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Black Angel
05-17-2010, 06:30 AM
My Pyr is now 1 1/2, Saturday nitght we were watching TV, my husband went to get up, and Bear got into attack mode, he actually bit him on the arm. Last night the same thing he was fine during the day, Bill got up to get something and Bear started growling and I had to hold him back, nothing was done to him and this just started in the last 2 days. It's strange that it only happen at night, any help would be appectiated.

Jan

indypyrenees
05-17-2010, 06:49 AM
Well I have only had my pyr for 5 days but she does seem more on guard at night could your husband possibly have strartled Bear? Is Bear neutered?

Maybe try taking Bear to the vet rule out any medical issues? That'd be my first stop. I have no other advice but hopefully this can be sorted out.

grtpyrlvr
05-17-2010, 07:10 AM
hmm.... Have you had Bear since he was a puppy? When you say he is "Bitting" your husband is it just mouthing? Or an intent to bite? Also out of curiosity how have you trained Bear? Did you do Dominance training? Positive Reinforcement etc?

Black Angel
05-18-2010, 06:52 AM
We were talking last night, my husband has a cast on his leg and and open wound from being a diabetic, we are thinking that Bear smells this and that's when he gets mean. He has to have the cast changed weekly until he has surgery. When he first gets the cast changed Bear seems fine this is the first week hes had it on seven days. Prior to him going to the foot doctor Bear would sniff his foot because he knew something was wrong.

The only thing dominant I trained him with, was standing in back of him and picking his front paws up and telling him I am the master, this is what they taught us at puppy training school, my husband does not discipline him, I do and its usually for doing something in the house and I bring him too the spot and say no, so if he should bite anyone it should be me.

Other than that hes been a great dog and we had him since he was 2 1/2 months old.

Black Angel
05-18-2010, 06:55 AM
Also he was not neutered.

grtpyrlvr
05-18-2010, 07:14 AM
My guess is that between the, not being neutuerd and the open wound his hormones are just going crazy. In the wild, a dog will naturally take out an injured pack member. This reaction can be more dramatic in an un altered animal.

fluffylove
05-18-2010, 06:57 PM
stop blaming this on the fact that he has testicles, it's got NOTHING to do with it. My pyrs are not neutered and they don't pull this stuff. An aggressive dog is aggressive before and after neutering. I would NEVER neuter a dog with any issues, EVER! Behavior often gets worse post neutering, partly due to the babying factor and not feeling safe.

I would highly reccomend taking on www.barkbusters.com have a talk with them. Take with a grain of salt stuff from here as no one here has seen your dog, ANY type of aggression MUST be corrected. I agree it could be a medical thing, have that looked at and then consult the trainer. It's well worth it.

Your 'dominance' training means nothing the way you are doing it sorry. Consult the trainers, and woudl not be even thinking of going to anyone else, especially those police dog trainers or positive reinforcement people. This will get worse before it gets better the longer you wait. NO aggression should be tolerated from ANY dog.

Jewel
05-18-2010, 08:08 PM
Totally agree with seeking professional help. At 1 1/2 he is flexing his muscles and using aggression simply can't be tolerated. You need to address this ASAP, but must address with appropriate method.

It is my view that a dog that shows unprovoked aggression toward his owner really has no business staying intact. Testosterone does not make a dog aggressive but it does intensify aggression when the dog chooses to act aggressive. Now, it is true that neutering will not magically cure the dog of aggression. The aggression must be addressed with behavior modification training. So, I would suggest neutering along with professional help. As for a person's wish to keep a dog intact for cancer risk issues, the way I see it, a dog the size of a pyr will not live a long life anyway if its aggression threatens the humans around him.

Please seek out professionals right away. Given that he's taken such liberty in showing aggression already, you are probably not going to resolve this by yourself. Please don't wait unt it's too late to save your dog.

Black Angel
07-01-2010, 07:35 AM
OK Bear went through obiedience training he was with the trainer for 3 weeks, at this time my husband was in the hospital for the same amount of time, my husband had to have an external fixator put on his leg for 8 to 12 weeks. I trained with Bear and the trainer, Bear seemed fine I brought him home, the next day I brought my husband home from the hospital. I brought Bear up to see him, I had ahold of his collar as soon as he seen Bill he stared at him and wanted to attack. I am wondering because Bill has an open wound on his food and he has a blood infection if the dog could smell this and is scared of it. I don't know anymore I love my dog and will do anything to keep him but I can't have him going after my husband, the trainer suggested that I bring Bill and the dog in he wants to see how Bear acts around him. Any suggestions for me.

Topper
07-01-2010, 07:48 AM
Is this trainer just a obiedience or also behaviors? What you are going though I went though with my topper. I had to put him down at the age of 14 months. Is your husband afriad of him (I am sure he is) for these guy can smell this. I don't know if you are close to a big town to see if you can get some top behavior help. My husband had a couple of transplant done while this was also going on. Good luck.

vin63
07-01-2010, 08:04 AM
This situation does not seem to be improving. I guess I would address the notion of "dominance." Training should establish and build leadership among the people of the household, not dominance over the animal. And, if not all of the permanent members in the household are going to participate in the training, then it is unreasonable to expect the dog to react the same to each of those members. However, if leadership is established, the dog should listen to and obey its handler. I feel there is a significant lack of leadership in this case. In this instance, the behavior has manifested into aggression toward a human, but often this lack of leadership can also lead to other destructive behaviors (e.g., excessive digging, chewing, etc.), which are just as difficult to correct/address.

Even if my dogs do not initially welcome or feel threatened by a stranger, they will listen to me and not act out. They will also look to me for queues or commands for appropriate behavior. This was established, not through dominance, but through leadership.

Topper
07-01-2010, 09:12 AM
Vin63 you are very right. But not all of us are not leaders. I thought I was until I started helping with a rescue here in the last 6 months. I didn't know anything.
Linda the main rescue person is helping me with this. The malamute are a lot different then a pyrenees. I love the pyrenees breed so I am going to learn to be the leader before I get a puppy. My harry he listen pretty good.

fluffylove
07-01-2010, 03:59 PM
THis sort of thing gets to me. Get the best training in the world if they are around you www.barkbusters.com don't pin and dogs don't get it when you lift them up and tell them you are the boss!!! Your trainers should be castrated. This is rediculous. Dogs dont' 'speak english, they speak dog, and the best people to help you out are the bark buster trainers. I feel horrible for your dog. He gives you signs and you don't see them, he's essentially crying out for help.
I'm sorry about your situation, I really am, (especially when I have a sever sprain on my ankle and can't move right now much) but stop asking for help here, it won't do you any good at this point. Call the trainers and talk to them. I know it costs money but it will cost you a whole lot more when more damage is done.

ps-did yoiu trainers tell you to ignore your dog's demands for attention, play or food? And to start off to totally ignore your dog? He doesn't exist, this is THE ONLY way to get respect from your dog.

vin63
07-01-2010, 05:57 PM
Vin63 you are very right. But not all of us are not leaders. I thought I was until I started helping with a rescue here in the last 6 months. I didn't know anything.
Linda the main rescue person is helping me with this. The malamute are a lot different then a pyrenees. I love the pyrenees breed so I am going to learn to be the leader before I get a puppy. My harry he listen pretty good.

The unfortnate thing here is that the situation has already escalated to the point of aggression. This only serves to either put a human in danger or spell the end of a dog's life, or both...and all because a dog is being a dog. If people are not willing to spend the time and effort to properly care (care is not only feeding and vet appointments, but training as well) for their animal companions, then for the sake of the animal and people around you, please do not be an animal owner. As bad as the cases on this forum have been recently, I have to deal with many times more, and with worse outcomes in the horse world. But, it comes down to the same thing...humans not addressing and treating their animals as animals. It often starts as anthropomorphizing and attaching human emotions and expressions to our animals - they are not humans - or, worse, coddling pets and reinforcing unacceptable behaviors. Please seek behavior training help, or re-home your dog. I just don't want anyone hurt or bit.

Black Angel
07-02-2010, 05:57 AM
The guy I got for a trainer is also an obiediance and behavior trainer, right after the holiday he is coming to my house to see what is going on. Bear will sit stay and listen to my commands, but my husband is afraid after being bitten on the arm, and jumped on. Plus hes having more surgery on Wednesday.
I cannot put a dog down, I never have and I never will if I have to seperate the two, than thats how it will be. Too me Bear is the most lovable dog, and anyone else who comes over he greets them with a wagging tail. I honestly believe he smells the infection my husband has and is either afraid, or knows something is not right with him.

fluffylove
07-02-2010, 08:27 AM
sit and stay means absolutely squat! Your trainer doesn't know what he's talking about, sorry...but when it comes to aggression I don't hold back. Stop wasting your money because your training obviously doesn't have a clue what he's/she's doing! How on earth is a sit stay going to make you alpha in the house or gain you respect or even change the dog's mind about biting? How on earth is that even related??

Topper
07-02-2010, 08:53 AM
Please take fluffylove suggestion. She my be hard. But she is right. When I had my problems with topper. I tried very hard. Money was not the problem It was finding the right person that could help. If you have even one bad thought the this trainer is not going to help. Go looking else were ASAP. This is were I made my mistake. Just a couple of weeks ago the behaviorst I had just e-mailed back a answer to a question I had. I e-mailed her back and told her thanks but I had to put topper down because I got know help. If this trainer just put him on medicine and some paper to go off. Please look else were.
I know what you are going though but keep on top of it:)

vin63
07-02-2010, 11:30 AM
I cannot put a dog down, I never have and I never will if I have to seperate the two, than thats how it will be. Too me Bear is the most lovable dog, and anyone else who comes over he greets them with a wagging tail. I honestly believe he smells the infection my husband has and is either afraid, or knows something is not right with him.

I never mentioned putting your dog down. However, I do think that if an owner is unable to provide a safe and secure environment for an animal companion, then ownership should really be questioned. Separation is a temporary symptomatic resolution at best. The solution is to establish unquestioned leadership because the aggression is only the outward manifestation of a deeper rooted issue. Letting go of the excuse his aggression is because he smells something would be a good first step. I mentioned in another thread that my Isabella was horribly food aggressive when we first brought her home - attacking anything that got within 5 feet of her during meals. Within a month of bringing her home, my Yellow Lab, Henry was and is able to stand next to her as she eats, and Isabella even lets Henry eat the kibble she drops on the floor. This would not be possible if my wife and I did not establish leadership. And, by leadership I don't mean dominance. We made sure she understood that that behavior was not tolerated, and at the same time created an environment that Isabella felt safe, secure and confident.

fluffylove
07-02-2010, 12:04 PM
Thank you Topper! I am very passionate and it's hard to contain feelings when it's over and over I see things. I've been through every type of dog training out there from hitting to positive. I used to pin, I was told to feed, I've done it all. I truly know how to submit a dog without laying a hand on it. In fact, I'd love to see Cesar with my dominant male, even other bark busters that see me with my male are surprised as to what I have accomplished with him. It's a tone of work, and being 'alpha' is a daily chore. Look at cesar, he does it daily. It's a lifestyle.
I don't mean to offend, honest I don't but when it comes to aggression I know what I am talking about. I hate seeing dogs go through this sort of thing. I could fix your dog, come over, I'll fix him for you, but then you have to do homework too.

I often have to take a break from here because I'd say things I'd regret.

Yellowvespa
07-02-2010, 01:35 PM
I never mentioned putting your dog down. However, I do think that if an owner is unable to provide a safe and secure environment for an animal companion, then ownership should really be questioned. Separation is a temporary symptomatic resolution at best. The solution is to establish unquestioned leadership because the aggression is only the outward manifestation of a deeper rooted issue. Letting go of the excuse his aggression is because he smells something would be a good first step. I mentioned in another thread that my Isabella was horribly food aggressive when we first brought her home - attacking anything that got within 5 feet of her during meals. Within a month of bringing her home, my Yellow Lab, Henry was and is able to stand next to her as she eats, and Isabella even lets Henry eat the kibble she drops on the floor. This would not be possible if my wife and I did not establish leadership. And, by leadership I don't mean dominance. We made sure she understood that that behavior was not tolerated, and at the same time created an environment that Isabella felt safe, secure and confident.

I know this is stealing the thread but I do have a question for you. You mentioned your dog use to have food aggression and you stopped that behavior. My pup (17 weeks) is not aggressive with her "human" family when it comes to food. My husband and I can pick up her bowl, pet her, talk to her, and she will wag her tail. My kids can play near her while eating but I have always taught my children to stay away from ANY DOG while it's eating, just for safety reasons. I want them to know that not all dogs tolerate people bothering them while eating. Now, my pup will bark at our cats when they come by her and start smelling the air. She doesn't growl at them, she just barks. She hasn't been doing this very long but when she started I was on the fence about what to do. Is that considered aggressive, or just normal animal behavior when it comes to food? I mean, my cats will growl at her if they are eating and she tried to bother them. So, is it ok to allow the dog to bark or should I be worried that she will become aggressive?