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Lando
02-22-2010, 04:37 PM
Hi everyone, I'm new to the forum and new to the wonderful world of Pyr ownership. We just added a great "little" guy to our family. He is 10 weeks old and is absolutely the sweetest puppy. He has been with us for 2 weeks has been great. He is amazing around guests to our home and when we pickup my kindergarten son. House training has gone remarkably well. Better than any other dog I have owned, although I've not owned a Pyr before this guy. In puppy kindergarten, he is the most calm and the biggest of all the puppies. As I said, no problems, but tonight I noticed something that really concerned me. He was chewing on a treat (pig ear), one he'd never had before and as my 8 year old went to pet him, he gave a teeth baring almost ferocious growl. He has never done this before. He isn't protective of his food at all. Sorry for the long post. Just wondering if this is normal? Common in Pyr's? Should I be concerned?

Thanks.

vin63
02-22-2010, 04:51 PM
Since he's still a puppy, you will often have to deal with these instances of testing from your dog (nothing specific to the breed), just puppy behavior. The important thing to know is what was the next action/behavior that you and your son exhibited when he growled?

I find that immediate correction works best for me (show no fear, or surprise where you back off), firm speaking tone along with removing the object, and making the dog back away. But, other dogs and instances may require a different approach...the important thing is that the puppy realizes that that behavior is not acceptable. Good luck with the puppy rearing.

DaisyMae
03-13-2010, 06:27 PM
I think my dog when she was that age would do that to my kids but she quickly learned not to ever growl or nip at my kids. My kids are 5 and 2 years old and they are typical kids and we watch them closely when they're around the dog to make sure that they are not being annoying. When our dog was 10 week we had her on a leash while she was in the house. I held the leash and she had to stay where I was and if I got up to walk somewhere she would always be close. When we started letting her have more roaming room in the house the kids annoyed her sometimes and she would growl and bark. What I did was snap my fingers and say "hey or ugh uh". She quickly got the hint to not bark or growl at the kids. She stopped growling at the kids when she turned 4 months old and she hasnt done that since. She is still a pup (8.5 months old) and we still snap our finger if she does something wrong like chews on clothes etc. Also if I snap my finger and point she will go to wherever I point.

Also at that age its normal for a pup to do that, they just need to learn that its not acceptable

Terry
03-13-2010, 06:49 PM
Murphy did it once to our other dog a couple months ago, she is gone now but when he did it she was eating and i was nearby and couldnt believe the different expression on his face..
he didnt bite but he sure was mad over the food. we had to start letting him out when she ate as i didnt want that to happen again.
havent seen it since and the cats even bug him when he is eating :rolleyes:

like what has been said before thinking/hoping its just a young pyr thing :)

Terry

Davey Benson
03-14-2010, 07:27 AM
I think I was probably about that old when I was first bit by a dog, it was from our pet c0cker spanial. (I might have been a little younger than that actually).

He was eating his food in a bowl, and for some reason, I felt it necessary to pet/poke/pull/put my hand by his face, (I don't really remember what I was trying to do), but my hand was too close to his face while he was eating, and he grabbed it. I don't think he drew blood at that time, but I do remember what followed.

I ran to my parrents, to tattle on the dog, and they sat me down and gave me the facts of life.

"It's best not to mess with the dog while he's eating".

The c0cker wasn't a nippy dog, but he just didn't like being messed with while he was eating. So I suppose you can either train your dog not to be food agressive, or train the kids not to mess with the dog while he's eating. My parrents found it easier to train the kid. :rolleyes:

grtpyrlvr
03-14-2010, 10:50 AM
I have had my dogs do this was a pig ear to each other but never to another person or child. Since he is so young you just might want to get into the habit of petting his head and feet etc while he is eating anything. I do it with my older dog about once a week just to "test" and make sure he is still not guarding treats etc. He will growl if another big dog comes near but kids and people are okay.

With our new pup I also try to do it a couple times a day with treats, toys etc. Sometimes I lay beside her and pet the toy or the treat etc. This makes her used to other people getting near her stuff. One big rule in our house is "Do not tease the dog". The kids are never allowed to take anything from them or hold it outside their reach etc. This is an automatic times out in my house!

fluffylove
03-15-2010, 09:02 AM
VERY normal with pyrs. DO NOT LET PEOPLE PAT HIM WHILE EATING ANYTHING. Put him away and give him a treat then. If you are having problems and want help, get www.barkbusters.com as they will educate you in why he does things he does as this behavior if it's not resolved can get worse. Be careful with other trainers, they will push the dog and then say put him down. barkbusters respects dogs and gets the respect for you. He sounds like a great little guy! Where did you get him?

ps- my male is not great with food. My female, exceptional. It's all in the breeding. Pyrs HAD to be food aggressive as the sheep wanted to eat their food in the mountains so you still get that coming out in them. he's growling, and don't think he' won't 'snap'. that is sNOT an attack, though. The attack happens if a snap is not respected....but again, you'd learn all this through barkbusters. Training for life, it's awesome, not cheap but VERY well worth the investment while the puppy is still young. Puppy classes are a joke and don't do your pyr any good (sorry). I've seen them, been there, got my money back. It's more fun for us. I'd never do another class with any dog I own ever again.

Got pics?

nick's spirit
03-15-2010, 05:38 PM
As others have said...puppies will test. You must respond and take control and show them what is proper behavior.
The only other thing I have noticed with ALL my Pyr's....pig's ears & rawhides made them possesive and on their guard. Not sure if there is a chemical in the treats or if the treats stimulate this behavior. I have stopped giving any of my dogs these kinds of treats and life is calm.

Kate53
03-16-2010, 07:40 AM
As others have said...puppies will test. You must respond and take control and show them what is proper behavior.
The only other thing I have noticed with ALL my Pyr's....pig's ears & rawhides made them possesive and on their guard. Not sure if there is a chemical in the treats or if the treats stimulate this behavior. I have stopped giving any of my dogs these kinds of treats and life is calm.


It is definitely the treats (much coveted!) that cause the behavior. Dogs can be taught to realize your close proximity does not mean it will be taken away....but it takes time and as Fluffylove said....it's also a breed characteristic. I am fortunate that Queenie is not food aggressive with humans but can get "growl-y" with other dogs around.