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nanachickies
01-15-2011, 10:20 AM
Newbie to sight. New to raising the Great Pyr.
I am the proud parent to Scooter who is 10 weeks old. I have three questions. I am walking him around the property at 9am, at 1pm and at 4pm to get him aquainted to the property. The fencing will not be ready for a month or so. He then goes into a doggie pen 10' x 10'. He seems to be well mannered.
My questions:

Am I walking him too much?
When should I do training to guard chickens and goats?
What should I look for in regards to unruly behavior?

Chicag0_Red
01-15-2011, 11:36 AM
Newbie to sight. New to raising the Great Pyr.
I am the proud parent to Scooter who is 10 weeks old. I have three questions. I am walking him around the property at 9am, at 1pm and at 4pm to get him aquainted to the property. The fencing will not be ready for a month or so. He then goes into a doggie pen 10' x 10'. He seems to be well mannered.
My questions:

Am I walking him too much?
When should I do training to guard chickens and goats?
What should I look for in regards to unruly behavior?


Welcome to the site and to the wonderful world of being owned by a Pyr.

You don't say how big the property is so distance wise it is hard to say if you are walking him too much though I doubt it. He would be refusing to walk if he felt it was too much. As far as too often ,,, no

These guys get big fast and the hardest part about training him to guard livestock is at up to 2 years old they are still prone to very rough play and a Pyr can kill/maim/destroy a small animal like a chicken or goat kid on accident in a tenth of a second. There are a few resources here on training to be LGDs but he will guard as surely as he will get big. It is just what they do, the trick is convincing him that the chickens/goats are not to be played with. For the goats there are 2 issues to watch for, 1 big billys or does / dams (especially) can injure the dog or train him that goats are untrustworthy and potentially dangerous. That is the reason most LGDs are started with and trained by older working dogs. They protect the younger animals by preventing the aggressive flock members from injuring the young dog and protect the flock members from an over playful puppy.

I'm not sure what you are asking as far as unruly behavior. Could you be more definite in context?

Nice to see another Houston area Pyr on the board... we may have to schedule a South Texas get together.

_Red


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Puppylove
01-16-2011, 05:17 AM
Hey congrats on your new puppy! I too am a 1st time pry owner, my puppy is just 6 months old now. We have no other dogs so I have to be pack leader and set the rules about what is ok to play with and what's not. Cat's were terribly tempting and it didn't help that one of them would let the puppy chew on him :( The leave it command and redirecting to an appropriate toy has worked 99% of the time outside and 100% of the time inside. He now shares his bowl with all 4 cats. He is pretty good with the horses but still gets excited if they start running and playing. He hates 'time out' which for him is getting hooked in the sawdust shed. He is very smart and knows he has been naughty.

I have noticed that pyr's at least mine, are very 'mouthy' as in like to have something in their mouths, ie my hand as much as possible. What worked with Buddy is when ever he put my hand in his mouth I stopped the attention and said NO TEETH. He caught on that mouthing me meant no more attention. Also one thing I would suggest is no rough play with humans, EVER, he is going to get big fast! I started right off teaching him that I can claim food, toys etc anytime I want and I get to look in his mouth and handle his feet anytime as well. So far he has accepted me as leader and that should continue for the rest of his life. Pry's are extremely smart and they need to seem to have a reason to do as you ask.

KathyCS
01-16-2011, 08:53 AM
Hi there. We're new to the Pyr world as well. Our pup will be 9 weeks old on Wednesday and trust me I am always asking questions here and the advice I get is wonderful. We were on a waiting list for our pup, so I knew well before hand that we would be getting Bear so I started with the questions well before he was born, after he was born, and when we finally went to pick him up. I felt somewhat prepared to bring him home, but boy am I learning as I go. Congratulations on your new pup. I look forward to watching as your pup grows.

Jewel
01-16-2011, 09:20 AM
nanachickies, if you intend your pup to be a working dog I think you need to start training him to bond with the livestock he's supposed to protect right now. Here is the book that the members on this board with LGDs have highly recommended:

Livestock Protection Dogs
Author: Orysia Dawydiak, David E. Sims

pyr haven
01-16-2011, 09:26 AM
hi to another goat owner on board, welcome. What kind of goats and how many? ooops sorry this is a pyr site :) so a short indulgence

i started mine rather unconventionally, i am one of those who tot pyrs will bond with goats and sheep automatically. My pups were 4mths then way older but not impossible. It took a lot of dedication and hard work & lots of exercise esp my vocal chordÖ.

I got some really good advice from this site, in particular DPW owner of Cider but he hasnít been here a long time.

Ques does urs intend to be full time LGD?

Mine are not. So i was a pyr novice and a city girl at heart now struggling with livestock poop on floor/carpet on a daily basis.

My pyrs are treated like Paris Hilton's chi hua hua except they fit not into a Birkin handbag but into PYRmobiles (plus they sport mud coats most times, I think itís their pyr make-up)

1. Iíd get the book Livestock Protection Dog -Author: Orysia Dawydiak, David E. Sims
2. Talk to other farmers/livestock owners
3. Bond with the goats/chickens immediately (i mean the pup)
4. strong fence for the safety of ur pup
5. Puppies will chase
6. Chicken is a challenge, most of pyr owners i believe resort to keeping them separate
7. Not all pyrs are suited to be LGD

I spent a lot of time being their mother, that is the best advice i can give u. I watched over them like hawk. For one, I didnít have a holiday till they were at least 1.5 yrs :)

For most part, since i have a pair of pyr siblings they did terrorise everybody else. So any unwanted behaviour, chasing, rough play, nipping, herding must be corrected now. I just cant run as fast. An option is for the puppy to be trained by an older goat LGD if u can find one nearby.

Like Red said, and I am sure u are already aware that goats can seriously harm the pup. Lastly, do you have other dogs or threats to the livestock like coyotes in the area? Good luck and have fun, enjoy the puppy stage!

nanachickies
01-18-2011, 03:56 PM
nanachickies, if you intend your pup to be a working dog I think you need to start training him to bond with the livestock he's supposed to protect right now. Here is the book that the members on this board with LGDs have highly recommended:

Livestock Protection Dogs
Author: Orysia Dawydiak, David E. Sims

Thank you for the information. I will get the Livestock Protection Dogs book. As to bonding w/animals, well the fence isn't up yet and may not be completely finished for a month or so. I am presently walking him around the property he will be responsible for 3 times a day.

nanachickies
01-18-2011, 03:58 PM
hi to another goat owner on board, welcome. What kind of goats and how many? ooops sorry this is a pyr site :) so a short indulgence

i started mine rather unconventionally, i am one of those who tot pyrs will bond with goats and sheep automatically. My pups were 4mths then way older but not impossible. It took a lot of dedication and hard work & lots of exercise esp my vocal chordÖ.

I got some really good advice from this site, in particular DPW owner of Cider but he hasnít been here a long time.

Ques does urs intend to be full time LGD?

Mine are not. So i was a pyr novice and a city girl at heart now struggling with livestock poop on floor/carpet on a daily basis.

My pyrs are treated like Paris Hilton's chi hua hua except they fit not into a Birkin handbag but into PYRmobiles (plus they sport mud coats most times, I think itís their pyr make-up)

1. Iíd get the book Livestock Protection Dog -Author: Orysia Dawydiak, David E. Sims
2. Talk to other farmers/livestock owners
3. Bond with the goats/chickens immediately (i mean the pup)
4. strong fence for the safety of ur pup
5. Puppies will chase
6. Chicken is a challenge, most of pyr owners i believe resort to keeping them separate
7. Not all pyrs are suited to be LGD

I spent a lot of time being their mother, that is the best advice i can give u. I watched over them like hawk. For one, I didnít have a holiday till they were at least 1.5 yrs :)

For most part, since i have a pair of pyr siblings they did terrorise everybody else. So any unwanted behaviour, chasing, rough play, nipping, herding must be corrected now. I just cant run as fast. An option is for the puppy to be trained by an older goat LGD if u can find one nearby.

Like Red said, and I am sure u are already aware that goats can seriously harm the pup. Lastly, do you have other dogs or threats to the livestock like coyotes in the area? Good luck and have fun, enjoy the puppy stage!

Thank you for all the information. As a new owner I am learning from scratch. Since I don't have the fence up or the goats yet I am walking him 3 times a day around the area he will be responsible for. So far, so good.

Jewel
01-18-2011, 04:31 PM
nanachickies, you might want to consider adopting an older, already trained female LGD to train your pup. Sometimes an older dog will stop a pup from chasing the livestock as that's a no-no. Red is in your general area and is involved with rescues so he may have contacts for you if you would consider taking in an older proven LGD. Another option was suggested by, I think, TexasKat (also in TX), to another member about fostering an experienced LGD as a means to teach a new LGD pup.

pyr haven
01-19-2011, 01:04 AM
just a little concern that a month may be too long, the earlier the intro/mixing the better and easier to train. Is there any way for u to supervise the pup together with some well behaved goat kids on a daily basis?
This is very much an individual personality thing, some goats take very well to dogs and some just don't.