dog walking by him he would snap at just in passing!

Seriously consider them, they use training pouches, voice, a growl and body language. They will teach you how to be alpha and not hurt the dog. Our dog sulked for a week because he was confused at what was going on, "what, me not in control anymore? I'll give myself a weeks worth of time out to let you guys think about it" We won.

Good luck!!!

Christine
07-13-2007, 11:20 AM
Hard to gain too many facts from an e-mail, however, I'll just say this - THE SOCIALIZATION OF YOUR DOG MUST NEVER STOP. All our dogs must be socialized throughout their lives, otherwise they become over-shy, or over-protective. Dog Parks, family visits to and outside the home, walking, obedience training etc. When a dog becomes isolated to its own family only, it forgets how to behave around other people!!

Socializing for the first year IS NOT good enough.

AMY
07-19-2007, 05:28 PM
This is to Basil,

I was wondering how things worked out for you with your pup. We are having some issues with our male neutered pyr Thor who is 2 years 3 months old.

emcleve
09-18-2007, 01:03 PM
Basil's Mom and Dad

I would take Basil to the vet and have them run some blood and do a physical exam. IMHO, any unusual behavior of that extreme should be checked out to make sure there isn't anything physical going on.

I am a little concerned with the trend toward referring to dogs as the "alpha". A truely dominant dog is really a minority. The majority of dogs would prefer not to be in that role, but (and this is a big but) will fill it if no one else does. Their social structure demands it. So, if you aren't a leader, they will take over but that does not mean that they are actually a dominant dog.

kcoruol
09-28-2007, 01:22 AM
basil is about 30 months now and is one of the sweetest dogs ever. we've had him since he was 3 months and although he pretty much destroyed our house and my wife's wardrobe :rolleyes: we've never had any real behavior concerns until last night...
he decided he liked the bag of beef jerky on the kitchen counter and tried to eat the whole thing. when my wife attempted to take the jerky away from him he viciously growled and snapped at her. i tried to restrain him by holding him behind his head. my wife was able to get the jerky, however i knew the minute i would let go of him he would come after me... which he did.
once i let go he snapped around and bit me in the arm while proceeding to growl and showing his fangs. i have never seen anything like this before and frankly it scared me. i decided just to tell him that behavior is not appropriate and ignored him for the rest of the night. it was obvious by his demeanor that he new he did something wrong. yet i'm worried. both my wife and i love him dearly. he's always been very sociable with other dogs and humans.


IMHO
Never try to hold a pyr's head from behind while trying to take something from his mouth.

I have a pyr that bit a chain link fence so hard he bent the metal links and then grabbed the gate, which had 2 latches and locked, pulled it open by bending the latches inward, in the blink of an eye. He was trying to get at a dog who came into his yard. I've seen him bite a raw hide bone in half in about 3 chews.

In this situation, do one of two things, let him eat the beef jerky or offer him something else to get his attention away from the beef jerky like string cheese.

Note: I'm not a trainer.

When our puppies were young, we'd stick our hands down in their dog food while they ate it so they'd be familiar with that activity. At this point with your dog I wouldn't recommend doing this.

I'd try to get your dog use to the idea of your hand controlling his food. Feed him by hand, give him treats in a way that he won't snap at the treat, and if he starts putting out any bad vibes stop the activity until he is completely calm.

Pyrs are guard dogs bred to protect livestock from predatory animals. Pyrs will kill wolves and coyotes and have chased bears off. I've heard pyrs have the strongest bite of about 2500 lbs.

For the lady whose dog is biting people at her door. Seek professional help for your dog.

fluffylove
09-28-2007, 05:04 PM
If there is nothing physically wrong with your dog you NEED to obtain the #1 position in the house as right now, you are at the bottom with the rest of the pack. Pyrs are not always true alphas, but they are stubborn and if you don't take the lead, they will walk all over you. You need to get a trainer that doesn't train with food but with the idea that you become a competent, confident, calm assertive pack leader otherwise, you'll NEVER win these battles. Pyrs are smart and most trainers have no idea how to train them properly. I am taking training in January and will be able to train dogs such as yours. It can be done, I've seen it done in worse circumstances.

FYI : 1% of dogs are true Alpha's. I have one and often they are mislabled as agressive. ANY dog however will take control if you don't!!!!

BTW : Pyrs are food possessive because they had to fight off sheep for their food as they developed a taste for kibble over time.